Sorghum in the Field

Sorghum

Sorghum in the Field

Sorghum in the Field

You may have already heard by now that Sorghum is the Whole Grain Council’s Grain of the Month for June. Sorghum was already on our minds all through May’s Celiac Disease Awareness Month, as sorghum is often mentioned as the most “wheat-like” of all the gluten free flours. One of our favorite recipes using sorghum (other than the great recipe for scones on the package) is this fabulous recipe for Whole Grain Waffles which sound just perfect for a leisurely Sunday breakfast!

If you’ve been baking gluten free for a while you have probably noticed the wealth of recipes calling for sorghum. But despite its remarkable nutritional properties, this humble grain is rarely the center of attention. This is surprising because sorghum is an excellent source of protein and fiber for anyone, and there are even some surprising new studies about other possible health benefits that sorghum might have for diseases as varied as diabetes and cancer.

One fun thing that you may not realize even if you are already familiar with using sorghum is that although the flavor most resembles wheat in baking, the plant itself looks an awful lot like corn in the field. So much so, that there are seasonal “corn” mazes in some parts of the country made entirely from Sorghum! In fact, you’ve probably seen sorghum growing in the field without even noticing that it wasn’t corn.

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One Response to “Sorghum”

  1. I agree–sorghum is fantastic! Not only is it my favorite g/f flour to use in everything from cookies to crusts, it also makes a nice base for a g/f beer. Back in the pioneer days, sorghum was a big hit (particularly in the form of molasses), so it’s nice to see it finally coming back into vogue.

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