Spring Buckwheat Salad | Bob's Red Mill + The Hungry Hounds

Spring Buckwheat Salad

by Guest in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Hello Bob’s Red Mill readers and eaters!

We are delighted to join you today to share with you a seasonal recipe for buckwheat groats, one plucky and highly underrated grain.   Spring Buckwheat Salad is a light and zippy salad, flush with fiber and herbs. It is quick and easy to make, healthy, filling, and is a great alternative to traditional Bulgur wheat if you’re gluten-free. This salad allows the nutty flavor of buckwheat to come through and is a stunning way to showcase whatever seasonal vegetables or herbs you have on hand.

Spring Buckwheat Salad | Bob's Red Mill + The Hungry Hounds
We have a soft spot for buckwheat groats in our kitchen at The Hungry Hounds and often find ourselves making seasonal salads with this versatile and delicious grain.  We dropped by our farmers market this week and found some pungent wild ramps, violet flowers, asparagus, pea shoots and radishes and thought to make a salad that would provide a backdrop to these delicate spring edibles.  But don’t let access to local ingredients stop you, this salad will easily adapt to any fresh produce you have on hand.  For the vinaigrette we wanted to highlight spring herbs and pinched off the first round of basil leaves and batch of mint from our backyard herb garden.

A word about buckwheat groats for those unfamiliar with this lovely little grain.  Buckwheat is in fact not related to its’ namesake, wheat, and comes from the triangular seed of an herb.  Toasted buckwheat groats are called Kasha; Buckwheat groats are the raw version.   These kernels taste nutty and have a firm texture when cooked, they stand up well to this basil vinaigrette and meld deliciously together for a final product that is refreshing, filling and a stunning reminder of spring.

Spring Buckwheat Salad | Bob's Red Mill + The Hungry Hounds

Spring Buckwheat Salad

Ingredients:

Salad:

  • 1 cup Buckwheat Groats, rinsed
  • 3 Asparagus Spears, cut into small pieces, about 1/2 inch
  • 6-8 Wild Ramps, washed, outer membrane removed and cut into small pieces (substitute Green Onion, Leeks, Red Onion or Shallots)
  • 2 small Radishes, washed and sliced as thinly as possible
  • Small handful Violet Flowers for garnish
  • Small handful Pea Sprouts (substitute extra Mint, Basil, Parsley, Kale, or Spinach)

Basil Vinaigrette:

  • 4 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 1/4 cup Oil (preferably Extra Virgin Olive Oil)
  • 3 cloves Garlic
  • 1 teaspoon Kosher Salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground Black Pepper
  • ¼ cup fresh Mint
  • 1/2 cup fresh Basil
  • 3 Green Onion Stalks

Steps:

  1. Place 2 medium-large pots with water (at least 2 quarts) on high and bring to a boil.
  2. To the first pot add buckwheat groats and a large pinch of salt.
  3. Simmer buckwheat at medium-low heat for 11-14 minutes until the grains are cooked through.  You will want to start tasting them towards the end of the cook time to test for doneness.  The buckwheat should be roughly the texture of cooked brown rice; no hardness in the center, but firm and chewy.  Once cooked, drain and transfer to a serving bowl.
  4. Prepare a large bowl with very cold water and ice, you will be using this to blanch your vegetables.
  5. To the second pot of water add the chopped vegetables that you want to cook (asparagus and ramps).  Allow to cook in simmering water for one minute and then remove vegetables with a slotted spoon, transfer directly to the bowl with ice water. The ice bath stops the cooking process and preserves the vibrant color of your vegetables.  Once the vegetables are cooled down, 2-3 minutes, remove from ice water and set aside.
  6. In a blender or other food processing device combine the vinaigrette ingredients (vinegar, oil, garlic, salt, pepper, mint, basil, and green onion) and blend until smooth.
  7. Add the basil vinaigrette to the buckwheat.  Add ramps, asparagus, and radishes, stir gently to combine and garnish with the violet flowers and pea sprouts.  This salad gets better as the flavors meld, so ideally let it sit for 15-30 minutes prior to serving.

A few ideas for seasonal variations:

Summer: Tomato, corn and purple basil buckwheat salad with tomatillo salsa

Fall: Roasted butternut, beet and red onion buckwheat salad with crumbled blue cheese

Winter: Apple fennel buckwheat salad with blood orange vinaigrette

ABOUT US

The Hungry Hounds is the Pittsburgh-based food blog of Paul and Rebecca Shetler Fast. Their creative homespun cooking brings together local ingredients, traditional techniques, and an eclectic international palate. Paul loves using food science and traditional know-how to make delicious foods like sauerkraut, home-cured corned beef, and whole grain sourdough breads accessible for the home cook. Rebecca is the creative force in the duo, bringing fresh ideas, spunky charm, and bold flavors to the table. As a couple that cooks, works, and blogs together, they are passionate about the ability of food to bring people together.   While not blogging for The Hungry Hounds, Paul and Rebecca both work full-time in healthcare (Rebecca as a Social Worker, Paul as a Manager). Paul is also a full time graduate student in Public Health. Follow The Hungry Hounds on Facebook or Pinterest.

About The Author
Guest Google: Guest
Share this article:

One Response to “Spring Buckwheat Salad”

  1. Hi, I just read what you had to say about different types of oatmeal. One comment made was that Steel Cut Oats produced a less creamy oatmeal than Rolled Oats. I will have to disagree with that, in a way. Yes…if one prepares oatmeal according the package directions that remark is correct. But, as I do not like a chewy result I changed a couple of things. The consistency of the Oatmeal one makes is dependent on HOW one makes it. I use one part steel cut oats, 4 to 4.5 parts water, and simmer for about 50 minutes. I make extra, refrigerate, and use the leftover portions another day…or days.

    The result is an EXCEPTIONALLY creamy oatmeal. Far more than that can be made with rolled oats. The result is so good , in fact, that I am never going back to rolled oats…at least not for oatmeal! After what amounts to going on 50 years of making oatmeal, I’d say this is a pretty reliable observation.

    Thanks for all the info on the various processes. Having just made this switch, it was just what I was looking for.

    Best Wishes

Leave a Reply

XHTML: You can use these tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>