What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Sorghum

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is sorghum? Also know as milo, sorghum is a grain that originated in Africa thousands of years ago. It spread throughout the Middle East with traders, ultimately becoming a staple of the region and is still a heavily consumed grain in India. Though sorghum as a food is relatively unknown in most parts of the world, it has long been used as animal feed and for the production of sorghum syrup/molasses. (Interestingly, sorghum syrup is much more labor intensive than traditional cane and beet molasses. It’s production in the United States fell dramatically after World War II and is now more of a specialty regional item in the South.)

What is it? Wednesday: Sorghum | Bob's Red Mill

Is sorghum a whole grain? Yes, sorghum is a whole grain. The variety we offer is a round, golden kernel that is about the size of large pearl tapioca.

Is sorghum gluten free? Yes, sorghum is inherently gluten free. The grain and the flour we produce are made in our gluten free facility and tested for gluten.

What does it taste like? Sorghum has a mild, earthy flavor. It’s texture and flavor is similar to wheat berries and the flour has been called out as being the most wheat-like gluten free flour.

How do you use sorghum? Sorghum can be used in soups, salads, side dishes, pilafs and more. It makes a great substitute for wheat berries, pearl couscous and other gluten-full grains in most recipes. One of our favorite ways to enjoy sorghum is to pop it. It makes perfect little miniature “popcorn” that the kid in all of us will enjoy. Check out the video below for directions.

What about sorghum flour? Milled from whole grain sorghum, this flour is a great addition to gluten free baked goods. It has a good amount of protein and, when used in baking, helps with browning (something gluten free baked goods often struggle with). The protein also helps replicate the lost gluten, providing a more wheat-like texture.

Some of our favorite ways to enjoy whole grain sorghum:

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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