Pumpkin Spice Cream Puffs | Bob's Red Mill

Pumpkin Spice Cream Puffs

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

I know it’s Monday and we’re supposed to have a meatless recipe for Meatless Mondays, but these technically don’t have any meat. I felt compelled to share them far enough ahead of Thanksgiving so you could adjust your dessert plans, and, trust me, you might want to rethink your dessert plans. This classy dessert comes from Kelly of Evil Shenanigans. These cream puffs are much closer to angelic than they are to evil. Yes, they are time consuming to create, but oh-so-worth-it.  Children and adults, alike, will enjoy the perfectly puffy pastry and creamy pumpkin filling. Pair these with an after dinner coffee (cocoa for the kiddos) and everyone will feel utterly spoiled that you put forth such an effort.

Find more amazing recipes by Kelly for all sorts of wonderful dishes from breakfast to dessert at Evil Shenanigans. 

Pumpkin Spice Cream Puffs | Bob's Red Mill

Pumpkin Spice Cream Puffs 

Yield 20

Ingredients:

For the filling:

  • 1 cup Whole Milk
  • ½ cup Pumpkin Puree
  • 1/3 cup packed Light Brown Sugar
  • 2 Tbsp Cornstarch
  • ½ tsp Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp Allspice
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • 1/8 tsp Cloves
  • 1/8 tsp Nutmeg
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 Egg Yolk
  • 1 Tbsp Butter
  • 1 tsp Vanilla
  • ½ tsp Unflavored Gelatin
  • 1 Tbsp cool Water
  • 1 cup Heavy Cream
  • 1 Tbsp Powdered Sugar

For the pastry:

Begin by preparing the filling.

In a blender combine the milk, pumpkin, sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, allspice, salt, clove, nutmeg, egg, and egg yolk. Blend on high speed until the mixture is completely combined, about 30 seconds.

Pour the mixture into a saucepan and place over medium heat. Cook, whisking constantly, until the mixture comes to a boil and thickens, about 8 minutes. Allow the mixture to boil for 30 seconds then turn off the heat and add the butter and vanilla. Whisk until the butter is melted. Pour the mixture through a strainer into a bowl, place a layer of plastic wrap directly over the custard, and chill for 2 hours.

Pumpkin Spice Cream Puffs | Bob's Red Mill

Once chilled combine the gelatin with the cool water and let it sit at room temperature for 10 minutes to bloom. Once bloomed heat for 8 to 10 seconds in the microwave to melt. Cool for 3 minutes.

In the work bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whip attachment, or in a medium bowl with a hand mixer, combine the heavy cream and powdered sugar. Whip on medium high speed until the cream is fluffy, about 1 minute. Add the melted gelatin and increase the speed to high and whip until the mixture forms firm peaks, about 30 to 40 seconds more.

Stir the chilled pumpkin custard to loosen it, then add it directly to the cream and whip on high for 20 to 30 seconds to incorporate thoroughly. Cover with plastic and chill for 1 hour.

Now, prepare the choux pastry.

Heat the oven to 425 F and position the rack into the center of the oven. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a medium saucepan combine the water, butter, sugar, pumpkin, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon. Place the pan over medium heat and stir occasionally until the mixture comes to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium low and add the flour all at once. Stirring vigorously, combine the flour and the liquid until it forms a ball. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes, or until the dough leaves a film on the bottom of the pan and is smooth.

Transfer the dough to the work bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or a medium bowl with a hand mixer. Cool the dough until it reaches 125 F, about 5 minutes. Once cooled begin beating the mixture on low speed and add the eggs, one at a time, making sure the first egg is fully incorporated before adding the next

Put the mixture to a piping bag fitted with a large round piping tip. Pipe the paste into 2 inch balls onto the prepared baking sheet about 2 inches apart.  If you find the tops of the puffs are very pointy just dampen your finger with water and tamp them down gently.  Bake for 5 minutes, then lower the heat to 350 F and bake for 20 to 25 minutes more, or until the puffs are deeply golden brown all over and sound hollow when gently tapped on the bottom.  Remove the pan from the oven and allow to cool to room temperature.

Once chilled fill the cooled puffs with the pumpkin filling.  You can either use a small star tip to pipe the filling into the bottoms of the puffs, or you can slice the tops of the puffs, pipe in the filling, and then put the tops back on.

Dust with powdered sugar if desired.

Pumpkin Spice Cream Puffs | Bob's Red Mill

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Bread Starters: Sour

Bread Starters Part Three: Natural Cultures

by Sarah House in Featured Articles, Recipes

We’ve prefermented.  We’ve baked.  We understand the basic concepts of yeast fermentation!  Now, it’s time for the grand poobah – natural cultures.

Natural cultures have unlimited life (you can keep them alive for practically forever with proper feedings).  You need only flour and water.  The only yeast used is that which is found in the surrounding environment.  It takes about a week to grow a starter and after that, it’s good to go!

There are several names for starters: sourdough, sour, levain, mother, chef, seed, etc., but they are all essentially the same thing.  Hydration amounts may differ but growing, sustaining and using starters follow the same steps.  Below is a recipe for building Bob’s Red Mill Basic Loose Wheat Sour.

Bread Starters: Sour

Building Your Sour

_____ Day 1  

Unbleached White Flour         3 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1 oz

Water (85°F)                           4 oz

Mix until combined in a large bowl; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.  *Use a clean non-reactive metal or glass bowl.  Only use plastic if it is clean and free of other odors.

_____ Day 2

Mix well and scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *This should look bubbly and smell “ripe”.  Discard if there is ever mold in the sour.

_____ Day 3

Unbleached White Flour         3 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1 oz

Water (85°F)                           4 oz

Sour                                         4 oz

Discard remaining 4 oz of sour (or give out to friends so they can grow their own).  Add flours and water and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *There will be quite a bit of waste when building a sour.  Unfortunately, this is necessary so the sour does not get too large to easily maintain or use.

_____ Day 4

Unbleached White Flour         2.25oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 .75 oz

Water (85°F)                           3 oz

Sour                                         6 oz

Discard remaining 6 oz of sour.  Add flours and water and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ Day 5

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 9 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *Cooler water is used from now on to slow down fermentation and build flavor and acidity.

_____ Day 6

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 12 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ Day 7

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 12 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

It is now time to decide if you want to use your sour within 24 hours or if it will be time to begin maintenance and storage.  If you are going to store your sour for use at a later date, decide if you want to store it at room temperature with daily feedings or in the refrigerator with monthly feedings.

Maintaining Your Sour   *Feedings eliminate over-fermentation (which occurs when yeast consumes all available food leaving it unable to leaven).

At room temperature

_____ Day 8 and on…

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Discard remaining sour as often as needed – always keep at least 8 oz of sour.  Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit a room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

In the refrigerator

_____ Day 8 and then once a week every three weeks…

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Discard remaining sour as often as needed – always keep at least 8 oz of sour.  Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover loosely with a lid and store in the refrigerator.  Feed the same ratio every three weeks.

Now you’ve built your healthy starter and you know how to keep it alive with regular feedings.  But what’s the point of all this work if you never get to enjoy the fruits of your labors?  Let your starter reach its full potential.  Let’s bake some bread!

  You

Yeah!  Oh, wait, hold up.  This starter has been stored in my fridge for the last two weeks.

 Me

Ooooh, um….

You

Are you trying to tell me I can’t just whip up a loaf of bread?

Me

Yes, that is exactly what I am saying.

You

Me

You need to wake it up a bit.  Give it some energy so it can make a great loaf of bread.  You just need to plan ahead a little.

That’s right folks, using a natural culture starter requires some planning.  At least 24 hours if it’s stored at room temperature but, if you store your starter in the fridge, you need to give it four days to gain enough strength to leaven a loaf of bread.  Starters are easy to grow and maintain but if you are not so adept at planning, this aspect may be a drawback.

Using Your Sour  *Plan ahead!

If you are storing your sour at room temperature, make sure to feed it 18 – 24 hours before you plan to bake.  If you are storing your sour in the refrigerator, remove at least half the amount you will be using from the refrigerator four days before baking.  Let it sit at room temperature for 24 hours then begin feeding it for three days before baking.

From here on out, we’ll be referring to ratios and parts.  1 part sour will be the amount of sour you will be starting with (if you follow the instructions below, it will be half the amount you will need for the final bread recipe).  Let’s say your recipe call for 8 oz of starter.  Begin with 4 oz; that will equal 1 part.  Therefore, 2 parts water will be 8 oz, 0.5 parts whole wheat flour will be 2 oz and 1.5 parts unbleached white flour will be 6 oz.  Got it?

At room temperature

_____ 1 Day Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Remove at least half the amount of sour you will need.  In a large bowl, mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

In the refrigerator

_____ 4 Days Before Baking

Remove at least half the amount of sour you will need.  Place it in a large clean ceramic, glass or metal bowl.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 3 Days Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 2 Days Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 1 Day Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

Bread Starters: Sour

That’s what I call a sour!

Baking Day!

Measure the amount of sour you need and follow your recipe as directed.

See?  Refreshing your starter is relatively painless!  And now you have a luscious, fragrant, deeply-flavored loaf of bread.  Totally worth it.

Can I make a gluten free starter?  Yes, just use gluten free flours and remember to include binder gums in the final bread dough.

Can I change of the flavor of my starter?  Yes, beer, buttermilk, yogurt, and fruit juice all provide new and unique flavors.

Will my bread really be that much better using a starter?  Yes.  Go ahead, make a loaf with starter and one without.  You’ll see.  I dare you.

Oh, and if you’re going out of town for awhile, you can always take your starter to the Sourdough Hotel.

Happy Baking!

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Sarah House Google: Sarah House
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Muesli2

Muesli Mayhem {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

To get everyone revved up about our new Gluten Free Muesli, we asked some of our favorite bloggers to take a bag of it and create something fun and delicious. They really outdid themselves. These recipes are beautiful and we hope they inspire you to try something new when enjoying our muesli. They all did such a nice job, that we’re having trouble picking our favorite.

Help us choose a winner by voting for your favorite creation. Tell us in the comments which of these recipes should win the grand prize and you’ll be entered to win a prize pack that contains two packages of our Gluten Free Muesli and two Bob’s Red Mill products of your choice (excluding bulk sizes). Many of these bloggers are giving away muesli, too. We’ve indicated which ones are up and running so you can head over and enter to win even more muesli. If that isn’t enough, you can join the fun by taking a picture of yourself with a package of our gluten free muesli and enter our Pinterest and Instagram contests. Read more about that contest here. There are so many ways to win and it’s so easy to enter! Vote for as many recipes as you like, but each person will only be entered to win once. Voting is open until May 2nd at 11:59 pm.

Here they are in no particular order…

Note: To get the recipe, simply click on the link to their blog in the caption, this will take you right to the recipe.

Gluten Free Muesli Bar Recipe:: Amie Valpone, The Healthy Apple

Gluten Free Muesli Bar:: Amie Valpone, The Healthy Apple

Five-Spice Muesli Granola (and Peach-Greek Yogurt Parfaits) :: Heather Sage, A Sage Amalgam {GIVEAWAY}

Five-Spice Muesli Granola (and Peach-Greek Yogurt Parfaits) :: Heather Sage, A Sage Amalgam {Giveaway}

Gluten Free Peanut Butter Muesli Bars:: Janel Ovrut Funk, Eat Well with Janel

Gluten Free Peanut Butter Muesli Bars:: Janel Ovrut Funk, Eat Well with Janel

Muesli Morning Cake Gluten-Free:: Jean, Delightful Repast

Muesli Morning Cake Gluten-Free:: Jean, Delightful Repast {Giveaway}

Dark Chocolate Dipped Peanut Butter Muesli Bars:: Amanda Moore, Bullfrogs & Bulldogs

Dark Chocolate Dipped Peanut Butter Muesli Bars:: Amanda Moore, Bullfrogs & Bulldogs

Muesli Cream Pies:: Carolyn Ketchum, All Day I Dream About Food

Muesli Cream Pies:: Carolyn Ketchum, All Day I Dream About Food {Givaway}

Apple Cinnamon Muesli Breakfast Bake:: Julia Mueller, The Roasted Root

Apple Cinnamon Muesli Breakfast Bake:: Julia Mueller, The Roasted Root {Giveaway}

Gluten-Free Muesli Pancakes with Fresh Berries:: Jeanette Chen, Jeanette's Healthy Living

Gluten-Free Muesli Pancakes with Fresh Berries:: Jeanette Chen, Jeanette’s Healthy Living {Giveaway}

Peach Breakfast Calzone:: Sarena Shasteen, The Non Dairy Queen

Peach Breakfast Calzone:: Sarena Shasteen, The Non Dairy Queen {Giveaway}

Hedgehog Muesli Bars:: Ericka Sanchez, Nibbles and Feasts

Hedgehog Muesli Bars:: Ericka Sanchez, Nibbles and Feasts

 

Strawberry, Banana and Blueberry Muesli Bread:: Claire Gallam: The Realistic Nutritionist

Strawberry, Banana and Blueberry Muesli Bread:: Claire Gallam, The Realistic Nutritionist {Giveaway}

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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flour

Baking with Coconut Flour: Google Plus Hangout

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

Join us on March 27th at 12 pm (EST) for a chat about baking with coconut flour. Jeanette Chen, of Jeanette’s Healthy Living, will be discussing the ins and outs of this unique flour with several top food bloggers and our very own Sarah House. Come join the fun and ask questions (we’re also giving away some fun prizes)!

RSVP and get event info here.

If you’re not on Google Plus, it’s very easy to sign up- all you need is a Google account. If you can’t make it, we’ll post the complete hangout video after the chat.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Scones2

Irish Soda Berry Scones

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

Happy St Patrick’s Day!

These scones are an easy, versatile recipe using our Irish Soda Bread Mix. Use berries as suggested, or mix it up with your favorite add-ins. To celebrate in true Irish style, some currants or raisins might be appropriate. Serve these with a pat of butter and some Irish breakfast tea (or a Guinness, we won’t tell).

Irish Soda Berry Scones

Irish Soda Berry Scones

  •     24 oz (4-1/4 cup) Irish Soda Bread Mix
  •     1 cup Water
  •     1/2 cup Oil
  •     1 cup Berries

Directions

Preheat oven to 425°F. In a large bowl, combine mix with water and oil. Stir just until barley combined and then stir in the berries, careful not to over mix. Divide mixture in half. Pat each half into a flattened circle and place on a greased baking sheet about 1-inch apart.  Cut each circle into 6 wedges.  Bake for 15 minutes.  Makes 12 scones.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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English Muffins

Bread Starters Part Two: Biga and Poolish

by Sarah House in Featured Articles, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

I hope everyone was able to try out one of the preferments discussed in the previous post (pâte fermentée or a sponge).  What did you notice about your bread?  Was it taller? Stronger?  Nicer crumb?  Fabulous!  Let’s move on to some preferments that offer a bit more flavor along with the great structural boosts they’re known for.

First up:  biga.  Biga is a traditional Italian preferment that is often used with super soft, highly hydrated doughs like ciabatta and focaccia.  This preferment’s ratio of 2 parts flour to 1 part water make for a very stiff mixture that can be hard to mix by hand.  After the initial mix, a biga will look rather useless.  But, give it a few hours and it will soften and hydrate.  You’ll know your biga is ripe and ready when the dough is domed and just beginning to recede in the center.  The best thing about bigas:  they offer a lot of flavor and many qualities of sours without the time commitment.

Biga

Prepare 8 – 24 hours before baking.

  • Flour                30% of total flour from bread recipe
  • Water              equal weight as 15% of total flour
  • Yeast               8 – 10% of total yeast from bread recipe

Biga

 Now it’s time for my favorite in the preferment family (shhh, don’t tell the others):  poolish.  Poolish was originally used in Poland (hence the name) and is such a great preferment that it is one of the most widely used in French bakeries.  That’s right, French boulangers ditched their very own pâte fermentée to use a Polish poolish.  Why is it so popular?  Yes, yes, you’ll get great rise, crust and structure but you’ll also get a fabulous moist crumb with chewy texture and amazing flavor.  Oh, the flavor!  Sweet and tangy and just about perfection.

Poolish is the most hydrated preferment (1 part flour to 1 part water) and looks almost soupy.  This high hydration content is what creates the winning crumb and chew.  Ripeness is indicated when the surface is covered with small bubbles.  If the poolish has risen and then begun to recede (called a “high water mark”) its leavening power is shot.  Do over. And if you’re wondering what to make using a poolish, try this Whole Wheat English Muffins recipe.  They were a huge hit here at Bob’s and I ate three of them in about 20 minutes.  Seriously.

Whole Wheat English Muffins

Poolish

Prepare 4 – 24 hours before baking.

  • Flour                30% of total flour from bread recipe
  • Water              equal weight as 30% total flour
  • Yeast               8 – 10% of total yeast from bread recipe

 

Poolish

 A word about measurements

You may have noticed that, so far, all of the formulas are using percentages and reference weight.  Why is that?  Because measuring by weight is far more accurate than measuring by volume.  If you are serious about baking and want to produce consistently excellent products, use a scale.  Treat yourself.  And your eaters.  Baker’s scales for home cooks are incredibly affordable (Bob’s Red Mill sells this one).  And with the ability to measure in American Standard or metric, you can make delicious recipes from those crazy countries that don’t use our ounces and pounds (which is everyone).

Stay tuned….next week we’ll be pulling out the big guns:  naturally cultured sourdough starters.

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Sarah House Google: Sarah House
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National Flour Month: Low Carb Flour Primer {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

This is our second post in our series on the different flours we produce. Last week, we covered wheat flour, read all about it here.

When you think of Bob’s Red Mill, the words “low carbohydrate” do not often spring to mind. If you took a look at our product line, you might think all we make are carbohydrates, but as anyone who follows a low carb or paleo diet will tell you, we have quite a few low carb options.

Whether you follow a restricted carb diet for health reasons or simply want to lose a few pounds, these flours are essential for  keeping your sanity and enjoying some of the foods you miss the most on a low carb diet. Here are our most popular low carb flours and some ideas for what to do with them.

Almond Meal/Flour: Almonds are notoriously healthy nuts providing a good amount of manganese and vitamin E , as well as a healthy serving of monounsaturated fats in each 1/4 cup serving. Not only do almonds have a healthy boost of protein, they are also very low in carbohydrates and naturally gluten free. Replacing 25% of the flour in your baking with almond meal will add wonderful texture and flavor while reducing the total carbohydrates.  Although it has a lightly sweet flavor, almond meal can also be used in savory applications. Use almond meal in place of bread crumbs in meatballs, or as a coating for chicken and fish. Browse recipes for almond meal here.

Coconut Flour: Organic coconut flour is a delicious, healthy alternative to wheat and other grain flours. Ground from dried, defatted coconut meat, coconut flour is high in fiber and low in digestible carbohydrates. A single 2 Tbsp serving of coconut flour delivers 5 grams of fiber with only 8 grams of carbs. The light coconut flavor allows coconut flour to blend seamlessly into sweet or savory baked goods. It makes a wonderful coating for chicken, fish or other proteins in place of regular flour or cornmeal. Because of its high fiber content, baking with coconut flour is a unique experience. Coconut flour requires an equal ratio of liquid to flour for best results. Coconut flour can replace up to 20% of the flour in a recipe, but you will need to add an equal amount of liquid to compensate.  We recommend following a recipe designed for coconut flour when getting started. Luckily, we have many recipes to experiment with in our recipe section. Coconut flour is unsweetened and does not contain sulfites.

Bob's Red Mill Low Carb Flours: Almond Meal, Coconut Flour, Hazelnut Meal, Soy Flour

Hazelnut Meal/Flour: Bob’s Red Mill Hazelnut Meal is ground from whole Oregon hazelnuts, or filberts. Hazelnuts are often overlooked for their nutritional value, but these healthy nuts provide a good amount of vitamin E and a healthy serving of monounsaturated fats in each 1/4 cup serving. You can replace up to 30% of the flour in your baking with hazelnut meal to add wonderful texture and flavor.  Hazelnut meal will bring a rich, buttery flavor to your baking while adding an enticing aroma that can only come from high quality hazelnuts. Hazelnut meal can be used in savory applications, as well. Use hazelnut meal in place of bread crumbs in meatballs, or as a coating for chicken and fish.  Our hazelnut meal is not blanched. Find recipes for using hazelnut meal.

Soy Flour: Our soy flour is milled from whole, raw soy beans. This flour is a great source of complete protein, as well as a good source of fiber, calcium, iron, magnesium and phosphorus. You can replace up to 30% of the flour in your recipe with soy flour. Soy flour is naturally gluten free, however we do not produce it in our gluten free facility. Baked goods made with soy flour tend to brown more quickly, so it is best to use a recipe designed for soy flour or to keep a close eye on your baking when using it. Find recipes for using soy flour here.

millstone

Giveaway

We’d like to give one lucky reader a set of our low carb flours- almond meal, coconut flour, hazelnut meal and soy flour To enter, simply follow the directions in the app below. We’ll pick a winner at random from all who enter by 12:01 am on 03/20/13.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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National Flour Month: Wheat Flour Primer {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

March is National Flour Month and flour is something we get pretty excited about at Bob’s Red Mill. After all, we make a lot of different products, but flour is special. Not only do we use our millstones to grind it, but we take a whole grain and mill it into a whole grain flour. Nothing added, nothing removed. One pound of grain in, one pound of flour out. It’s pretty simple, but pretty amazing, too. In honor of National Flour Month, we’re doing a little series on the different types of flour that we offer. Each week, we’ll giveaway a set of flours to a lucky winner. This week, we’re starting with the different varieties of wheat flour that we produce. If wheat flour isn’t your thing, don’t worry, we’ll cover our other flours all in good time.

millstone

Wheat flour is probably the single most ubiquitous flour in the world. It is in nearly every packaged food and baked good you look at, even those things that you never think about being baked at all. It’s in those pretty breads at the bakery, the flour tortillas at your local Mexican restaurant, the boxes of pasta you just bought, it’s the backbone of couscous, the thickener in sauces, the breading on your fish, really and truly, as anyone with gluten intolerance can tell you, wheat flour is everywhere. In a perfect world, everything made with wheat would be made with whole wheat flour, but we all know that the world isn’t perfect and that beautiful, fluffy pastries are best achieved with white flour. So we make the best choices we can and practice a bit of moderation.

Whole Wheat Flour: Standard whole wheat flour is milled from high protein, hard red spring wheat. This flour has a minimum protein level of 13.5% and is excellent for bread baking and anywhere yeast is used as the leavening agent (think pizza, pretzels, etc). Because it is whole grain, baked goods using solely whole wheat flour will be a bit more dense. Use a combination of 50% whole wheat and 50% white flour to create a balanced texture and crumb in your baked good. Adding vital wheat gluten to your baked good will improve the elasticity and rise of your dough (use 1 Tbsp per cup of flour).

whole wheat flour unbleached white flour

Whole Wheat Pastry Flour: Whole Wheat Pastry Flour is milled from soft white wheat and has a maximum protein content of 13%. This is an excellent choice for baked goods that use baking soda or baking powder as a leavening agent. The lower gluten content does not trap air bubbles as effectively as conventional whole wheat flour, which will not give yeast-risen baked goods the proper rise they need. Use this flour for pastries, cookies, cakes and quick breads.

Hard White Whole Wheat Flour: This special flour is one of our favorite products at Bob’s Red Mill. Milled from high protein, hard white wheat, this flour is the best of both worlds. Light in color, yet full of whole grain goodness, hard white whole wheat flour has a sweeter flavor than conventional whole wheat flour, appealing to those that find whole wheat baked goods to be slightly bitter. It is ideal for bread baking, but can be used for other baked goods. Like regular whole wheat flour, it will make baked goods more dense, so it can be used in combination with white flour to achieve a lighter texture.

Unbleached White Flour: This is not to be confused with All Purpose Flour. Standard unbleached white flour is milled from the same hard red spring wheat as whole wheat flour, but has the germ and bran stripped away to produce a white flour. It has a minimum protein level of 13% and is often referred to as bread flour. This flour is ideal for breads and yeast-risen baked goods, but can be used in place of all purpose flour for most recipes. Read more about white flour here where we go into bleaching, bromating, enriching and more.

Unbleached White Pastry Flour: The refined counterpart of whole wheat pastry flour, this flour is milled from soft white wheat with the bran and germ removed. This flour has a maximum protein content of 9%, making it both the lowest protein wheat flour we carry and the most ideal for fine cake and pastry baking.

Semolina Flour: Semolina flour is the quintessential flour for pasta making and is milled from durum wheat. It has a sandy texture and contains about 12% protein, making it great for bread baking and pizza crust.

Graham Flour: Graham flour is quite simply a coarsely ground whole wheat flour. Milled from hard red spring wheat, graham flour can be used in place of whole wheat flour, however it should only be used for about 20% of the flour in your recipe or you will end up with a very dense baked good. Graham flour can be substituted for Whole Meal Flour with little difference in the texture of the baked good. Graham flour is not made from ground up graham crackers as some people believe, but it can be used to make graham crackers.

Unbleached White Flour

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Giveaway

We’d like to give one lucky reader a set of our whole wheat flours- organic whole wheat flour, organic hard white whole wheat flour and organic whole wheat pastry flour. To enter, simply follow the directions in the app below. We’ll pick a winner at random from all who enter by 12:01 am on 03/13/13.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Muffins4

Whole Wheat English Muffins

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

As promised, here is our recipe for Whole Wheat English Muffins. I had to try these out for myself before I shared them so I knew exactly what you were getting yourself into if you attempt these. First off, this recipe takes a serious time commitment. Second, this recipe is painfully easy to put together. With a little bit of planning, you can have fresh, chewy English muffins for breakfast one day (if you get up really, really early) and everyone will be so impressed with your baking skills.

Here’s what you need to know- the time commitment is primarily a matter of rising time. These babies start with a poolish that ferments overnight, then allowed to come to room temp for at least 3 hours. Then the dough is mixed and needs to rise for 45 minutes. The dough is folded and rises again for 15 minutes, then shaped into muffins and left to rise for a final 15 minutes… so maybe you have these more like noon (like we did at our house) or for dinner. While they are something akin to heaven straight from the oven, these are phenomenal the next day and the day after that. We didn’t have any make it past that to attest to their quality. I think my husband ate 3 of these straight from the oven. Fresh, they don’t even need butter to be amazing (but it certainly doesn’t hurt).English Muffins Whole Wheat

I’d consider myself a novice bread baker. Sure, I’ve made basic breads and pizza dough, but I was incredibly intimidated by this recipe. My advice to you: don’t be. It was easy to follow and, even when I flubbed a step, the results were divine.

A dab of butter, a slathering of jam, a smooth layer of peanut butter, a fried egg with a bit of cheese… whatever you opt to top these with will be worth it, I promise.

[A note about equipment and measurements. If you have them, English muffin rings are handy. If you don't, a big biscuit cutter or even just a dough knife will work. The rings helped to make that perfect "English muffin" shape, but they really wouldn't make or break the recipe. We've included household measurements here as a courtesy, but, as I'm learning a baking scale is a kitchen essential for serious bakers. Not only does it improve the outcome of your recipe when you weigh your ingredients, it makes you feel like a real baker! Scales are pretty affordable. We sell a good one, but you can also find quite a selection on Amazon, as well.]

Whole Wheat English Muffins

Recipe by Sarah House

Yield twelve 3 ½ oz muffins

Poolish

  • 6 ¾ oz Water (110°F)
  • ¼ tsp Active Dry Yeast
  • 6 ¾ oz (1 ½ cups + 3 Tbsp) Unbleached White Flour

Bread Dough

  • 14 oz Warm Water (110°)
  • 1 Tbsp Active Dry Yeast
  • 13 ½ oz Poolish (entire recipe from above)
  • 1 oz Unsalted Butter
  • 15 ¼ oz (3 cups + 3 Tbsp) Unbleached White Flour
  • 5 oz (1 cup) Whole Wheat Flour
  • 2 tsp Sugar
  • 1 Tbsp Salt
  • Semolina Flour as needed

Poolish

  1. In a large, non-reactive metal or glass bowl (only use plastic if it is clean and free of odors), proof yeast in water until “milky”, about 5 minutes.
  1. Add the flour and stir until a smooth, elastic batter has formed.
  1. Scrape down the sides and cover with plastic wrap; let sit at room temperature for 1 hour.
  1. (Optional) For the most sourdough-like flavor, transfer to the refrigerator and chill 8 – 24 hours. Skip step 5 if you do not refrigerate your poolish.
  1. Remove poolish from the refrigerator and let sit at room temperature for 3 – 4 hours.  It should have tripled in volume.  Use within 4 hours, before it begins to deflate.

Bread Dough

  1. Sprinkle the yeast into the water and let sit until the yeast looks “milky”, about 5 minutes then add the poolish.
  1. Meanwhile, combine the flours in a bowl.  Rub the butter into the flour mixture until it resembles sand.
  1. Add the sugar, salt and flour mixture to the yeast and mix until a dough forms (about 4 minutes on low with a dough hook), scraping down the sides of the bowl often.  Continue mixing until a wet and tacky dough has formed (about 2 additional minutes at medium speed).
  1. Place the dough in a large, lightly oiled bowl, turn once to coat all sides and cover with plastic wrap or a clean towel.  Let rise until an indentation remains when lightly pressed with a fingertip, about 45 – 60 minutes.
  1. Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and fold it into thirds like a letter.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rise until an indentation remains when lightly pressed with a fingertip, about 15 minutes.
  1. Preheat the oven to 475°F (use of a baking stone is useful but not necessary).  Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
  1. Uncover the dough and lightly dust both sides with semolina flour.  Gently roll or pat out the dough to about ½-inch thickness (take care not to deflate the dough too much).  Using English muffin rings or a pastry/pizza wheel, punch or cut to the desired shape (about 3-inches wide).
  1. Place the muffins on one prepared baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap.  Let rest for 15 minutes.
  1. Heat a nonstick skillet on medium heat for 5 minutes.  Taking care not to crowd the pan, cook the muffins in batches until both sides are browned.  Place cooked muffins on clean prepared baking sheet.
  1. Bake muffins until the internal temperature reads 205°F, about 6 – 8 minutes.
  1. Remove from the hot baking sheet and let cool on a rack before slicing.
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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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6 Grain Muffins

Ruthie’s 6 Grain Muffins

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

Lazy Saturday? Why not whip up a batch of these delicious, healthy muffins? Using a granular cereal gives these muffins a bit of bite while adding a beautiful flavor—not to mention the nutritional boost! Balancing the whole grains in the cereal by using white flour, keeps them light and delicious. Swap out the white flour for whole wheat pastry flour if you want a dense, whole grain muffin. If you don’t have our 6 Grain Cereal on hand, any whole grain granular cereal (like our Mighty Tasty or 10 Grain Hot Cereal) will do in a pinch.

6 Grain Muffins Whole Grain

Ruthie’s 6 Grain Muffins

  •     1 cup Org 6 Grain Right Stuff Cereal
  •     1-1/2 cups Sour Milk or Buttermilk
  •     1/2 cup Sugar
  •     1/3 cup Butter, soft (about 5 Tbsp)
  •     1 Egg
  •     1 cup Unbleached White Flour
  •     1 tsp Sea Salt
  •     1 tsp Baking Powder
  •     1 tsp Baking Soda

Directions

Step 1

Mix cereal and milk; allow to stand for 10 minutes while preheating oven to 400°F and assembling other ingredients. Grease a 12 serving muffin pan or line pan with paper liners.

Step 2

Combine and sift dry ingredients. Cream sugar, butter and egg together. Add dry ingredients and milk with cereal to butter mixture. Stir only until mixed.

Step 3

Spoon into prepared muffin pan. Bake at 400°F for 15 minutes.

Makes 12 muffins.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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