Charlees Kitchen 1

Food as Medicine Symposium: April 5-6, Portland

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Health

While it still seems like there is a big disconnect between how a person eats and how a person feels, we are making great strides towards better understanding of food as medicine. The benefits of healthy whole-foods continues to trend upward. We can find books, magazine articles, Facebook pages and even movies sharing the latest news as more and more people realize there’s a link between a poor diet and poor health.  Since 2011, our friends at National College of Natural Medicine (NCNM) have worked with us to share their expert nutrition knowledge with the Portland community through the ECO Project (“Ending Childhood Obesity”). There’s so much interest in learning about nutrition that they have created the Food As Medicine Institute, (FAMI), a community-education initiative dedicated to providing nutrition education—not only for healthcare providers but for the public, too.

To celebrate its official launch, FAMI will host its inaugural Food as Medicine Symposium at NCNM on April 5-6, featuring a keynote presentation by Bob Moore, Bob’s Red Mill founder: “Whole Grain Foods, Life Insurance You Eat.

Charlee's Kitchen at NCNM | Bob's Red Mill

The two-day event is geared to satisfy a variety of interests and discerning palates. Whether you’re a chef or an aspiring cook, a physician or other healthcare professional, a foodie or just someone curious learning practical tips about preparing tasty, good food—there’s something for everyone. Depending on the level of your interest, you can register for all or just part of the conference.

The public symposium is scheduled on Saturday, April 5, from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and will include workshops on “Death by Food Pyramid;” “Avoiding Inflammatory Foods & Cooking Methods;” “Strategies for Detoxification;” “Gluten-Free Nutrition and Avoiding Junk Foods;” “Breast Milk: The Original Superfood,” and more. Speakers will include some of the most renowned chefs and naturopathic physicians in the Northwest!

Charlee and Bob Moore at NCNM

The professional symposium, targeting healthcare practitioners, will take place Saturday and Sunday, April 5 and 6, from 8:30 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. Healthcare professionals of all stripes will gather for an in-depth examination of the role clinical nutrition plays in their patients’ state of health or disease. Practitioners will get a chance to augment the “clinical pearls” found in the kitchen to any treatment plan as they rediscover nutrition, the crucial foundation of natural medicine. NCNM has applied for 12 hours of continuing education units for the symposium.

Can’t attend, but you wish you could? No problem. Both segments will offer a live webinar! The webinars will be taped for anyone who can’t attend that day.

Click on this link to register or get more information!

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
Bob Birthday F

Happy 85th Birthday, Bob!

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Happy Birthday Bob 85 1

It’s Bob’s 85th birthday today. Doesn’t he look like he’s having a blast?

Help us wish him a happy birthday by leaving your birthday greetings in the comments.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
Cake

Bob’s 85th Birthday Bash

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Bob's 85th Birthday BashBirthday Details

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
Happy New Year Header

Happy New Year – Looking Back at 2013

by Cassidy Stockton in Behind the Scenes, Featured Articles

Happy New Year! Whether 2013 was a boom or a bust for you, all of us at Bob’s Red Mill want to wish you the very best for 2014! Here are some of our highlights for 2013!

2013 Small

January: After the loss of their beloved dog Annie in late 2012, Bob and Charlee Moore adopted Mandy, a 4 year old beagle. While we don’t get to see her at the Mill (it is a food facility, after all), hearing about her hijinks has brought many smiles to us at Bob’s Red Mill.

February: Bob celebrated his 84th birthday to much fanfare at our Whole Grain Store.

March: After months and months of hard work, we launched our Grains of Discovery line at Natural Foods Expo West (the nation’s leading natural food expo). While consumers didn’t hear about it until June, it was unveiled for retailers in March.

April: Among many highlights, Bob met Michael Moss, author of Salt, Sugar, Fat.

May: Let the pie baking begin! Though you may not have known why we were madly baking apple pie, we were busy testing our new Gluten Free Pie Crust Mix to have it ready for the 2013 holiday season.

June: To launch our Grains of Discovery line to consumers in June, Bob held a bash in New York for some of the country’s top media. While making his rounds in the Big Apple, Bob met Martha Stewart, much to their mutual delight.

July: To help you know more about our products and how to use them, Bob and team have been making product videos. Check out our full collection here.

August: Our Third Annual Spar for the Spurtle contest culminated in August with a cook-off of oat-y delights. Paula Todora took home the champion’s spurtle with her winning dish, Steel Your Heart Away Egg Rolls.

September: Finally, the secret is out on our Gluten Free Pie Crust Mix! Recipes upon recipes were developed and shared to arm you with the very best gluten free mix for all of your holiday pie baking needs.

October: We got back to our roots with some very fun promotions to support our oatmeal line. Toppings like “The Elvis” and “The Gilgamesh” inspired us to get creative with our oatmeal and try something new for breakfast.

November: Operations at Bob’s Red Mill halted for a few short minutes to celebrate a new cereal mixing machine. Yes, that is kind of a strange thing to celebrate, but  this line allows us to make your favorite cereals more efficiently with less waste and THAT is something to celebrate!

December: It was revealed that something BIG is coming in early 2014. Will Bob run for president? No. Will Bob star in a movie? No. Will it be fun? Yes. Will it be awesome? Yes. Can I tell you? Nope. You’ll just have to wait in see. All will be revealed in a few weeks.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
Grains-Of-Discovery-Map

Grains of Discovery World Launch Party

by Cassidy Stockton in Behind the Scenes, Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

We’ve been hinting about it for a few months and now it’s time for the big reveal… We are proud to present the Bob’s Red Mill Grains of Discovery!

We’ve taken some of your favorite whole grains like quinoa and millet and some of the more unknown grains like amaranth and teff and filled in their back story with a bit of their cultural history and recipes reminiscent of their origins. We hope you will join us in discovering all that can be delicious about these wonderful whole grains. The full line up includes Quinoa, Millet, Sorghum, Teff, Amaranth, Kamut®Khorasan Wheat, Spelt, Farro and Chia. We’ll be featuring each of these in the coming months showing you just how easy it is to enjoy something as exotic as teff and why you want to have farro on hand for your next dinner party.

In true Bob’s Red Mill style, ok, so that’s kind of a lie, this is not true Bob’s Red Mill style… our style is a little more jeans and t-shirts… in a totally unprecedented extravaganza, we’re having a launch party to celebrate the Grains of Discovery in New York City tomorrow night. This is not just any old party, either. We’re flying out ten of Portland’s top chefs (including our very own Sarah House) to create culinary masterpieces with each of these grains and show the world just how sophisticated these simple whole grains can be.

Join us on Twitter (#grainsofdiscovery) and Facebook tomorrow starting at 6 pm (Eastern) for updates from the party with pictures of the dishes, live messages from Bob and whatever else we can come up with. We wish each of you could join us, but we hope you’ll enjoy coming along for the virtual fun.

Here’s a rundown on the chefs and their dishes. Before you read on, please know that this is the extreme end of what these grains can be, we’re going to spend the rest of the summer showing you how family-friendly you can make these grains. You don’t have to be  a James Beard winner to enjoy these grains.

ScottLevant

Scott Snyder of Levant:  Dirty Kamut

NaomiBeastS

Naomi Pomeroy of Beast: Vegetable Bounty Quinoa Salad with Asian Vinaigrette

PascalMilwaukieKitchenandWineS

Pascal Sauton of Milwaukie Kitchen & Wine: Moroccan Farro with Braised Lamb Belly and Harissa Aioli

GregoryDepartureS

Gregory Gourdet of Departure: Chia Granola Crusted Squab, Sweet Corn Curry, Chia Jalapeno Madeleine

CathyNostranaS

Cathy Whims of Nostrana: Chilled Buttermilk and Spelt Soup

GregGabrielleOxS

Greg & Gabrielle Denton of Ox Restaurant: Ricotta Amarancini with Octopus Fra Diavolo & Amaranth Caviar

KevinEvoeS

Kevin Gibson of Evoe: Toasted Eggs with Millet Seed

VitalyImperialSVitaly Paley of Imperial: Sorghum Tamale, Moxie Braised Goat & Oxtail, Spicy Sorghum Salsa, Puffed Sorghum

sarahsift

Sarah House of Bob’s Red Mill: Teff Pudding Cakes with Coffee & Berbere

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
quinoa grain

Discover Quinoa

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

Let’s get one thing straight, right off the bat, quinoa is pronounced KEEN-WA, not Quin-OH-ah or Keen-Woo.

I like to call quinoa the gateway whole grain. It’s easy to cook, incredibly nutritious, endlessly versatile and tastes great too! Quinoa originates in South America where it was immensely popular because it was one of few crops that could survive in such high altitudes (10,000 – 20,000 feet above sea level). It could withstand frost, intense sun and the often dry conditions that characterized the Andean climate. It was also recognized for its superior nutritional qualities. For these reasons, it was dubbed “mother of all grains” by the Incas, so much so that it came to have spiritual significance for them. Many traditions and ceremonies surrounded the cultivation, harvest and consumption of quinoa.

Discover Quinoa

Quinoa is a “pseudo-grain”—actually a gluten-free seed, but used in cooking like a whole grain. This nutrient-rich grain is a wonderful source of complete protein, providing all of the essential amino acids. It is also a good source of dietary fiber. Naturally gluten free, this powerful little grain is a great addition to any diet, but is an ideal solution for those following a gluten free, vegan or vegetarian diet that are looking to increase their protein and fiber.

Quinoa is delicious on its own and the earthy flavor of quinoa makes it ideal for pilafs, soups and salads. Unlike many whole grains, quinoa takes very little time to prepare and can be substituted anywhere whole grains are used. It is a nutritious alternative to couscous and white rice in most recipes. Use it for a hot breakfast cereal or add uncooked quinoa to breads for a delightful crunch. Why be boring with macaroni salad for your next potluck? Our simply titled, Quinoa Salad is one of our most popular recipes and sure to impress your friends and prove your culinary expertise. Mix up your dinner menu with our Sopa de Quinoa, a South American soup that is sure to warm your insides and nourish your soul. No matter how you serve it, quinoa is a wonderful addition to your menu.

Watch this video to learn how to make perfect light and fluffy quinoa.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
Bob Feature

Perfect Steel Cut Oats

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

Bob tells us all about steel cut oats and shows us how to magically make more time in the day.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
header1

A Day in the Life of Bob Moore

by Cassidy Stockton in Behind the Scenes, Featured Articles

Ever wonder how Bob spends his day at the mill? I sat down with Bob last week to find out.

Between 6 and 6:30 am, Bob gets up and starts his day off with a bowl of one of our many hot cereals lovingly prepared by his wife, Charlee. He tops it off with half of a banana (split with Charlee, of course), skim milk, nuts, flaxseed meal and date pieces.

Bob and Charlee Baking MuffinsAround 7:30 am he arrives at the mill, where he starts his work day off with a cup of coffee (he always waits to have his coffee at the mill) and chats with people during the 8 am shift change. Then, he heads up to his office where he goes over his calendar with his assistant Nancy. There is not a day on his calendar that doesn’t have at least a few appointments and meetings. He typically spends the first part of the day greeting folks around the office and razzing whoever is lucky enough to be in his path.

At 10 am, he wanders downstairs to greet our tour guests (learn more about our tours here) and play a song on one of his two pianos (yes, we have two pianos in our mill).

Bob talks milling with Anoy

From there, he walks our plant, all seven acres of it. He stops by the shop, one of his favorite places in the mill to see what they’re working on and how each project is coming along. He visits our distribution warehouse and drops by the lab. There is always something new to see and someone he wants to catch up with. Working here, you quickly learn how much he cares about each of us. He knows our names and our families. Bob knows something special about each of us, whether we like fly fishing or are working on rebuilding a car, if we just got back from an Alaskan cruise or whether we play in a band on the weekends. It’s uncanny, really.

Bob and the guys in the shop. Not one of them is this serious, ever.

By 12:30 pm, he’s walked the plant, visited various people, dropped in on a meeting or two and is ready for lunch at our Whole Grain Store. Nearly every day, he orders two eggs and steamed spinach with a side of corn grits. Occasionally, he’ll order a sandwich made on our whole grain bread. He talks to customers and takes pictures with their kids.

By 2 pm he’s back at the mill where he sits in on more meetings, if required, or catches up on the day’s events. A day is never complete without a trip to our Purchasing Department to learn about different issues that affect our supply of grains.

Around 4 pm, he’ll wander back downstairs to chat with folks during the shift change. He feels it is the best time to catch up with people he might not otherwise see during the day. From there, he sits at his piano with Nancy and plays a few pieces with her (and that is why we have two pianos).

bob and nancy

He usually knocks off at 5 pm and heads home to Charlee for a delicious meal and a quiet evening at home.

That, folks, is what Bob does Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5 pm.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
corn

Our Policy Regarding GMOs

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Health, Whole Grains 101

BobfieldWith all of the attention swirling around genetically modified organisms (GMOs), we’ve been getting a heap of questions about our products and GMOs. Rest assured, at Bob’s Red Mill, we are committed to providing identity preserved products exclusively.

“Identity preserved” means that the seeds that were planted to grow our crops came from a non-GMO source. We work constantly with our farmers and suppliers to ensure that the ingredients we procure are non-GMO. In fact, each of our corn, rice, soy and flax suppliers is required to sign a statement which affirms that their ingredients come from non-GMO sources.

Planting identity preserved seed is just the first step in ensuring that products are non-GMO. That is why we have recently procured state-of-the-art testing equipment that allows us to begin our own in-house testing of our products. Our goal is to implement a testing protocol that is acute and prolific.

We hope you share our enthusiasm for keeping natural foods natural. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments section.

To Your Good Health,

Bob's signature

 

*UPDATE: June 3, 2013

As purveyors of all-natural wheat, the articles published recently reporting the isolated discovery of GMO wheat in Oregon is an important issue for Bob’s Red Mill and we are taking it very seriously. Bob’s Red Mill maintains, as it has for over a decade, a strict policy which mandates that each and every one of our grain suppliers provide us with grain that was grown exclusively from Non-GMO seed. To support our policy, Bob’s Red Mill requires that each of our suppliers sign an agreement committing to comply with that policy.

In light of the report that GMO wheat was detected in Oregon, from where Bob’s Red Mill purchases only a relatively small amount of wheat, the company has begun the process of immediately contacting each of its Oregon wheat suppliers for confirmation that they only supply identity-preserved, non-GMO wheat.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article:
biscuit2

Bob’s Favorite Buttermilk Biscuit Recipe

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

When asked what his favorite whole grain food was, Bob was quick to tell me “any heavy, whole grain bread- especially if it’s toasted and has butter. The heavier the better.” Of course, as soon as he finished that thought, he started singing the praises of our bakery’s scratch buttermilk biscuits. These, he said, were a close second when topped with Marion berry jam. If you can’t get into our store, you can bake these amazing, fluffy, flaky biscuits at home!

Biscuits buttermilk whole wheat

Bob’s Red Mill Bakery Buttermilk Biscuits

Directions

Step 1
Preheat oven to 450°F.

Step 2
Mix unbleached white flour, whole wheat flour, baking powder, baking soda, sugar and sea salt thoroughly.

Step 3
Add butter and mix until evenly distributed.

Step 4
Add buttermilk slowly, mixing until a dough forms that is slightly sticky.

Step 5
Roll dough out on a heavily floured surface, sprinkle on 1 – 2 tablespoons of flaxseed meal, and cut with a 2-1/2 – 3 inch cutter.

Step 6
Place biscuits on a baking sheet and bake in oven for 10 – 15 minutes or until golden brown.

Makes 2 dozen biscuits.
*To make your biscuits look like the picture above, omit the flaxseed meal.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
Share this article: