Angel Food Cake

Gluten Free Angel Food Cake

by Sarena Shasteen in Gluten Free, Recipes

In truth, I thought for a minute about sharing a recipe for a side dish that we all love around here during the holidays, but let’s be honest, this time of year calls for sweet treats. The holiday season is a time when people come together to share love, friendship, laughter and a whole bunch of good food. This time of year always focuses on rich heavier foods at gatherings. So, to balance that out, I love keeping our desserts lighter in texture and this particular recipe is a little lighter on the calories too (sshhh, nobody has to know that, but us).Gluten Free Angel Food Cake | Bob's Red Mill

Today, I’m sharing one of my and my family’s all time favorite recipes I developed for Angel Food Cake. I love this cake during the winter months for many reasons, but one main reason is because I love that it actually looks wintery when you add seven minute icing and coconut to the top. A little chocolate sauce and/or raspberry sauce are great additions to the top, too, for presentation and flavor. Actually, the topping options are endless. When I serve this cake for a party, I like to set up a little build your own topping bar so my guest can have fun with the flavor combinations (shaved chocolate, fruit sauces, nuts). This Angel Food Cake is light, fluffy, sweet and full of flavor. The addition of coconut flour doesn’t really give the cake a coconut flavor, however it does add a richness to the sweet taste of this tender airy cake. I hope you and your guests love this Angel Food Cake as much as we love it!

Happy Holidays from my family to yours.

Gluten Free Angel Food Cake | Bob's Red Mill

Gluten Free Angel Food Cake

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In your mixer, combine 1/2 cup sugar, water, egg whites, cream of tatar and salt.  Mix until foamy and starting to form soft peaks.  Slowly add the remaining sugar to the egg whites as it is still mixing on high speed.  In a separate bowl, combine the flours and baking powder, mix to combine.  When the egg whites have formed stiff peaks, fold the flours into the egg whites in small batches.  Don’t deflate the egg whites.  Pour into an angel food cake pan and bake for 50 minutes.  It will be slightly browned, springy and a toothpick will come out clean! Allow to cool upside down. Once cool, carefully cut around the edges of the angel food cake pan to release the cake. Serve with your favorite toppings!

Extra Light and Fluffy Seven Minute Icing

(makes about 3 cups)

  • 3 large Egg Whites or 9 TBSP
  • 2/3 cup Sugar
  • 1 dropper vanilla NuNatural Stevia
  • pinch of Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Cream of Tarter

In a large stainless-steel bowl, combine the egg whites with the sugar, salt and cream of tartar. Set the bowl over a saucepan filled with about 2 inches of simmering water. Beat the egg whites at high speed until stiff and glossy, about 7 minutes. Remove the bowl from the heat, add the vanilla stevia and continue to beat at high speed until the frosting is cool to the touch, about 5 minutes longer. Use the frosting immediately.

Sarena Shasteen: The Non Dairy QueenSarena Shasteen has been an avid health food and fitness enthusiast from an early age. She holds a degree in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Atlanta, a certification in Fitness Nutrition and is a certified Fitness Trainer from International Sport Science Association (ISSA). Becoming a Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition has been a lifelong goal of hers. Sarena enjoys helping others reach their health goals by teaching them that health and fitness are not only achieved in the gym, but also through fun everyday activities. Now a food writer, recipe developer, personal chef,  Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition, she enjoys sharing with others that healthy living can be fun and delicious. Keep up with her at The Non Dairy Queen and on Facebook and Twitter.

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Cheese Crisps F

Meatless Mondays: Cheese Crisps

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

In honor of all the kiddos who are heading back to school this week, and all the parents who just collectively breathed a sigh of relief, we present cheese crisps. An easy, delicious cracker for lunch boxes and after school snacking. These crackers use coconut flour and brown rice flour for a light, crisp cracker that is deceptively gluten free. Take this recipe for a spin, then try variations with different cheeses like Pepper Jack or Smoked Gouda. Careful, though, these are addictive and it’s likely your first batch won’t even make it to Monday’s sack lunch.

Cheese Crisps | Bob's Red Mill

Cheese Crisps

Directions

Step 1

Heat oven to 275°F .

Step 2

Place melted and cooled butter, egg and water in a food processor. Add flours, salt and cheese, and blend until incorporated.

Step 3

Place mixture into a bowl. Add flaxseeds and mix by hand until a soft dough forms.

Step 4

Turn out onto a board dusted with brown rice flour. Roll to about 1/16-inch thick and cut into bite size pieces.

Step 5

Distribute pieces onto a parchment covered dark cookie sheet.

Bake for 30-35 minutes, rotating cookie sheet halfway through baking.  Crackers will be golden and hard when done.

Yields about 50 bite size crackers.

 

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Georgia Peach Pie Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Georgia Peach Pie Cookies

by Sarena Shasteen in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

I know a lot of people get scared introducing coconut flour into their baking so I wanted to share my recipe for Georgia Peach Pie Cookies today. This recipe uses enough coconut flour to baby step your way into baking with coconut flour in more of your recipes. Trust me when I say, you don’t want to skip that part in these little gems. I use coconut flour in most of my gluten free dessert baking. I find that if gives my recipes a subtle hint of extra sweetness and really enhances the flavors in my treats without adding a heavy coconut flavor when that’s not what I’m looking for.

Georgia Peach Pie Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

I am so excited that Spring has finally decided to show up on my side of the world! The warmer weather has me ready to throw on my bathing suit and prop my feet up while laying by the lake reading a good book. It also has me thinking about my favorite things to bake during the Spring and Summer! I always have baking on the mind, well, to be honest, I always have food on my mind, but baking is definitely my favorite thing to do when it comes to food. My favorite fruit during the summer time is peaches! I’m a Georgia girl through and through when it comes to celebrating peach season! I get so excited every year when the local peaches start popping up in the grocery stores. I love walking by that section of the store and smelling the sweet aroma of these beautiful jewels of Georgia. I’m a fruit girl when it comes to treats anyway, so when I bake during the warmer months, I love to highlight the season’s best fruits!

Georgia Peach Pie Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

These Georgia Peach Pie Cookies are a buttery vanilla shortbread base with a peachy center. They are crisp on the outside and filled with a gooey peach center with chunks of fresh peaches to highlight my Peach State! These cookies are perfect served on their own or even better served as a mini pie with a scoop of homemade vanilla ice cream. YUM!

Georgia Peach Pie Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

 Georgia Peach Pie Cookies

(Makes 13 cookies)

  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh Peaches (about 3 1/2 oz), very small pieces
  • 4 Tbsp Peach Preserves
  • 1/4 cup Coconut Flour
  • 1/4 cup Cornstarch
  • 1/2 cup White Rice Flour
  • 1/3 cup Raw Sugar
  • 1/8 tsp Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1/4 cup Soy Free Earth Balance (or butter)
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 tsp pure Vanilla Extract
  • 1-2 Tbsp Almond Milk (only if needed to bring the dough together)
  • 3 tsp Raw Sugar, reserved for topping

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a small bowl, mix together the chopped peaches and preserves. Set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flours, cornstarch, sugar, salt and baking powder. Cut the butter into the dry mixture until it resembles course crumbs. Next add the egg and vanilla to the flour butter mixture. Stir until the dough comes together. Add a tablespoon of milk at a time only if needed to bring the dough together. Using a medium cookie scoop, scoop the mixture onto a parchment lined baking sheet. Press the dough in the center to flatten while leaving a lip on the edge to hold in the filling. Once the dough is ready, evenly distribute the filling into the dough rounds (about 3 tsp each). Sprinkle each cookie with the remaining raw sugar. Bake 12-15 minutes or until the cookies are browned on the edges. Remove from the cookie sheet and allow to cool.

Georgia Peach Pie Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Sarena Shasteen: The Non Dairy QueenSarena Shasteen has been an avid health food and fitness enthusiast from an early age. She holds a degree in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Atlanta, a certification in Fitness Nutrition and is a certified Fitness Trainer from International Sport Science Association (ISSA). Becoming a Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition has been a lifelong goal of hers. Sarena enjoys helping others reach their health goals by teaching them that health and fitness are not only achieved in the gym, but also through fun everyday activities. Now a food writer, recipe developer, personal chef,  Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition, she enjoys sharing with others that healthy living can be fun and delicious. Keep up with her at The Non Dairy Queen and on Facebook and Twitter.

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Coconut Flour Crepes  | Bob's Red Mill

Simple Coconut Flour Crepes

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

We weren’t sure what to call these little flatbreads, but finally decided on crepes. They are light, thin and perfectly flavored to go with sweet or savory toppings. This recipe is lightly adapted from a Grain-Free Tortilla recipe on Against All Grain and we recommend checking out Danielle’s beautiful blog for more grain-free recipes using coconut flour and other paleo-friendly ingredients. Top these with smoked salmon and cream cheese for a savory crepe or try fresh fruit and a drizzle of honey for something sweet.

These also make a great replacement for traditional wheat or corn-based tortillas. Use them for tacos, enchiladas or even as a sandwich wrap. There are endless ways to enjoy these and keep your gluten-free, low calorie or low carb diet on track.

Coconut Flour Crepes  | Bob's Red Mill

Coconut Flour Flatbreads/Tortillas/Crepes

Recipe by Sarah House for the Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen

Prep Time: 15 minutes | 
Cook Time:  10 minutes |Yield: 8 servings

Step 1

In a small bowl, combine non-dairy milk and lemon juice and let sit for about 5 minutes.

Step 2

In a medium bowl, sift together Bob’s Red Mill Coconut Flour, baking soda and sea salt.

Step 3

Add milk mixture and egg whites to dry ingredients and whisk well.  Let sit for 10 minutes to thicken.

Step 4

Preheat an 8-inch skillet or crepe pan over medium-low heat.  Spray with pan spray then pour in ¼ cup of batter.  Quickly swirl the batter around the hot pan to make a thin layer which covers the entire bottom of the pan.  Cook until the center is set, about 1 minute.

Step 5

Loosen the edges with a spatula and gently turn over; let cook an additional 45 – 60 seconds.  Remove to a warm platter to prepare the remaining batter, making sure to spray the pan with pan spray between batches.

Each crepe contains: Calories: 70, Calories from Fat: 15, Total Fat: 1.5 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 250 mg, Total Carbohydrate: 5 g, Dietary Fiber: 3 g, Sugars: 1 g, Protein: 9 g, Vitamin A: 0%, Vitamin C: 0%, Calcium: 2%, Iron: 6%*

*Calculated using unsweetened, plain almond milk.

Coconut Flour  | Bob's Red Mill

 

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Almond Meal Bread | Bob's Red Mill

Almond Meal Bread

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

How does one enjoy bread while on a low carb diet? That’s a question we have been striving to answer. Our solution? This lovely Almond Meal Bread. It may look like a loaf of banana bread, but I assure you it’s definitely not banana bread. It has a lovely whole grain texture and savory flavor, despite being made from almond and coconut flour, perfect for sandwiches, toast or straight-up snacking. Yes, it uses a lot of eggs. That’s one of the trade-offs for leaving out the gluten and the starch in this recipe. It’s a great recipe for those looking to reduce their carb intake or are following the paleo diet… or just have a bag of almond meal lying around needing to be put to good use. Enjoy!

Almond Meal Bread | Bob's Red Mill

Almond Meal Bread

Contributed by:  Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time:  35 – 45 minutes | Yield: 12 servings | Total Carbs per serving: 8g, Net Carbs: 4g

Step 1

Preheat oven to 400°F.  Line an 8×4- or 9×5-inch loaf pan with parchment paper and spray lightly with pan spray.

Step 2

Whip eggs until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.  Meanwhile, sift together Bob’s Red Mill Natural Almond Meal, Coconut Flour, baking powder and salt.

Step 3

While the eggs are still whipping, slowly stream in the melted and cooled coconut oil.  Fold in the dry ingredients.

Step 4

Scoop batter into the prepared pan and smooth top.

Step 5

Bake until a tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 35 – 45 minutes.

Step 6

Let cool completely before removing from the baking pan.

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Coconut Flour

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

Coconut is all the rage these days—coconut oil, coconut milk, coconut sugar—if it has coconut in it, it must be good for you. For the most part that is true and coconut flour is no exception. It’s tremendously rich in dietary fiber and very low in carbohydrates. These two factors combine to make a product that is especially ideal for those who need to be conscious of their blood sugar and who are following a low carbohydrate diet. It’s naturally gluten free, so it’s becoming very popular with those on a gluten free diet. This is one of the most difficult and confusing Bob’s Red Mill products to use. It’s not impossible and it is totally worth learning how to use it, but this product does not behave like a typical flour and presents some unique challenges in baking.

What is it? Wednesday: Coconut Flour | Bob's Red Mill

How is it made? Coconut flour is made from the flesh of mature coconuts after coconut oil has been extracted. The remaining coconut contains only about 15% of the oil from the original coconut. The flesh is dried at temperatures above 118°F to eliminate any microbes and is held at 179°F for approximately 30 minutes, which means this product is not considered raw by most raw foodists.

Does it taste like coconut? Because there is no milk and most of the oils have been removed, coconut flour does not have a strong coconut flavor. I’d be lying if I said it was void of any coconut flavor, but it is quite mild and would be masked by any strong flavor like chocolate, coffee, garlic or almond. It’s similar to coconut oil, actually, there is a hint of the coconut, but it’s not like baking with ground up shredded coconut.

Does it contain sulfites? No. I cannot vouch for all coconut flour, but our coconut flour does not contain sulfites or any other preservatives.

How do you use it? That’s the real meat of the issue, isn’t it? How do you use such a unique flour? The single, most important thing to remember about coconut flour is that it is very high in fiber and requires a lot of liquid. More than you would think, actually. If you look at coconut flour recipes, they often call for a lot of eggs (I’m talking 6 to 8 whole eggs for a single recipe).  At first glance, you’ll think it’s an error and it can’t possibly need that many eggs. The thing is, though, it really does. The eggs help replace the gluten and balance out the high amount of fiber. If you are egg-free, try The Spunky Coconut. She has many recipes that are egg-free.

You’ll be relieved to know that there are so many wonderful food bloggers out there experimenting with this product and finding ways around the use of a dozen eggs for a single recipe. They’re getting creative and coming up with recipes like Chocolate Glazed Strawberry Donuts (Cara’s Cravings), Chocolate Marbled Cupcakes (Jeanette’s Healthy Living) and Vanilla Coconut Poundcake (Non-Dairy Queen, below).

Vanilla Coconut Poundcake

Here are tips from our Test Kitchen:

  • Store coconut flour in the fridge or freezer for the longest shelf life.
  • Coconut flour can replace up to 20% of the total flour in a recipe.  Liquid will need to be increased by 20% as well.
  • It is recommended that you use an equal part coconut flour to liquid.
  • Coconut flour is very high in fiber and will absorb large amounts of liquid.  These batters may not resemble the same batter made with wheat flour.
  • Increasing the fat in a 100% coconut flour recipe will keep the product moist without having to add excessive amounts of liquid.
  • Some 100% coconut flour recipes may appear too runny.  Let the batter sit for a few minutes to absorb the liquid.  The liquid will be absorbed further during baking.
  • Reducing the sugar or granulated sweetener will make the final product drier and crumbly.
  • Always sift coconut flour before using.
  • To store baked goods with significant amounts of coconut flour, wrap loosely in plastic.  If no air is allowed to circulate, the baked good may become soggy.

My single tip for getting to know coconut flour? TRY AN EXISTING COCONUT FLOUR RECIPE. Don’t reinvent the wheel. Use a tried and true recipe. We have a few on our website and there are so many amazing bloggers out there doing a great job with it. Check out All Day I Dream About Food, Jeanette’s Healthy Living, Cara’s Cravings and The Spunky Coconut for some inspiration.

Finally, find more great tips from Jeanette’s Healthy Living and watch this video for even more insight.

Finally, we received some great customer questions on Facebook and I’ll try to address some of them here. These are the questions that I wasn’t sure how to work into the narrative.

Coconut Flour and Browning: Some customers have found that baked goods made with coconut flour brown more easily. While we have not found this to be true here, we think this could have something to do with the natural sugar in the flour.

Coconut flour is gluten free, do I need to use Xanthan Gum? Yes and no. If you are baking a 100% coconut flour recipe with a bevy of eggs, it is likely that you will not need xanthan gum. If you are adding coconut flour to a gluten free blend or are not using a recipe heavy in eggs, xanthan gum might be necessary.

How many carbs does it contain per serving? A 2 Tbsp serving of Coconut Flour contains 8 grams of Carbohydrates (3 grams net carbs). Keep in mind that you use far less coconut flour than conventional wheat flour in recipes.

I have a coconut allergy, will I react to coconut flour? Unlike coconut oil, coconut flour contains coconut protein and will cause an allergic reaction if you are sensitive to coconuts.

I hope this clears up some of the mysteries about coconut flour. Have more questions? Leave them in the comments and I’ll try to get you an answer right away.

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Coconut Flour

A Little More About Coconut Flour {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

What in Bob’s Red Mill Is Coconut Flour?

Do you ever hear some people talk about different kinds of flour, new seeds, or see a word on a menu that you have no idea what it really is? Sometimes when I walk into the “natural foods” section of the grocery store, I see things that look pretty cool, but sometimes just keep walking because I’m not sure what they are or how I’m supposed to use them. I just wonder “What in the world is that? And how am I supposed to use it?” When I heard about coconut flour, that was exactly how I felt, except for this time, with Bob’s help, I have done some research, experimented with some recipes, and feel like I know a little more about coconut flour. Hopefully I can share what I’ve learned with you so that you can add it to your shopping list and add a little healthy touch of coconut to your family’s diet instead of walking on by.Coconut Flour

What is coconut flour?

Coconut flour is a soft, flour like product made from the pulp of a coconut. It’s actually a by-product made during the coconut milk making process. When making coconut milk, you have to soak coconut meat. That pulp is then dried out and ground into this powdery flour.

What are the health benefits of coconut flour?

Many people look to coconut flour to help create gluten free baked goods. Gluten free is definitely a great reason to use coconut flour, but that’s not all it has to offer. Coconut flour is also extremely high in fiber with almost double the amount found in wheat bran. In just 2 tablespoons of coconut flour, there are 5 grams of fiber (20% of the recommended daily value) and 8 grams of carbs. Mayo Clinic says a diet with plenty of fiber can help keep you regular, help maintain weight, and lower your risk of diabetes and heart disease.

How do you cook with coconut flour?

Cooking with coconut flour can be a little tricky. I have had a couple of recipes completely bomb. Once you get the hang of it though, it’s a super easy way to add nutrients and fiber to a ton of dishes. There are two things to keep in mind when working with coconut flour. Since it is so high in fiber, it requires a ton more moisture. There is also no equal substitution when working with coconut flour. You can usually substitute about 20% of the flour in a recipe for coconut flour and add at least 20% more liquid. My personal experience also says that when working with baked goods, you should also add about 3-5 eggs for every cup of coconut flour you are using. You can also add a tablespoon or two of coconut flour to sauces and gravies. It is a little clumpy so take your time when adding it in. Coconut flour has a naturally sweet flavor that can really add a nice little something extra to dishes.

Honestly, when you’re beginning to bring coconut flour into your cooking, stick to already established recipes. Once you start to get a little more comfortable, you can begin to experiment. I speak from experience… botched recipes can be costly and a little disheartening. Practice with some great recipes online first. You can even check out my first great coconut flour recipe success: Whole Wheat Coconut Blueberry Muffins.

Resources for More on Coconut Flour

–          Mayo Clinic article on benefits of high fiber diet

–          Nourished Kitchen: A great blog with tips on baking with coconut flour

–          Livestrong article on the benefits of coconut flour

–          Bob’s Red Mill coconut flour facts

–          Bob’s Red Mill Hangout on Google+: Tips for Baking with Coconut Flour

About Ashley – Ashley is a mom, wife, sister, daughter, and friend working to navigate through the mysterious world of Mommyia. Read more about her adventures at Momicles and follow her @Momicles2010.

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brunch2

Easter Brunch Inspiration

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Who doesn’t love a good brunch? Easter and Mother’s Day are classic brunch holidays, but you could really put together a brunch any time and people would enjoy it. Easter seems like a wonderful reason to break out of the mold and try something new. We’ve pulled together some of our favorite brunch recipes to inspire you. These are all delicious, fairly easy to prepare and make use of whole grains. Cheers!

Lemon Blueberry CakeLemon Blueberry Coffee Cake (GF) from the Queen of Quinoa, Alyssa Rimmer

Caramelized Banana & Chia Pancakes

Caramelized Banana & Chia Pancakes

Raspberry Oatmeal Dumplings

Raspberry Oatmeal Dumplings

sweet potato kale black bean breakfast pizza

Sweet Potato, Kale and Black Bean Breakfast Pizza (GF) from Cara Lyons of Cara’s Cravings

Chocolate Cherry Scones

Chocolate Cherry Scones from Diane of Created by Diane

Whole Grain Cornbread Quiche

Whole Grain Cornbread Quiche from Julia of The Roasted Root

CouscousBreakfastPilaf

Vanilla Berry Whole Wheat Couscous Breakfast Pilaf from Faith of An Edible Mosaic

Sesame Ginger Spelt Waffles - Lorna Sass

Sesame Ginger Spelt Waffles from Lorna Sass

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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flour

Baking with Coconut Flour: Google Plus Hangout

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

Join us on March 27th at 12 pm (EST) for a chat about baking with coconut flour. Jeanette Chen, of Jeanette’s Healthy Living, will be discussing the ins and outs of this unique flour with several top food bloggers and our very own Sarah House. Come join the fun and ask questions (we’re also giving away some fun prizes)!

RSVP and get event info here.

If you’re not on Google Plus, it’s very easy to sign up- all you need is a Google account. If you can’t make it, we’ll post the complete hangout video after the chat.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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flour

National Flour Month: Gluten Free Flour Primer {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

This is our third post in our series on the different flours we produce. Week one was wheat flours, week two was low carb flours

millstone

Baking without gluten can be a little bit tricky, but with the right combinations of flour and starch, baked goods can be just as delicious as their gluten-filled counterparts. Our guide is not going to tell you which flours to combine when, but it will help you understand what each flour is made out of and what it brings to the table. Even though they aren’t true flours, we’ll also cover a few starches. We will be covering bean flours next week, even though they are gluten free flours.

Some notes:

Gluten Free Flours from Bob's Red Mill

Almond Meal: Almonds are notoriously healthy nuts providing a good amount of manganese and vitamin E , as well as a healthy serving of monounsaturated fats in each 1/4 cup serving. Not only do almonds have a healthy boost of protein, they are also very low in carbohydrates and naturally gluten free. Replacing 25% of the flour in your baking with almond meal will add wonderful texture and flavor while reducing the total carbohydrates.  Although it has a lightly sweet flavor, almond meal can also be used in savory applications. Use almond meal in place of bread crumbs in meatballs, or as a coating for chicken and fish. Browse recipes for almond meal here.

Amaranth Flour: Amaranth flour has a pleasant, nutty flavor and can be used for up to 25% of the flour in your baked goods. Amaranth flour is a source of complete protein—it contains all the essential amino acids, including lysine, which is lacking in most grains. High in fiber and a good source of magnesium and iron, Amaranth flour is a spectacular addition to your diet. Browse recipes for amaranth flour here.

Arrowroot StarchArrowroot Starch is also known as arrowroot flour or arrowroot powder. This starch comes from the root of the plant Maranta arundinacea. Used in combination with other gluten free flours, arrowroot provides some thickening and stability to gluten free baked goods. It can be used in place of corn starch one for one. It is best to add arrowroot starch at the end of the cooking process because extended exposure to high heat will cause it to lose its thickening abilities. Browse recipes for arrowroot starch here.

Black Bean Flour: Bean flours will be covered next week.

Buckwheat Flour (not produced in our gluten free facility): Buckwheat flour is milled from the pyramid-shaped groats of the buckwheat plant. The dark color of buckwheat flour comes from having additional hulls of buckwheat milled alongside the creamy groats. It is high in magnesium and fiber and has a  unique flavor that lends itself to pancakes and breads. Buckwheat flour can replace up to 20% of the flour in your recipe. Buckwheat flour is naturally gluten free, but we do not produce it in our gluten free facility. Our buckwheat flour is raw.

Coconut Flour: Organic coconut flour is a delicious, healthy alternative to wheat and other grain flours. Ground from dried, defatted coconut meat, coconut flour is high in fiber and low in digestible carbohydrates. A single 2 Tbsp serving of coconut flour delivers 5 grams of fiber. The light coconut flavor allows coconut flour to blend seamlessly into sweet or savory baked goods. It makes a wonderful coating for chicken, fish or other proteins in place of regular flour or cornmeal. Because of its high fiber content, baking with coconut flour is a unique experience. Coconut flour requires an equal ratio of liquid to flour for best results. Coconut flour can replace up to 20% of the flour in a recipe, but you will need to add an equal amount of liquid to compensate.  We recommend following a recipe designed for coconut flour when getting started. Luckily, we have many recipes to experiment with in our recipe section. Coconut flour is unsweetened and does not contain sulfites.

Corn Flour: Milled from high quality, California corn, our whole grain corn flour has a mild, sweet flavor perfect for all kinds of gluten free baking. We produce a regular and a gluten free version—be sure to check the label for our gluten free symbol. Use corn flour for tortillas, breads, muffins, cakes and cookies. The fine grind, allows corn flour to blend seamlessly into baked goods. Corn flour can replace up to 20% of the flour in your recipe. Browse our corn flour recipes here.

Fava Bean Flour: Bean flours will be covered next week.

Garbanzo Bean Flour: Bean flours will be covered next week.

Garbanzo and Fava Bean Flour Blend: Bean flours will be covered next week.

Masa Harina: Masa Harina is a very special type of flour and we now offer it as gluten free (be sure to look for our gluten free symbol). Milled from corn that has had the germ removed and been soaked in lime (calcium oxide, not lime juice). This flour is ideal for making tortillas, but can be used the same way as our regular corn flour.

Green Pea FlourBean flours will be covered next week.

Hazelnut Meal: Bob’s Red Mill Hazelnut Meal is ground from whole Oregon hazelnuts, or filberts. Hazelnuts are often overlooked for their nutritional value, but these healthy nuts provide a good amount of vitamin E and a healthy serving of monounsaturated fats in each 1/4 cup serving. You can replace up to 30% of the flour in your baking with hazelnut meal to add wonderful texture and flavor.  Hazelnut meal will bring a rich, buttery flavor to your baking while adding an enticing aroma that can only come from high quality hazelnuts. Hazelnut meal can be used in savory applications, as well. Use hazelnut meal in place of bread crumbs in meatballs, or as a coating for chicken and fish.  Our hazelnut meal is not blanched.

Millet Flour:Millet flour has a light, mild flavor, making it perfect for sweet or savory baking. Replace up to 25% of the flour in your recipe with millet flour for added nutrition. Millet is an excellent source of fiber, manganese, phosphorus and magnesium. In our opinion, millet flour is often overlooked in gluten free baking—it adds whole grain nutrition and has a mild flavor, not something you find often with gluten free flours. Browse our millet flour recipes here

Oat Flour: Oat flour is another overlooked, but incredibly nutritious gluten free flour. We produce a regular and a gluten free version—be sure to check the label for our gluten free symbol. Made from gluten free oats, our gluten free oat flour has the subtle sweet flavor of whole grain oats. Oat flour can replace up to 20% of the flour in your recipe. Oat flour is perfect for pie crusts, pancakes, muffins and more. Browse our oat flour recipes here.

Potato Flour: Now here is a tricky flour. Potato flour is NOT the same as potato starch. Potato flour can be used to give baked goods a moist crumb, but it is not really the most ideal baking flour. It is made from dehydrated Russet potatoes. Potato flour has a stronger potato flavor than potato starch, but will still work well to thicken sauces and soups. This flour is best left for potato soups, potato bread and other savory items. Browse our potato flour recipes here.

Potato Starch: Potato starch is an incredibly versatile starch used in many gluten free recipes. With no potato flavor, potato starch can be used to thicken in place of corn starch (use 1-1/4 Tbsp potato starch for 1 Tbsp corn starch) or added to baked goods to help retain moisture and give a better crumb. Potato starch will thicken at higher temperatures than corn starch, which makes it great for pie fillings and sauces. Browse our potato starch recipes here.

Quinoa Flour: We’re going to just say it up front- quinoa flour has a little bit of a, well, quinoa taste to it. Earthy is a good way to describe it. That does not make it a bad flour to bake with, just one that you want to use in savory applications or with other strong flavors, like chocolate or lemon. Quinoa is very high in protein and is a great way to increase the protein of your baked good. Quinoa flour will also improve the moisture of your baked good and help produce a good crumb. You can replace up to 25% of your flour with quinoa, although some people find it to be a great stand alone gluten free flour for particular recipes (like this one for quinoa tortillas). Browse our quinoa flour recipes here.

Brown Rice Flour: An absolute staple in gluten free baking, brown rice flour is incredibly versatile. You can thicken sauces with it and use it for coating fish and other proteins, as well as produce breads, cakes and noodles. Our brown rice flour is stone ground from whole grain California brown rice. Some people find brown rice flour to be slightly gritty, but many find it preferable to bean flours. Browse our brown rice flour recipes here.

White Rice Flour: The refined version of brown rice flour, white rice flour can be used interchangeably with brown rice flour. White rice flour can be used to bake cakes, cookies, breads and more, as well as thicken sauces and coat fish and other proteins. Our white rice flour is stone ground from California white rice. As with brown rice flour, some people find white rice flour to be slightly gritty, but many find it preferable to bean flours. Browse our white rice flour recipe here.

Sweet White Rice Flour: Increasing in popularity, sweet rice flour is excellent for thickening sauces and coating proteins, like white rice flour. But don’t let that fool you- this flour is much higher in starch than regular white rice flour. This flour is used more like a starch in baking, adding moisture to baked goods. It is not sweet, despite its name, but it is often used for desserts and is the main ingredient for making the Japanese dessert, mochi. We find that people are using this more and more in gluten free baking to help bind the baked goods. Browse our sweet white rice flour recipes here.

Sorghum Flour: Sorghum flour is one of our favorite gluten free flours. It is probably the closest to approximating a wheat-like flavor and texture of the gluten free flours. It has a light flavor and can be used for every kind of gluten free baking. Use in combination with other gluten free flours for delicious, whole grain baked goods. Browse our sorghum flour recipes here.

Soy Flour: (not produced in our gluten free facility): Our soy flour is milled from whole, raw soy beans. This flour is a great source of complete protein, as well as a good source of fiber, calcium, iron, magnesium and phosphorus. You can replace up to 30% of the flour in your recipe with soy flour. Soy flour is naturally gluten free, however we do not produce it in our gluten free facility. Baked goods made with soy flour tend to brown more quickly, so it is best to use a recipe designed for soy flour or to keep a close eye on your baking when using it.

Tapioca Flour: Milled from cassava root, our tapioca flour can be used interchangeably with tapioca starch. Tapioca flour is an excellent thickener in sauces and can replace corn starch (use 2 Tbsp tapioca flour for each 1 Tbsp corn starch). Tapioca flour helps bind gluten free recipes and improves the texture of baked goods. Tapioca helps add crispness to crusts and chew to baked goods. Use in combination with other gluten free flours for best results. Browse our tapioca flour recipes here.

Teff Flour: Like quinoa flour, teff flour has a distinctive teff flavor. Earthy and nutty, teff flour makes an excellent addition to baked goods and is the main ingredient in the Ethiopian flat bread Injera. Teff flour can replace up to 20% of the flour in your recipe. It is an incredibly nutritious flour, so adding a small amount to your baked goods will boost nutrition while providing a unique, slightly sweet flavor. Browse our teff flour recipes here.

White Bean Flour: Bean flours will be covered next week.

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{Giveaway}

We’d like to give one lucky reader a set of our gluten free flours- brown rice flour, sweet rice flour, sorghum flour, oat flour, corn flour, tapioca flour and potato starch. To enter, simply follow the directions in the app below. We’ll pick a winner at random from all who enter by 12:01 am on 03/27/13.

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About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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