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Tips for a Dairy-Free and Gluten-free Pie Crust

by Guest in Gluten Free, Recipes

Being on a gluten-free diet can be hard but luckily companies like Bob’s Red Mill (which I’ll refer to as Bob’s) are busy creating flour blends and mixes that can easily take the place of your all-purpose flours. In recent years, our family has had to eat gluten-free and dairy-free, so things like butter-laden pie crusts were a thing of the past.

I use pie crust to make pies like pumpkin, apple, and peach-raspberry and even dishes like chicken pot pie. The only difference is that for a savory pie, you will not top the crust with sugar.

If you have had any trouble making a dairy-free crust, I’m here to help. The explanations  below are lengthy but I explain what to do and not to do when making a gluten-free AND dairy-free pie crust. If you would like my recipe for an absolutely delicious gluten-free and dairy-free pumpkin pie, visit this link. This post below is just about the crust.

Here are some things you need to know before you start:

  • One bag makes 2 generous crusts; either a top and bottom, or two crusts. When I made a fruit pie in a deep dish pie pan, there was really too much crust in my opinion. My advice is to save the extra and make some little cutouts. They make a great decoration for the pie or even shortbread-style cookie. Plan accordingly. I personally don’t like a thick crust.
  • Instead of all shortening, try using a combination of shortening, a butter substitute (I like the soy-free Earth Balance sticks) and coconut oil. I found this worked best to make a super-flakey crust. I refer to this as the fat.
  • Make sure your shortening is very cold. If you can, place the fat in the fridge the day before. I usually place the fat in the freezer for a few minutes before I start my pie crust but this might make it too cold. And if you are using a butter substitute stick, cut it into smaller pieces before you chop it up.
  • Always mix the crust with your hands to be able to feel it. Add enough water to the dough so that there are no cracks.
  • Dairy-free pie crust tends to fall apart more. Roll it out between two pieces of plastic wrap or even in a large zippered freezer bag. Whenever I have tried to roll it out with tapioca flour or a gluten-free flour, it causes the crust to fall apart.

Now let’s go through the steps. The whole process from the time you take the bag out of your cupboard to the time the pie goes in the oven should take about an hour and a half (with an hour for the crust to rest in the refrigerator).

gf pie crust ingredients

FIRST MEASURE THE FAT (at least 3 hours before)

Let’s talk about measuring shortening for a minute. It’s a messy thing. The recipe on the back of the bag calls for 20 tablespoons total of shortening. If you convert 20 tablespoons to ounces, it equals 10 ounces. I learned that, because of the water content of butter, a measure say of a 1/2 cup of shortening does not weigh 4 ounces like its butter equivalent. Get the equivalents here on this post about how much shortening weighs. I now own a scale and find it much easier and less messy to weigh the shortening.

For this pie crust recipe I use 240 grams of a combination of the three butter substitutes. I probably use about 90 grams each of the shortening and Earth Balance then made up the rest of the measurement with the coconut oil (closer to 60 grams)

Once the fat is measured, place it in the fridge about 3 hours before you want to start. If you are like me and did not factor in those 3 hours, place the fat in the freezer to get extra cold for about 5-10 minutes. My coconut oil and shortening are always at room temperature.

One more thing: make sure the pieces of the shortening are cut into smaller pieces. For example, as part of the measurement I used a stick of the soy-free Earth Balance. Before this goes into the freezer, I cut the stick up into smaller pieces. This really helps with distributing the fat into the flour. If you don’t do this step, the fat may not properly incorporate.

gf pie crust crumbled

MIX THE FAT WITH THE PIE CRUST MIX

Once the fat has gotten super cold, get everything else out: Bob’s Gluten-Free Pie Crust Mix, a food processor fitted with the metal blade (the most efficient way to cut the fat into the flour), ice cold water (a bowl of cold water with a few ice cubes), a large bowl, measuring spoons, and plastic wrap. I find letting the fat get a tiny bit soft helps. So 10 minutes in the freezer, then less than 5 minutes on the counter. If you don’t have a food processor, you will need to “cut” the fat into the flour mix using two knives or a pastry blender. Proceed to the ICE WATER step.

Place the entire bag of pie crust mix in the food processor first. Place the cold fat into the food processor, making sure there are no big pieces. On the directions, it says to pulse 10 times for about a second for each pulse.

Here’s what I learned. When I took the shortening out of the freezer and it was super cold, it did not get cut properly in 10 pulses. When I put it in the freezer to get it cold but then left it out on the counter for about 5 minutes, it almost was fully cut in the 10 pulses. Bottom line: if you put the fat in the fridge the night before to get cold, you will probably be able to cut it properly in 10 pulses, maybe 15 total. If you use the freezer method, you might need to pulse it more than 10. The harder the fat is, the more pulses it will take. You need to use your judgement. If you see big pieces of the fat, continue to pulse but do not overdo it.

ADD ICE WATER TO MIXTURE IN A BOWL

Next, and this is very important, transfer the mixture into a large to medium bowl. Do not try to mix this in the food processor. You need to be able to feel it. I also tried mixing it with a spatula. That didn’t work too well. Your hands are your best tool. Once the mixture is in the bowl, distribute (meaning don’t dump it all in one place) 6 tablespoons of ice water. Mix that together. You might need more water so don’t discard it yet.

gf pie crust discs

FORM CRUST INTO TWO DISCS

This is also very important: if the mixture does not hold together, add more water until it’s smooth. If there is not enough water, it will fall apart when you are rolling it. At that point, it’s much harder to fix. Make sure there are no cracks in the dough. This is something that when you do more than once it will become easier. Divide the dough into two pieces and shape each into a round disc. Note: if you are making 1 pie in a deeper pan, divide the dough into two; 2/3 and 1/3 discs. You can save the smaller piece for another use.

gf pie crust ready to roll

ROLL THE CRUST

Keep the discs in the fridge for about an hour. You might be able to keep it for longer but the consistency of the dough might be affected.

While the discs are in the fridge, get out the rest of your pie filling ingredients, a rolling pin, more plastic wrap for rolling, and pie pans.

I highly suggest using an egg wash if you bake dairy-free. If you use a dairy substitute instead of butter, the crust tends to be more white. An egg wash is made with 1 egg mixed with 1 teaspoon of milk or water. If you are egg-free, try using a milk substitute, like coconut milk, instead.

BAKE THE PIE

Preheat the oven about 20 minutes before you are ready to bake to make sure the oven is nice and hot.gf pie crust with pie pan

Take the discs out of the fridge and prepare the filling ingredients. Let the discs sit out about 5 minutes before rolling. Now, here’s where you have to follow the rules. Roll one of the discs of the dough between two pieces of plastic (or possibly in a large freezer bag). I have tried to do this with my rolling mat and tapioca flour; it resulted in a crumbly crust. Place the pie pan on top of the plastic to estimate how much more the dough should be rolled. I usually estimate there to be 2-3 inches all around.gf pie crust fitting

Once the crust is rolled out, remove only one of the pieces of plastic. Carefully flip the crust onto the pie pan, remove the plastic wrap, and press into the pan. Remove excess dough and make a decorative crust on top with either your fingers or a fork. If the crust breaks, add small amounts of water to seal/fix. Repeat with second crust in the second pie pan if using.

gf pie crust shell raw

Divide pie filling evenly between two pies. Carefully brush crust with egg wash. Sprinkle some sugar on the crust if it’s a sweet pie. Place in the oven and follow the directions for your pie. I like to place mine on a baking sheet to prevent spills or crumbs from going into the oven.

When the pies are baking, keep an eye on the crust. You may need to line the crust with foil halfway through the baking process if it starts to get too brown.

Phew! That was a lot of details but since I can’t be in the kitchen with you, this is your cooking lesson. Enjoy the tips. I hope you love it!

gf pie crust cooked

Amy FothergillAmy Fothergill is a blogger, consultant, cooking instructor and the author of The Warm Kitchen: Gluten-Free Recipes Anyone Can Make and Everyone Will Love. She lives in the San Francisco area with her husband and two children. Keep up with Amy at The Family Chef.

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orange dijon bulgur salad F

6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

by Claire Gallam in Featured Articles, Recipes

As a food blogger and recipe developer, I’m constantly looking for the big “new” thing. Instead of chicken, I’m buying duck. In place of spaghetti noodles I’m buying soba. I’m constantly looking for a new ingredient that will turn an ordinary dish into something miraculous. And that’s exactly why I bought Bulgur.

It was a few months ago and I was shopping for a rice substitute. That’s when my eyes landed on a bag of Bob’s Red Mill Bulgur. Never having heard of it, I thought “hey, this is kind of unique and exotic. I could use this in place of rice!” I bought it and for months it sat in my cupboard. Finally, on a rainy Tuesday, I ripped open the package and cooked it with some olive oil, fresh herbs and plenty of salt and pepper. After one bite, I was hooked.  The entire bag was gone the following week.

Bob's Red Mill Bulgur

For those who haven’t heard of it (or tried it), bulgur is a wheat grain that has been cracked and partially cooked. It’s very high in fiber, low in fat and calories and is a great addition to vegan and vegetarian entrees. It’s most commonly found in tabbouleh salads, but it’s also popular in pilafs and burgers.

What I love about this grain is how versatile it is. You can sub it in for rice under your favorite stews, you can use it in place of processed noodles in spring pasta salads.  You can even use it in meatballs and meatloaf for a high fiber alternative to the typical unhealthy entrée.

Instead of just telling you all of the amazing ways to use bulgur, why not show you? I’ve rounded up 6 new, exciting and beautiful dishes highlighting this uniquely healthy grain. So what’s stopping you, get your bulgur on!

Cinnamon Banana Breakfast BulgurCinnamon Banana Breakfast Bulgur | 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Move over cream of wheat, this luscious banana bulgur is taking your place! Add a few crunchy walnuts or pecans for a healthier take on banana bread! Grab the recipe here on Tasty Kitchen. Photo by Courtney of Neighborhood Food Blog.

Bulgur Wheat Salad with Orange Mustard Dressing 

Bulgur Wheat Salad with Orange Dijon Dressing| 7 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Forget high carb & high fat pasta and toss in bulgur to your favorite side salads instead, like Gina from Running to the Kitchen did! This high fiber salad is loaded with extra protein from the edamame and has the perfect hint of citrus in the dressing. Grab the recipe on Running to the Kitchen!

Curried Bulgur Sliders

Curried Bulgur Sliders| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Now this is a recipe I could eat everyday! These little sliders use bulgur in place of beef, giving you a much lower fat and healthier slider for your summertime BBQ’s. Plus, the addition of curry gives each bite the perfect added spice. I could easily eat 10 of these, couldn’t you? Grab the recipe on Bev Cooks!

Vegan Bulgur Chili
Creamy Bulgur Chili| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Even though the temperatures outside are hot, that’s not going to stop me from eating chili. This vegetarian rendition is made with wheat bulgur and beans and is topped with fresh summer produce like yellow tomatoes, herbs and red onion.  This would make a great Sunday night dinner (that’ll keep in the freezer for a later date too!) Grab the recipe here on Naturally Ella.

Bulgur and Spinach Pilaf

Bulgur and Spinach Pilaf| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

I don’t know what I love more with this recipe, the hearty and flavorful bulgur pilaf or the creamy caramelized onions on top! If you need a healthy potluck dish for your spring or summer parties, look no further than this pilaf. Plus it’s completely vegan for your non-dairy and meat-free friends. Grab the recipe on Joanne Eats Well With Others.

Bulgur Moroccan Salad

Bulgur Moroccan Salad| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

I’ve been obsessed with Morrocan flavors lately so this salad is right up my alleyway. The bulgur adds a nice pack of fiber while the creamy cilantro orange dressing gives each bite a rich, zesty flavor. This is one salad I’d never get tired of. Grab the recipe on Pinch of Yum.

Claire GallamClaire is a cookbook author, food writer and recipe creator, soon-to-be culinary student and avid world traveler. She is recently married to a social media guru who loves *almost* everything she conjures up. She writes full-time for the Food section of SheKnowsFabulousFoods.com and is a contributing writer for the Travel section of SheKnows. You can also follow her daily musings and find delicious healthy recipes on her food blog, The Realistic Nutritionist. Follow Claire on Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with her newest creations. 

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Pancake Topping Ideas

by Julia Mueller in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Hi everyone! Julia from The Roasted Root here, checking in to talk to you about topping your pancakes in the utmost delicious ways!  We all know it’s tough to beat a Saturday morning stack of pure pancake lovin’, but sometimes we get stuck in the same ol’ butter and maple syrup routine and overlook the variety of flavor, texture, and (believe it or not) nutrition that we can inject into our pancake sessions. Fret not: I’m here to help break the mold and give you healthful ideas to make your pancake endeavors that much more pleasing.

Because I eat a wheat-free diet, I have taken a personal interest in developing gluten-free pancake recipes using an assortment of Bob’s Red Mill’s gluten-free flours and nut meals. From Almond Flour Pancakes, Lemon Poppy Seed Coconut Flour Pancakes, to Brown Rice Flour Banana Pancakes, whipping up fun and inviting hot cake recipes is a big hobby of mine.Pancakes with peaches, chia seeds, and honey

But let’s talk toppings! Yes, I have been known to eat pancakes layered with fried egg and bacon. Ham and cheese? Check! All sorts of fruit, yogurt, nut, and homemade syrup concoctions? Always on board! I’ve even made chocolate syrup using coconut milk, cocoa powder, and pure maple syrup. In essence, I always enjoy coming up with new ways of serving pancakes.

Let’s face it: butter and store-bought syrup is tough to beat as a pancake topping; however, unless you buy pure maple syrup, which can be expensive, you end up using syrup that is full of artificial ingredients and cane sugar. From fresh fruit and nuts to compotes or homemade syrups, many toppings don’t require much time at all, just a little forethought. Let’s gather some ideas for our next stack of pancakes, shall we?!

Pancakes with Peanut butter and Banana

Fruit, nuts, yogurt, seeds, nut butters:

I love chopping fresh fruit and adding it to a pancake breakfast, along with raw nuts, yogurt, seeds, and/or nut butters. Peanut butter and banana will always win me over. I also love fresh mango or pineapple along with chia seeds and/or pumpkin seeds.  Taking the raw and fresh route is fast, easy, adds health benefits to your meal and helps avoid the temptation to douse a stack of pancakes with syrup.

Pancakes with Coconut Milk, Mango, Walnut

Fruit Compote:

Compote is made by heating fruit, a small amount of liquid and sweetener in a saucepan and allowing it to gently boil until it softens and becomes juicy.  For soft fruit (like berries), this process only takes about 15 minutes. For heartier fruit (such as apples and pears), the process takes about 35 to 40 minutes. I like to add a little bit of a natural sweetener, such as honey or pure maple syrup, in order to keep the compote healthful yet sweet. Mimicking apple or berry crisp using fruit compote and granola makes for such a treat, and makes you feel like you’re eating dessert for breakfast!

Pancakes with Raspberry Syrup

Homemade Syrup:

Homemade syrups are easier than you’d think! They can be made using a large variety of fresh fruit. You simply start by cooking your fruit of choice with water and sweetener (just like you would a compote), and then strain the fruit pulp in order to achieve a syrup.  You can add your desired amount of pure maple syrup or honey in order to sweeten the syrup to your liking.

In addition to a fruit-based syrup, did you know you could make thick, creamy toppings using full-fat coconut milk?  Simply heat up a can of coconut milk and allow it to boil for 40 to 50 minutes until it thickens. You can keep it simple by adding a natural sweetener and vanilla extract. For a citrus-y topping, add lemon zest, a small amount of lemon juice, and maple syrup. Also try a chocolate-y topping by mixing the coconut milk with cocoa powder, a pinch of cinnamon, and some pure maple syrup for a decadent yet healthful treat!

Pancake topping ideas from Bob's Red Mill

Topping Ideas:

  1. Plain Greek yogurt (or crème fraiche) and fresh berries
  2. Almond, peanut, or cashew butter and sliced banana
  3. Fresh chopped peaches, honey and chia seeds or pumpkin seeds
  4. Full-fat coconut milk, chopped mango, chopped walnuts
  5. Bob’s Red Mill’s Blueberry Chia Jam and chopped nuts
  6. Homemade chocolate syrup using canned coconut milk
  7. Fried egg and bacon
  8. Country-style ham and cheddar cheese
  9. Apple Crisp Topping (see recipe below!)
  10. Blueberry, blackberry, pear, or apple compote (see recipe for blueberry compote below)

What are your favorite pancake toppings?

Pancakes with apple crisp topping

Apple Crisp Topping

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients except for the granola to a medium-sized pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and allow the mixture to boil gently for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover, stir in ¼ to ½ cup of granola and continue to cook until most of the moisture has burned off.
  2. Add desired amount of topping to fresh-off-the-griddle pancakes.

Blueberry Compote/Syrup:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 3 to 4 Tbsp Water
  • 2 Tbsp Pure Maple Syrup
  • Pinch of Salt

Instructions:

  1. In a small pot, heat all of the ingredients until mixture comes to a full boil.
  2. Reduce heat, cover, and allow mixture to gently boil until blueberries are juicing out and have softened, about 15 minutes.
  3. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture has thickened and berries are coated with a syrupy consistency, about 5 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately on pancakes or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week and reheat when ready to use.

JuliaMuellerJulia Mueller’s two greatest passions are food and the great outdoors. Creator of the food blog, The Roasted Root, Julia enjoys whipping up and photographing nutrient-dense recipes that are healthful yet comforting, and are approachable to make any night of the week. Most of her recipes are vegetable and meat-based, gluten-free and refined-sugar free. Julia is also the author of the cookbooks, Delicious Probiotic Drinks, and Let Them Eat Kale! An avid mountain biker and snowboarder, Julia enjoys balancing work with playing outside in the mountains. Keep up with her onFacebook and Twitter.

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Coconut Hazelnut Shrimp by Cara Lyons for Bobs Red Mill F

Coconut-Hazelnut Shrimp with Grilled Peach Salsa {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Hearty pie crusts, chewy cookies, tender cupcakes, anything with chocolate. These are probably the things most home cooks think about upon hearing that Bob’s Red Mill now sells Hazelnut Meal. Is there something wrong with me that my first thoughts were asparagus and fish? That’s where I started and that’s mostly how we’ve been enjoying this awesomely versatile ingredient!

I’ll even confess, this stuff made it so easy to throw together a simple yet upscale meal, I had trouble getting to the point of actually writing a jazzed up recipe. But summer’s coming, and I’ve been excited by the fresh, sweet peaches finally popping up in the supermarket. Peaches and hazelnuts actually make a perfect pair! Throw some shrimp into the mix and you’ve got a savory, scrumptious summer recipe.

Coconut shrimp used to be one of those special things I thought reserved for restaurants. That’s until I realized they’re actually easy-peasy to make at home. And even more flavorful when you mix up the traditional coconut-breadcrumb topping with nuts. Slightly sweet, buttery hazelnuts are the perfect compliment to coconut, both of which taste even better when toasted.

So, while I know you’ll want to get your hands on some hazelnut meal to make a decadent dessert, don’t forget to save some for this sweet summer dinner.

Coconut Hazelnut Shrimp by Cara Lyons for Bobs Red Mill

Coconut-Hazelnut Shrimp with Grilled Peach Salsa

Recipe and Photos by Cara Lyons

Serves 3-4

Salsa Ingredients

  • 3 Peaches, halved and pitted
  • Olive Oil Cooking Spray
  • ¼ teaspoon Cinnamon
  • ½ cup chopped Red Onion
  • ½ cup chopped Red Bell Pepper
  • 1 Jalapeno Pepper, seeded and minced
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed Lime Juice
  • 1 teaspoon ground Cumin
  • ½ teaspoon Salt
  • ¼ cup chopped Cilantro

Shrimp Ingredients

Directions

Preheat grill to medium heat. Mist both sides of peach halves with cooking spray and sprinkle the flesh sides with cinnamon. Place cut side down on the grill for 5-6 more; flip and cook for another 5-6 minutes until softened and charred. Remove from grill and set aside to cool.

In a medium bowl, combine remaining salsa ingredients. When peaches are cool enough to handle, slip the skins off and chop. Stir into the salsa. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to blend flavors.

Meanwhile, prepare the shrimp. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Place a wire rack over a baking sheet and mix with cooking spray.

Place arrowroot starch in a baking dish or pie dish. Add egg to a small bowl and beat with a fork. Combine hazelnut meal, coconut and ginger in another baking dish or pie dish. Working with a few shrimp at a time, dredge each one through the arrowroot starch and shake off excess, then dip in egg and then hazelnut mixture, turning to coat all sides. Place on the wire rack and repeat with remaining shrimp. Mist tops of shrimp with cooking spray.

Bake for 10 minutes, then turn on broiler and cook for another 2-3 minutes, until tops are lightly browned. Serve hot with peach salsa.

Cara Lyons | Cara's CravingsCara Lyons is a freelance recipe developer and food blogger from Worcester, Massachusetts. She enjoys working with nutrient-dense, whole foods to create food for all to enjoy; many of her recipes are gluten-free and dairy-free by choice. Look for her recipes at carascravings.com, and in Clean Eating Magazine and Simply Gluten Free Magazine. 

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1green-onion-pancakes F

Meatless Mondays: Savory Green Onion Pancakes

by Guest in Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

I adore green onion pancakes but they usually require you to create dough, which needs to be kneaded, rested, and then rolled out. At JoyFoodly, I’m always looking for ways to simplify recipes for families. Really, this is the only way anyone who is busy can joyfully recreate a favorite recipe time and again. For this savory and delicious green onion pancake, I’ve found a way I think you’ll love that’s quick and seriously yummy.

It all starts with the star of the pancake, the green onion batter. For this recipe, my shortcut is my always on-hand Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pancake Mix. You can whip this batter up in no time. I especially love to get kids involved with measuring ingredients and stirring the batter.

The other thing I love about this pancake batter is that it can take quite a bit of green onions, so if you’re also looking for a way to really use up a lot of them (or just love green onions!), feel free to overstuff and top these beauties for extra crunch. If you’re not sure how to cut or prep green onions, here’s a quick video we’ve put together for our Joyful 12 Kitchen Learning Lab that will help make your prep just a little more joyful:

Here’s to your family having some fun in the kitchen on this Meatless Monday. Don’t forget to add a little drizzle of sauce to kick up the fun one extra notch!

PS: We thought the sour cream on top could be optional but we highly recommend it not be!

Tips to help your kids love Savory Green Onion Pancakes

We include tips like this in all of the recipes in our online kitchen learning lab, the Joyful 12! Learn more here.

  • Get them involved: Making batter is a great lesson for kids in the kitchen. Show them how to accurately measure ingredients and why this is important. Have them help you incorporate the dry and the wet ingredients and learn when the batter is the right consistency (not too thick but not too runny)
  • Be a food explorer: People eat pancakes all over the world! In France, they eat thinner pancakes called crepes. Here, we are making a savory vs. sweet pancake. Ask your child what they think about savory pancakes.
  • Taste your creation: It’s fun to make one pancake from the batter and have your child help you taste test it. Do you want to add more green onions to it, or maybe more Chinese five spice? Then, when you’ve finished cooking them all, you’ll already know your child likes them because you involved them in making them and tasting them!

1green-onion-pancakes

Savory Green Onion Pancakes

Serving size: 4 | Prep time: 15 minutes | Cooking time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 bunch Green Onions
  • 1-1/2 cups Pancake Mix (we use Bob’s Red Mill® Gluten Free)
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 cup Coconut Milk
  • 2 Tbsp Sesame Oil
  • 1/2 tsp Chinese Five Spice
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 3 Tbsp Coconut Oil or Vegetable Oil
  • Sour Cream, optional topping

Sauce to Drizzle

  • 2 Tbsp Sesame Oil
  • 1-1/2 tsp Rice Wine Vinegar
  • 1 tsp Tamari (Gluten Free Soy Sauce)
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • 1 pinch Hot Pepper Flakes

Directions
Note on Substitutions: you can use soy or almond milk in place of coconut milk, and vegetable oil in place of coconut oil.

2-ingredients

Get Organized:

1. Take 5 minutes to get out all your ingredients, measuring and cooking equipment needed, and place them on a cookie sheet within easy reach.

2. Make the sauce that can be drizzled on top of pancakes by combining all ingredients in a bowl and stirring together.

3. Cut the green onions into small discs. Set aside a few green tops to be used to sprinkle over pancakes when you serve them.

4. Preheat oven to 325F, to keep cooked pancakes warm while you finish cooking all the batter.

3mixing-batter

To Cook:

1. In a bowl beat the egg together with the coconut milk and sesame oil.

2. In a separate bowl, combine the Chinese five spice and salt with the pancake four.

3. Add the pancake flour and spices to the egg mixture gradually, stirring to combine.

4. Stir in the cut green onions into the batter.

5. In a nonstick pan, heat enough coconut oil in the pan to just cover the bottom of the pan.

6. Use a spoon to place 1-2 pancakes into the pan. Cook over medium-high heat. Look for bubbles on the outside of the pancakes. Flip and cook another minute.

7. Hold finished pancakes in a warm oven on a cookie sheet.

8. Serve with a dollop of sour cream (optional but yummy), extra green onions, and the sauce on the side, which can be drizzled over.

hollie-headshot-postsChef Hollie Greene is passionate about bringing the joy of good food to your family. She created JoyFoodly™, a San Francisco mission based company, to help families joyfully get more fruits and vegetables into their families’ diets. The Joyful 12™, Chef Hollie’s Online Kitchen Learning Lab, helps parents explore and learn how to joyfully get twelve fruits and veggies into their families’ diets each season.

Chef Hollie is a graduate of the French Culinary Institute in NY and has taught over 2,000 children in New York and California through her work with non-profit programs partnering with Rachael Ray’s Yum-O!, Mayor Bloomberg, and as a Professional Expert for the State of California’s Healthy CA Kids Initiative. Follow Hollie on Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with her newest joyful kitchen creations.

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Whole Wheat Flax Beer Bread from Fitzala | Bob's Red Mill

Whole Wheat Beer Bread with Flax {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Recipes

Hello Bob’s Red Mill blog readers! I’m Jenni, the personal trainer behind Fitzala. Today I’ll be sharing a great recipe for a hearty snack. Beer bread doesn’t rank high on most people’s list for healthy snacks, but this one is delicious and good for you.

Most beer bread recipes are high in sugar and fat, which isn’t the best for your health. This recipe uses flaxseed meal to keep the bread moist and replace the not so healthy fats. Flaxseed is high in fiber and omega-3 fatty acids. Another great aspect of healthy fats is that they provide a high level of satiety, making you feel more satisfied after eating.

Normal whole wheat flour can give baked goods a grainy, dense or overwhelming “wheaty” taste. You can fix this and still get the whole grain nutrients by substituting whole wheat pastry flour. It lends the lighter texture that most white flour baked goods have without sacrificing the fiber, vitamins and minerals that whole wheat flour lends.

With these two power ingredients, this bread is nutritious, satiating and sticks with you while you go about your busy day. The hoppy beer taste is just a bonus!

If you’re wary about using beer, take comfort in knowing that 75% of the alcohol bakes out. There’s not enough left in it to give you buzz of any kind, though I wouldn’t recommend using it if you are allergic to alcohol. You can substitute soda or seltzer water for beer, but I can’t guarantee the results and the taste will definitely differ.

Whole Wheat Flax Beer Bread from Fitzala | Bob's Red Mill

Whole Wheat Beer Bread with Flax

Yield: 15 slices

Ingredients:

  • 2 ¼ cups Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • ½ cup Flaxseed Meal
  • 1 tablespoon Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Baking Soda
  • ¾ teaspoon Salt
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 tablespoon Maple Syrup (sugar-free is fine too)
  • 1- 12 oz bottle/can of Beer

Instructions:

Preheat your oven to 350°F and prepare a bread pan with grease or parchment.

Place the flour, flax, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in one bowl and whisk to combine.

Beat together the egg and maple syrup in another bowl then mix in the beer.

Pour the wet ingredients in to the dry and mix until just combined.

Place the bread mixture in your greased pan and bake for 40 minutes or until done.

Jenni Kenyon from FitzalaJenni is an NASM certified personal trainer and loves helping women find balance in health and exercise. She and her husband live in Central Washington and spend as much time as possible outdoors. Find her on her blog, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, or G+.

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Red Bean and Kamut Soup F

Meatless Monday Explained + Red Bean and Kamut® Soup

by Guest in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

How many times have you heard something like this: “The foundation of a healthy diet is fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains.”

For many of us—especially seasoned home cooks—this is old news, and it may not even be something we think about all that often. We love plants, of course we eat them every day!

But the truth is, actually consuming the full recommended number of servings of these healthy foods on a daily basis is difficult, even for a registered dietitian like myself. Current dietary guidelines recommend five servings of produce and six ounces of grains daily for most people. Eating meat at every meal – or even every day – can make this a challenge.

In 2003, renowned advertising mogul Sid Lerner revived Meatless Monday (once popular as a war conservation effort) as a way to encourage the public to reduce their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol from animal products and eat more healthy plant foods. Since then, individuals, organizations and brands like Bob’s Red Mill have adopted the initiative to help spread the message about the benefits of periodic meatless eating.

Red Bean and Kamut Soup | Bob's Red Mill

In my work promoting Meatless Monday, I find that each eater is inspired to join the campaign for a slightly different reason. Some of the most popular include:

For health: Research shows that those who follow diets low in animal products and high in plant foods have lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of developing cancer and heart disease, lower blood pressure and lower total mortality. Meatless foods, especially whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables are packed full of fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

To discover a new favorite: It’s easy to fall into a meal rut and cook up the same old chicken breast or ground beef most nights. Challenging yourself to go meat-free one day a week can provide inspiration to finally try that curious vegetable or ancient grain you keep hearing about. You may discover a new healthy favorite that will become a regular feature in your diet on other days of the week.

For solidarity: Social support is a huge element of any healthy habit. Even if you regularly eat meatless meals, making a specific effort to do it on Mondays and to share your habit with those in your household or via social media can inspire others to make Meatless Monday and plant-based eating a regular habit, too. It’s also exciting to know you’re participating in a global movement – over 30 countries now have active Meatless Monday campaigns.

For the environment: Eating less meat is an environmentally friendly choice, since production of animal foods is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

meatlessmonday_logo

As Meatless Monday’s dietitian, I often hear concerns about whether you can still get enough protein without eating meat. The answer is a resounding yes! Very few people in the United States get too little protein, even among full-time vegetarians. And most plant foods contain more protein than we think, whole grains especially. Quinoa has developed a reputation for being a protein superstar over the past few years, but interestingly, many other whole grains pack in even more protein per serving than the popular South American seed. Amaranth, millet, farro and Kamut® wheat come in at about seven or eight grams of protein per one-fourth cup serving as compared to quinoa’s five.

In the spirit of discovering new favorites on Meatless Monday, I decided to give Kamut® Khorasan Wheat a shot. Kamut® wheat, while technically an ancient wheat, sure looks a lot like brown rice, so I was inspired to try it out in a twist on traditional red beans and rice.

Beans and grains have historically been paired together not only because of their complementary flavors, but because when combined, the proteins from the two plants provide all of the essential amino acids we need to carry out our daily functions. There’s actually no need to make sure you get each of the essential amino acids in the same meatless meal, but that doesn’t mean the combination isn’t still delicious and worthy of a spot in your next Meatless Monday dinner.

Red Bean and Kamut Soup | Bob's Red Mill

Red Bean and Kamut® Soup

Serves 4

  • 1 cup Kamut® Khorasan Wheat
  • 3 Tbsp Olive Oil or Butter
  • 1 medium Onion, diced
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 6 cups Vegetable Stock
  • 1 ½ cups Tomato Puree
  • 2 (15 oz.) cans Red Beans
  • 2 Tbsp Chili Powder
  • 2 tsp dried Thyme
  • 1/2 tsp Cayenne Pepper
  • 3 Bay Leaves
  • Salt to taste (consider salt content of vegetable stock)

Soak Kamut in water overnight. Before cooking, drain and discard soaking water.

In a large stockpot or dutch oven, heat butter or olive oil over medium heat. Add onions, saute until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add garlic and saute one minute more.

Add soaked Kamut and remaining ingredients. Mix well, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer 40 minutes to one hour, until Kamut has cooked and flavors are combined.

Remove bay leaves and serve.

Diana Rice, RD | Meatless MondaysDiana K. Rice, RD is the registered dietitian and recipe editor on staff with The Monday Campaigns, a nonprofit public health marketing initiative dedicated to using the first day of the week to prompt healthy behavior changes. Diana focuses her efforts on the organization’s nutrition-oriented initiatives Meatless Monday, The Kids Cook Monday and Healthy Monday. She has studied at NYU, the University of Northern Colorado and Cedar Crest College and is an advocate for sustainable agriculture and children’s nutrition education. Contact The Monday Campaigns to start a campaign in your area and keep up with Diana on Twitter.

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Kale and Cheesy Grits F

Meatless Mondays: Garlicky Kale with Fire-Roasted Tomatoes and Cheesy Brown Rice “Grits”

by Stephanie Wise in Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Breakfast used to be my least favorite meal of the day: So much so, I’d often skip it. Of course, that would lead to headaches, dizziness and extreme hunger by mid-morning – leaving me crankier than if I’d just eaten a granola bar or bowl of cereal.

Kale and Cheesy Grits | Bob's Red Mill

Nowadays, I’ve not only learned to eat a healthy and hearty breakfast daily, but actually enjoy it. It helps to have a variety of go-to recipes on hand that are easy enough for me to make first thing in the morning (you know, before I’ve had my coffee). This recipe for garlicky kale and cheesy brown rice farina grits is perfect for those mornings when I’m craving something savory, but healthy and filling. The kale is sautéed until wilted with fire-roasted tomatoes and fresh garlic, and the creamy brown rice farina cereal – mixed with mozzarella cheese and butter – serves as a nutritious “grits”-like base, and is entirely gluten-free. It’s perfect on its own for a hearty breakfast or as a brunch side with eggs and fresh fruit.

Next time you’re considering skipping breakfast or just need a boost in your morning routine, make these savory grits. Your taste buds and your tummy will thank you.

Kale and Cheesy Grits | Bob's Red Mill

Garlicky Kale with Fire-Roasted Tomatoes and Cheesy Brown Rice Farina “Grits”

Yields: 2 large or 4 small servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 tsp Olive Oil
  • 1 clove Garlic, minced
  • 1 bunch Kale, stems removed and coarsely chopped
  • 1 can (14.5 oz) diced Fire-Roasted Tomatoes
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste
  • 2 cups Water
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • ¾ cup Bob’s Red Mill® Creamy Brown Rice Farina
  • ½ cup shredded Mozzarella Cheese
  • 1 Tbsp Butter
  • Parmesan Cheese, for topping

Directions:

Heat olive oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and saute 1 minute until fragrant. Add chopped kale and cook, stirring often, until half-wilted. Add diced tomatoes (with liquid) and stir.

Cook 5 minutes until kale is completely wilted and mixture is warmed through. Remove from heat; season with salt and pepper to taste.

Meanwhile, bring water and salt in a medium saucepan to a boil. Stir in brown rice farina; reduce heat to low. Cook 5 minutes, stirring often, until cereal is cooked and mixture is thickened. Remove from heat; stir in shredded mozzarella cheese and butter.

Divide cereal mixture among serving bowls. Top with kale-tomato mixture. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese just before serving.

Stephanie Wise | Girl Versus DoughStephanie is the baker/blogger/babbler behind the blog, Girl Versus Dough, where she writes about her adventures in bread baking and other tasty, unique recipes. Her approach is friendly yet inspiring, down-to-earth yet adventurous. She lives in the Twin Cities with her husband, Elliott, her furry child-cat, Percy and a growing belly bump that will turn into a baby girl this May. Keep up with her on Facebook and Twitter

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Brownies1

Getting Enough Dietary Fiber on Your Low Carb Diet + Mocha Chocolate Chunk Chia Seed Brownies

by Carolyn Ketchum in Gluten Free, Health, Recipes

There are a great many misconceptions about low carb diets, and one of them is that they must be very low in dietary fiber. We all know fiber is good for us. It fills us up, keeps us regular, slows the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, and may contribute to heart and colon health. It’s pretty important stuff. Since low carb diets eschew many commonly accepted sources of fiber, such as whole grains and legumes, many people believe low carb diets to also be low fiber diets. And if they are low in fiber, it logically follows that they can’t possibly be good for us, right? Wrong. Don’t mind me if I just gently blow a few holes in that idea.

Mocha Chocolate Chunk Chia Brownies Low Carb, Gluten Free | Bob's Red Mill

First, let’s consider the best source of dietary fiber. It is not, as many people believe, whole grains and legumes but vegetables and fruits that give us the bulk of our daily fiber intake. Or at least it should be. It goes without saying that any healthy diet should include a variety of vegetables and fruit every day. We’re all supposed to be getting our 7 to 9 servings or more per day and that holds just as true on a low carb diet as it does on any other. And thankfully, the vast majority of vegetables, and some fruits as well, are both low in carbohydrates and high in dietary fiber. No matter what diet you follow, if you’re skimping on these foods, you’re cheating yourself of the best sources of fiber and other nutrients.

You might also be surprised to find that many of the low carb alternatives to whole grains have just as much as much or more fiber than their conventional counterparts. Nut meals typically contain 3 or 4 g per serving, which is as much fiber as a serving of whole wheat flour. Coconut flour varies between 5 and 10 g of fiber per serving, depending on the brand, and almost all of the carbohydrates in flax and chia seeds are from dietary fiber. Many low carb recipes also substitute veggies like cauliflower and zucchini for rice and pasta, increasing the fiber and nutrients of many dishes even further.

Mocha Chocolate Chunk Chia Brownies Low Carb, Gluten Free| Bob's Red Mill

A great part of the confusion surrounding low carb diets comes from the misperception that they are high protein diets. They aren’t, or at least they shouldn’t be. Done correctly, a low carb diet should be low in carbs (obviously!) and high in fat, with moderate amounts of protein. I know the high fat part scares many people, but science is increasingly coming out in favor of the idea that fats, even saturated fats, are not the enemy. Admittedly, it’s still a bit of a hard sell, and with low carb diets being so misunderstood, they are easy to vilify. I get that; it was a hard sell for me too at first.

I recently read an article about two men, identical twins, who decided to put low carb versus low fat to the test. For a period of one month, one twin ate low carb and the other ate low fat. In the end, the twin on the low carb diet lost more weight, but says he felt sluggish, his breath stank and he was constipated. Well no wonder, since his version of low carb consisted solely of meat, fish, eggs and cheese. He didn’t do a low carb diet, he did a NO carb diet, eating zero fruits, vegetables, nuts or seeds for a whole month. There was nary a gram of dietary fiber to be seen and I don’t know anyone who would advocate this kind of extreme dieting. Naturally, the article gained traction on many news outlets across the globe. Is it any wonder that with this kind of press, low carb diets are so misunderstood?

Mocha Chocolate Chunk Chia Brownies Low Carb, Gluten Free | Bob's Red Mill

One more thing that should convince you how important fiber-rich foods are if you’re going low carb is that they count against your overall carb count. Fiber is indigestible and is not absorbed into the bloodstream. It has no effect on blood glucose levels and many countries don’t even consider it a carbohydrate in their nutritional labeling. The US lists it as a carbohydrate, however, and most low carb diets suggest calculating “net carbs” by subtracting the grams of fiber from the total grams of carbohydrate. Bingo. Right there, you just ate less carbs than you thought you did.

I advocate eating a variety of fiber-rich foods on a low carb diet, as they will help you feel full, healthy and energized. With so many great sources of fiber available, there is simply no need to limit yourself to meat, fish, eggs and cheese. And why would you want to? You can enjoy an amazing variety of foods without blowing your low carb goals. And you’ll be much happier and more likely to stick with it.

Mocha Chocolate Chunk Chia Brownies Low Carb, Gluten Free | Bob's Red Mill

Mocha Chocolate Chunk Chia Seed Brownies

  • ¾ cup Chia Seed Meal (about ½ cup whole seeds – I grind them in my coffee grinder)
  • ¾ cup Swerve Sweetener or other Erythritol
  • ½ tsp Baking Soda
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • ½ cup Butter
  • 3 oz Unsweetened Chocolate
  • 4 large Eggs
  • ¼ cup strongly brewed Coffee
  • 2 oz Dark Chocolate Chunks (70 to 90% cacao)

Preheat oven to 350°F and grease a 9 x 9 square baking pan. Line with parchment paper, with some overhanging the sides for easy release. Grease parchment.

In a medium bowl, whisk together chia seed meal, sweetener, baking soda and salt.

In a large saucepan over low heat, melt butter and chocolate together, whisking until smooth.

Whisk in eggs (mixture may seize), then whisk in coffee. Stir in chia seed mixture until well combined. Stir in chocolate chunks.

Spread batter in prepared pan and bake 15 to 16 minutes for a fudgier consistency or 18 to 20 for a cakier consistency.

Remove and let cool completely in pan.

Remove brownies from pan by grasping the overhanging parchment and lifting carefully. Cut into 16 squares.

Carolyn Ketchum | All Day I Dream About FoodCarolyn Ketchum is the writer, photographer and almond flour wizard behind All Day I Dream About Food, a low carb and gluten-free food blog. Her mission is to prove to the world that special diets need not be boring or restrictive and that healthy dishes can be just as good, or better, than their sugar and gluten-filled counterparts. It’s astonishing what you can do with a bag of almond flour, a stick of butter, and a willingness to experiment. Follow her on FacebookTwitterGoogle Plus and Pinterest for inspiring ideas for the low carb, gluten free lifestyle.

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Simple Meals for the Simple (Or Complicated) Life {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles

Bob’s Red Mill is proud to sponsor athletic endeavors across the country, including the RV Project. Just two mountain climbing addicts, searching out the best climbing in the United States (and Canada) fueled by whole grains. We are happy to welcome Vikki to the blog to tell you more about eating well while living in tight quarters on the go. Learn more about the RV Project and keep up to date with their adventures at http://rvproj.com/.

***

Spenser and I formed The RV Project over two years ago- determined to travel across the United States in search of the best climbing and most interesting people this great nation has to offer.

In order to be as mobile as possible, we decided to move our lives into a 10-foot trailer in February of 2012. We have a two-burner propane stove. We lack refrigeration and running water, which makes us prioritize food that keeps and is easy to prepare. The final parameter for our meals is that I have Celiac Disease. Yep, we also need to eat gluten-free.

Hopefully, you do not have as many restrictions as we do on what you are able to cook. Maybe you share one or two with us, or maybe none. Whether you have a full kitchen or a camp stove, these recipes are delicious, easy to prepare, and, as far as science can tell, really good for you.

To celebrate almost two years on the road, we’ve put together some of our favorite dishes that have proven to be tasty meals, while packing a nutritious punch. Naturally, they’re simple to cook and even easier to clean up after. We’ve included some of our favorite time-saving tips to get the nutrition your body needs when/where you can.

Bob’s products fit seamlessly into our lifestyle, giving us a wide variety of hearty, healthy products to choose from that do not need to be refrigerated and are certified gluten-free. The support allows us to have more freedom in our road trip and for that we are incredibly grateful.

Here’s a standard meal plan for a day in our active lives:

BREAKFAST:

– Oatmeal with dried cranberries & flax seeds.

If I have time in the morning, I prefer to make Bob’s Red Mill GF Steel Cut Oats. The GF Quick Cooking Oats are great if we’re in a rush.

Oatmeal with Cranberries and soaked seeds | Bob's Red Mill

* This will make 2-4 servings, so it can last you a couple of days.

Don’t forget to use your imagination! You can add whatever your heart desires to your very versatile morning oatmeal- hemp seeds, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, nuts, any other dried fruit. Spices like cinnamon or nutmeg can add a nice kick.

Soaking Seeds | Bob's Red Mill

To learn more about the benefits of soaking seeds, check out this article.

LUNCH:

– Usually leftovers, so let’s go straight to dinner.

DINNER:

We stick to 1 pot/1 pan dishes on a regular basis (sometimes it’s 1 pot + 1 pan, when we’re feeling adventurous). :)

For us, dinner is a time to branch out and try new things. We already love quinoa and incorporate it into meals regularly, but had never had the chance to try the other two Grains of Discovery: sorghum and millet. I tried them both out recently and they were delicious!

Millet has a quick cooking time (20 minutes), so is ideal for use in place of rice- we made the Millet Stir-Fry.

Sorghum is more chewy and takes about 50-60 minutes to fully cook. The texture reminded me a lot of how I remember couscous to be. It’s a grain that is is very enjoyable cold, another big plus for us. The Curried Carrots Sorghum Salad was to die for! A small portion kept us full for hours.

They are both a great way to change things up from rice, noodles, or pasta, while increasing your fiber intake. Millet has 9g of fiber per ¼ cup, while sorghum provides 8 grams.

Chili | Bob's Red Mill

Bob’s Red Mill Restaurant Vegetarian Chili recipe is perfect. The Anasazi beans are delicious & Bob’s beans do not need to be soaked overnight (good for those of us who do not  plan ahead).

– The Cranberry Wild Rice is honestly filling enough on it’s own, but also makes a great side dish to any meat.

– The Black Bean, Corn & Quinoa Salad is a fresh take on chili. Just add everything to a pot and enjoy! You can swap out any type of black beans that you may have for the specified Black Turtle Beans.

The trick is to add variety without upping the difficulty level.

Our final tip: Always think about adding to your meal.

Having a salad?

+ add chia/flax/hemp/pumpkin/sunflower seeds

+ Flax seeds to rice (or any grain!) to add nutrition & a nice crunch

+ Chia/flax/hemp seeds whenever you eat cereal or make a smoothie

Hope this is helpful! I would love to answer any questions about the recipes, eating gluten-free, or our trip.

For more on our travels, please visit our blog or Facebook page:

www.rvproj.com
https://www.facebook.com/rvproject

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