Curried Carrots and Sorghum Salad

Meatless Mondays: Curried Carrots & Sorghum Salad

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Curry, carrots, raisins and coconut milk make this salad flavorful and satisfying, but sorghum grain is really the star of this delicious dish. Unlike some gluten free grains, the hearty, chewy texture of whole grain sorghum is very similar to wheat berries, making it an ideal addition to pilafs and cold salads such as this one.  Sorghum is an excellent source of dietary fiber and a wonderful way to include the health benefits of whole grains in a gluten free diet. Sorghum originated in Africa thousands of years ago, and then spread through the Middle East and Asia via ancient trade routes, traveling to the Arabian Peninsula, India and China along the Silk Road. Today sorghum remains a staple food in India and Africa, yet it is still relatively unknown in many parts of the world.

Pair this salad with warm Naan and grilled tofu for a wonderful, easy meal. This salad makes great leftovers the next day, as well. Cheers!
Curried Carrots and Sorghum Salad

Curried Carrots & Sorghum

  •     1 cup Sorghum Grain
  •     3 cups Water
  •     1 tsp Sea Salt divided
  •     1 cup canned Coconut Milk
  •     3 Tbsp Rice Wine Vinegar
  •     1 Tbsp Curry Powder
  •     1/2 tsp Chili Powder
  •     2 tsp Sugar
  •     2 cups slivered Carrots
  •     1/2 cup Raisins
  •     1/4 cup chopped Green Onion

Directions

Step 1

Rinse, drain and pick through sorghum. Combine 3 cups water, 1 cup Sorghum and 1/2-tsp salt in a pot with a tight-fitting lid. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat and let simmer until tender, about 50 – 60 minutes. Drain any excess water.

Step 2

Meanwhile, combine the coconut milk, rice vinegar, curry powder, chili powder, 1/2-tsp salt and sugar.

Step 3

When sorghum is cooked and drained, add carrots, raisins and onions. Toss with dressing. Served chilled or at room temperature.

Makes 4 – 6 servings.

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LentilSoup1

Meatless Mondays: Fall in Love with Legumes

by Guest in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

As a registered dietitian and nutrition journalist, I’ve spent close to 25 years pouring over food and nutrition research.  And it’s led me to one conclusion as to how we can all live healthier, more vibrant lives. The answer: Eat more whole plants. In fact, there are now hundreds of studies backing up the notion that the healthiest diet on the planet is a plant-based one.

Contrary to popular belief, a plant-based diet really is more about what you can eat, rather than what you can’t eat. When most people hear the words “plant-based diet,” raw fruits and vegetables are usually the first thoughts that come to mind.  But a plant-based diet consists of a variety of whole plant foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices, and legumes.

Legumes are the perfect example of a plant-powered “protein package.” This means that legumes are packed with beneficial nutrients like fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals, and essentially void of the “bad stuff”, like saturated fat and sodium. In fact, legumes are as near to a perfect food as you can find. A half-cup portion, on average, contains at least 20% of our daily needs for fiber, folate, and manganese, 10% of our daily needs for protein, potassium, iron, magnesium, and copper; and 6-8% of our daily needs for selenium and zinc.  Research now indicates that eating legumes regularly can offer a variety of health benefits, including lower blood cholesterol levels, lower body weight, and lower rates of heart disease, hypertension, some types of cancer, and diabetes.

Red Lentil Veg Soup Aside from their nutritional perks, legumes are even friends to Mother Earth. Farmers discovered long ago that rotating their crops with legumes would replenish their soil. This is because legumes possess a unique ability to “fix nitrogen,” or transfer nitrogen from the air into the soil, reducing the need for synthetic fertilizers.

As if these benefits alone aren’t enough motivation to increase your intake of legumes, it helps to know that legumes are easy to cook, shelf stable, and economical. And a whole world of legumes awaits your discovery: lima beans, garbanzo beans, split peas, lentils, pinto beans, and kidney beans, just to name a few. They can easily be incorporated into soups, salads, wraps, or served as simple side dishes. You can also take a spin on legumes by trying them in alternative forms such as flours. These high-protein, nutritious flours are perfect alternatives for those with wheat and gluten allergies. Not only that, they can also pump up the nutrition in many of your recipes for baked goods. Simply replace a small amount of wheat flour in your recipes with legume flour and you’ve boosted your intake of plant-powered benefits.

Whether you’re a plant-powered vegan, vegetarian, or omnivore, I recommend you eat at least one ½ cup serving of legumes every day in order to promote your optimal health.

Red Lentil Stew with Root Vegetables

By Sharon Palmer, RD, The Plant-Powered Dietitian

This thick, colorful stew, which calls upon root vegetables, is easy on your wallet and delicious on your taste buds. Try serving it as a light lunch with a salad and rustic, whole grain bread; or for dinner with whole grains such as barley, farro or quinoa on the side.

Makes 6 servings

Ingredients:

1 tsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 medium Parsnips, sliced
2 medium Carrots, sliced
3 stalks Celery, sliced
1 medium Onion, sliced
1 medium Potato, peeled, diced
2 cloves Garlic, minced
½ tsp Low-Sodium Herbal Blend (i.e. Mrs. Dash)
½ tsp Smoked Paprika
1 tsp Thyme
2 cups Low-Sodium Vegetable Broth
4 cups Water
1 ½ cups red lentils, dried

Instructions:

  1. Heat olive oil in a large pot. Add vegetables, garlic, and seasonings, sautéing for about 10 minutes.
  2. Add broth, water and lentils. Cover pot and cook for about 20 minutes, until vegetables and lentils are tender.

Nutritional Information per Serving:

Calories: 278
Carbohydrates: 50g
Protein: 14g
Fat: 4g
Sodium: 60mg
Fiber: 10g

Sharon Palmer: Red Lentil Veg Soup Sharon Palmer is a registered dietitian, writer and author of The Plant-Powered Diet. Over 750 of her articles have been published in national publications, including Prevention, Better Homes and Gardens and Today’s Dietitian. She is also the editor of the award-winning publication Environmental Nutrition and writes for her blog, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Sharon makes her home with her husband and two sons in the chaparral hills overlooking Los Angeles.

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Kamut® Kushari

Meatless Mondays: Kamut® Kushari

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Kushari is an Egyptian dish that often includes rice, lentils and macaroni topped with tomato sauce and sauteed onions. It’s sort of a “kitchen sink” kind of dish and can include almost anything you have on hand. This is our take on this classic African dish using plump Kamut® Khorasan Wheat Berries instead of white rice. A meal unto itself, kushari needs no accompaniment. If Kamut® berries are hard to come by, regular wheat berries or brown rice can be substituted in a pinch.

Kamut® Kushari

Kamut® Kushari

  •     1 cup Organic Kamut® Berries
  •     1 cup Lentils
  •     1 cup Whole Grain Elbow Macaroni
  •     Water as needed
  •     4 medium Onions, halved & thinly sliced
  •     1/4 cup Olive Oil
  •     4 Garlic cloves, chopped
  •     1 tsp ground Cumin
  •     1/2 tsp Red Pepper Flakes
  •     29 oz canned Tomato Puree
  •     Salt & Pepper to taste

Directions

Step 1

Soak Kamut® berries in water overnight. Drain and rise berries.

Step 2

Place Kamut® berries and 3 cups water in a pot on bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to low. Simmer until soft, about 1 hour. Drain off excess water.

Step 3

Rinse lentils and place in a pot with 3 cups of water. Cover and bring to a boil. Let boil for 2 – 3 minutes then reduce heat to low and simmer until tender, about 25 – 30 minutes. Drain off excess water.

Step 4

Cook macaroni in plenty of boiling salted water until tender, about 6 – 7 minutes. Drain.

Step 5

While grains are cooking, prepare onions and tomato sauce.

Heat oil in a pan to medium-high and cook sliced onions until brown and crispy, about 10 minutes. Remove from pan and drain on paper towels. Season with salt.

Step 6

In the same pan, add garlic, cumin and red pepper flakes and cook until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add tomato puree and cook until heated through. Season with salt and pepper.

Step 7

To serve, combine cooked Kamut® , lentils and macaroni. Top with tomato sauce and crispy onions.

Makes 8 servings.

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Bob's Red Mill :: Millet Stir Fry

Meatless Mondays: Easy Millet Stir Fry

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Happy Tax Day? Happy Monday? Not sure if either of those things go together with the word “happy,” but it is indeed Monday and it is indeed tax day. To start your week off right, make this fresh, simple stir fry for dinner and enjoy a healthy meal that’s easy on your wallet and your time. Millet is wonderful because it cooks fairly quickly and is very nutritious. Unlike most other grains, this versatile, gluten free grain is alkaline, which makes it easy to digest and helps balance the body’s natural tendency towards acidity. Millet is an excellent source of dietary fiber, making it a great solution for those looking to add more fiber to their gluten free diet.

If you don’t have millet handy, check out your store’s bulk section. It’s often stocked and you can grab just a little bit to try,  or substitute quinoa or brown rice in this recipe. Put the millet on and get to work prepping and cooking your other ingredients. In no time, you’ll have a healthy, delicious meal. Here’s to Tuesday!

Bob's Red Mill :: Millet Stir Fry

Millet Stir-Fry

  •     1/2 cup Hulled Millet
  •     2 cups Water
  •     1/2 tsp Sea Salt
  •     2 Tbsp Oil
  •     1 cup sliced Onion
  •     2 cloves Garlic, minced
  •     1 tsp minced fresh Ginger
  •     1 large head of Broccoli, chopped
  •     1 cup sliced Carrot
  •     5 oz canned Water Chestnuts
  •     1/4 cup Cashew Pieces
  •     1 Tbsp Gluten Free Soy Sauce
  •     1 Tbsp Rice Vinegar
  •     2 Tbsp Honey
  •     1 Tbsp Corn Starch

Directions

Step 1

Bring water and salt to a boil. Add millet and return to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for 35 – 40 minutes.

Step 2

Heat oil over medium-high heat in a wok or large pan. Add onion and cook until beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add broccoli, carrots and water chestnut and cook until crisp-tender, 7 – 10 minutes. Add cashews and cooked millet.

Step 3

Combine soy sauce, rice vinegar, honey and cornstarch and pour over vegetables. Cook until dressing is absorbed, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and serve.

 

Makes 4 servings.

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Southwestern Black Bean, Quinoa, and Mango Salad

Meatless Monday with Sharon Palmer, RD: Southwestern Black Bean, Quinoa, and Mango Salad

by Guest in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

As the Plant-Powered Dietitian, I often write and speak about the benefits of vegetarian-style, plant-based eating patterns;  yet, one thing my readers and audience members often appreciate is learning that a plant-based diet is simply one that emphasizes whole plant foods. That is, a plant-powered diet leaves room for a spectrum of dietary preferences and observances, ranging from vegans (those who do not eat any animal foods) to lacto-ovo vegetarians (those who allow for dairy and eggs in their diet) to pescetarian (those who allow for fish) to flexitarians (those who eat small amounts of animal foods).

That’s why I’m such a supporter of the Meatless Monday Campaign—a non-profit initiative developed in association with the John Hopkins’ Bloomberg School of Public Health. It has a simple message: By cutting out meat once per week, you can improve your health and reduce your carbon footprint. By simply substituting animal products in favor of more whole plant foods, you naturally reduce the amount of saturated fat and cholesterol you eat, while gaining more health-promoting nutrients such as fiber, vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. Who can really argue with that? Countless organizations, restaurants, schools, hospitals, and even the entire city of Los Angeles have embraced Meatless Monday to celebrate this simple concept.

The Meatless Monday message helps people ease into the concept of decreasing overall animal intake by selecting just one day per week to go meatless. The initiative provides information and recipes to help people start each week with healthy, eco-friendly, meat-free alternatives.

And I say “eco-friendly” because eating less meat can put a serious dent in your carbon footprint – the total greenhouse gas emissions produced from your activities. According to the Environmental Working Group, here’s how eating less meat can impact Mother Earth:

  • If you eat one less burger per week…It’s like driving 320 miles less.
  • If your four-person family skips meat and cheese one day a week…It’s like taking your car off the road for five weeks.
  • If your four-person family takes steak off the menu one day a week…It’s like taking your car off the road for almost three months.
  • If everyone in the United States ate no meat or cheese for just one day a week…It would be like driving 91 billion miles less, or taking 7.6 million cars off the road.

So, go ahead! Jump on board the Meatless Monday bandwagon, and try one of my simple tips to get you started.

  1. Invest in a good vegetarian cookbook. A cookbook can give home cooks valuable ideas for how to put together simple, delicious meals. Don’t be afraid to experiment!
  2. Keep it simple. There’s a common misconception that preparing vegetarian meals is laborious and complicated – but tons of meatless recipes are incredibly simple to prepare. Think: black bean burritos or spaghetti with tomato sauce.
  3. Convert your family favorites. Trim the meat and load up on the veggies in your favorite dishes. My family’s favorite lasagna originally called for ground meat – but now I load it with summer squash, broccoli, and bell peppers.
  4. Try ethnic flair. Some cultures know how do vegetarian meals right! Steal ideas from your favorite Thai, Indian, or Mexican restaurants and try to reproduce them at home.
  5. Rely on more one-dish meals. Try chili, stews, casseroles, stir-fries, and pasta dishes with whole grains, legumes, tofu, and legumes.

Southwestern Black Bean, Quinoa, and Mango Salad

Southwestern Black Bean, Quinoa, and Mango Salad

By Sharon Palmer, RD, The Plant-Powered Dietitian

The jewel-like black beans shine in this crunchy, zesty salad. Serve it with corn tortillas and vegetable soup for an easy, refreshing meal.

Makes 6 servings (about 1 cup each)

Ingredients:
1 – 15 oz can Black Beans, no salt added, rinsed, drained
1 cup cooked Quinoa (according to package directions)
1 cup frozen Corn
1 small Red Bell Pepper, chopped
1 cup chopped fresh Mango
¼ cup chopped Red Onion
½ cup fresh Cilantro, chopped (or 2 tsp dried if not available)
1 small fresh Jalepeno Pepper, seeded, finely diced
1 Lemon, juiced
1-1/2 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
2 cloves Garlic, minced
½ tsp Cumin
½ tsp Chili Powder
¼ tsp Turmeric

Instructions:

  1. Mix beans, quinoa, corn, pepper, mango, onion, cilantro and jalapeno together in a mixing bowl.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, cumin, chili powder and turmeric together. Toss into salad mixture and chill until serving time.

Nutrition Information Per Serving (1 cup)
Calories: 201
Fat: 5 g
Sat Fat: 1 g
Sodium: 9 mg
Carbohydrate: 36 g
Fiber: 8 g
Protein: 8 g

Recipe from The Plant-Powered Diet: The Lifelong Eating Plan for Achieving Optimal Health, Beginning Today, copyright © Sharon Palmer, 2012. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available June 2012.

110928_151402Sharon Palmer is a registered dietitian, writer and author of The Plant-Powered Diet. Over 750 of her articles have been published in national publications, including Prevention, Better Homes and Gardens and Today’s Dietitian. She is also the editor of the award-winning publication Environmental Nutrition and writes for her blog, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Sharon makes her home with her husband and two sons in the chaparral hills overlooking Los Angeles.

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mangoamaranth2

Meatless Mondays: Amaranth Mango Salad

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

What a perfect way to cure the winter blues. Sure, mangoes aren’t in season, but you know what else isn’t in season in Oregon? Sunshine! This colorful salad is just the ticket to brighten up your day and beat back the doldrums.

mangoamaranth

Amaranth Mango Salad

  •     1/2 cup plain Yogurt
  •     1-1/2 tsp Curry Powder
  •     1 tsp grated Ginger (about 1-inch)
  •     1/2 tsp Sea Salt
  •     1 cup Organic Amaranth Grain
  •     1-1/2 cups Water
  •     1-1/2 cups chopped Mango (about one 1 lb mango)
  •     1/2 cup diced Red Bell Pepper
  •     1 Tbsp diced Jalapeno
  •     1 Tbsp minced fresh Mint
  •     2 Tbsp chopped Cilantro

Directions

Step 1

Combine the yogurt, curry, ginger and salt and chill until ready to use.

Step 2

Bring water to a boil. Add amaranth, reduce heat to low and simmer until water has been absorbed, about 20 – 25 minutes. Remove from heat and drain off excess water.

Step 3

Toss cooked amaranth with mango, bell pepper, jalapeno, herbs and yogurt sauce. Serve immediately or chilled.

 

Makes 4 servings.

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dal1

Meatless Mondays: Chana Dal with Zucchini

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

How about a warm, comforting meal for dinner tonight? The warmth of ginger, turmeric, and coriander, combined with green chilies and a dash of cayenne bring a taste of India to your table. The creaminess of Chana Dal contrasts nicely with crisp zucchini for a dish that you’ll want to snuggle up to on these cold winter nights. Serve this hearty, heart-healthy dish with some warm Naan for an easy, satisfying dinner.  chana dal vegetarian

Chana Dal with Zucchini

This recipe is adapted from Complete Book of Indian Cooking by Suneeta Vaswani.

  •      1 cup Chana Dal Beans
  •     2 Tbsp Oil
  •     1-1/2 Tbsp Ginger Root, peeled and minced
  •     2 tsp Green Chilies, minced
  •     1 cup Onions, finely chopped
  •     3 cups Zucchini, chopped
  •     1 tsp Coriander powder
  •     1/2 tsp Salt (or to taste)
  •     1/2 tsp Tumeric
  •     1/2 tsp Cayenne Pepper
  •     14 oz canned Tomatoes, diced (with juice)

Directions

Soak chana dal in 2 cups cold water for 20- 30 minutes. Rinse and drain.

In a small sauce pan, heat oil over medium- high heat. Add ginger and chilies

and sauté for 1 minute. Add the onions and sauté until soft and translucent, 6 to 7 minutes.

Add zucchini and mix well. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. Add the coriander, salt, turmeric, and cayenne. Mix well and cook, stirring, 3 to 4 minutes making sure not to burn the spices.

Add the tomatoes with juice and chana dal with 2 cups water. Stir well. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to a simmer, covered. Stir every 10 minutes, until chana dal is soft. This should take 20-25 minutes depending on how old you chana dal is.

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arancinicrop

Meatless Mondays: Spinach and Lemon Millet Arancini

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Arancini are little fried rice balls typically stuffed with cheese and meat. This traditional Italian food is usually made with white rice, but our Label Content Manager, Michelle (who also writes the beautiful blog Je Mange la Ville) came up with this version using millet for a delectable whole grain treat. Arancini take a little time, but these are worth every minute! Delight your special someone (or someones) on Valentine’s Day by serving these with a green salad and a wholesome soup. (If millet is hard to come by, try our version using Steel Cut Oats.)

arancini recipes millet

Spinach and Lemon Millet Arancini

(makes 10-12 golf ball-sized arancini)

  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 small Shallot, finely diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • ½ cup Millet
  • ¼ cup White Wine
  • ¼ cup frozen Spinach
  • ½ tsp Lemon Zest
  • 1-3/4 cup low-sodium Vegetable Broth
  • ¼ cup Parmesan Cheese
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • 1 Egg, separated
  • 10-12 small cubes (about ¼-square inch each) fresh Mozzarella
  • ¼ cup All Purpose Flour
  • 1/3 cup Italian Herb Breadcrumbs

Heat olive oil in a pot and sauté shallot and garlic over medium heat, until soft and starting to color, about 5 minutes. Add the millet and toast for 2-3 minutes.

Add the wine, spinach, lemon zest and broth to the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer until liquid is absorbed and millet is soft and a bit creamy, about 20-25 minutes. Stir in Parmesan cheese and add salt and pepper to taste. Let cool.

Add egg yolk to cooled millet mixture and using a small ice cream scoop, scoop some millet into your hand. Add a small cube of mozzarella to the center, rolling the millet around the cheese to form a ball. Repeat with the remaining millet.

Preheat the oven to 375° F. Have flour, bread crumbs and whisked egg white set out in bowls, with a parchment-lined, non stick spray-coated baking sheet nearby. Roll each arancini in the flour, then the egg, and then the bread crumbs. Set on the baking sheet and repeat with each arancini. Spray arancini with non-stick, olive oil spray.

Bake for about 15-20 minutes. Cool 1-2 minutes before serving.

Deep Fry Option:  Add about 3 inches of vegetable or peanut oil in a large pan with tall sides. Heat oil to 350°F. Fry arancini until golden, about 3-4 minutes. Let cool briefly (about 2 minutes) before serving.

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teff1

Meatless Mondays: Teff “Polenta” with Sautéed Chard

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

Teff is one of the most interesting whole grains that we offer, but it often leaves folks scratching their heads wondering how to use it. Teff is quite possibly the world’s smallest grain. It is a traditional staple of Ethiopia, where teff flour is used to make the flat bread Injera. You wouldn’t guess it, but this tiny grain packs a nutritional punch. Because of its small size, each kernel has a higher proportion of bran and germ than other grains. A single quarter-cup serving delivers a healthy dose of fiber (4 grams), protein (7 grams) and calcium (10% of your RDA).

Teff makes a wonderful breakfast porridge, but we were craving something a bit more savory. Our Label Content Manager, Michelle (who also writes the beautiful blog Je Mange la Ville) came up with this extraordinary twist on polenta. Not only is teff nutritionally far superior to corn, it has a complex flavor that is sure to delight your inner foodie. Bonus: this recipe is entirely gluten free!

teff_polenta

Teff “Polenta” with Sautéed Chard

Serves 4-6

  • 4 cups Vegetable Broth
  • 1/2 tsp dried Basil
  • 1/2 tsp dried Thyme
  • 1/4 tsp dried Oregano
  • 1/2 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Teff
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan Cheese
  • 1 tbsp unsalted Butter
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil

For Sautéed Chard:

  • 1 bunch Rainbow Chard
  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 Tbsp Butter
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • 1/8 tsp Pepper
  • 1 medium Onion, diced
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced

Optional: balsamic vinegar for drizzling and shaved Parmesan cheese

For Teff Polenta:

Add broth, basil, thyme, oregano and garlic powder to a pot and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Whisk in Teff, reduce heat to low, cover and cook 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until broth is absorbed. Stir in butter and cheese. Teff should be soft and slightly creamy. Taste and season with salt and pepper.

Spread teff out in a 8-inch (or similar) square pan coated with non-stick spray. Cool to room temperature and then refrigerate at least 2 hours (and up to 24).

When ready to finish polenta: Heat a non-stick skillet with 2 tbsp olive oil, over medium heat. Slice polenta into 4 or 6 squares and sauté in the oil about 3-4 minutes per side, until slightly golden.

For Chard:

Cut stems and center ribs from chard, discarding any tough portions, then cut stems and ribs into 1-inch pieces. Cut chard leaves into 1-inch-wide strips.

Heat oil and butter in a large heavy pot over medium heat until foam subsides, then add onions and garlic, lower heat to low, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions are soft and begin to color, about 8 minutes.

Add the stems and ribs to the pot, along with salt and pepper. Cover and stir occasionally, about 10 minutes.

Add chard leaves to pot and cover. Cook 4-6 minutes until tender and wilted. With a slotted spoon, divide chard among four plates, atop a square of polenta. If using, drizzle with balsamic vinegar and a little shaved Parmesan to finish.

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Millet Spring Roll Salad1

Meatless Mondays: Millet Spring Roll Salad

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

I love this recipe because it’s simple, healthy and has all of the flavor of a spring roll without the hassle! Plus, it uses millet, one of my all-time favorite grains. I made this with crispy pan fried tofu (check out Herbivoracious for a great method) and it was plenty for a meal for two with leftovers. I didn’t try this, but crispy wonton strips would be a fun addition to this salad (awesome how-to video here).

Millet Spring Roll Salad

Millet Spring Roll Salad

Prep Time:        15 minutes + 60 minute rest
Cook Time:       20 minutes
Yield:  10 servings as a side dish

Dressing

  • 1/4 cup Rice Wine Vinegar
  • 1/4 cup Lime Juice
  • 2 Tbsp Toasted Sesame Oil
  • 2 tsp Sriracha Chili Sauce
  • 2 tsp Soy Sauce
  • 1/4 cup Brown Sugar
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced

Salad

  • 1 cup Hulled Millet
  • 4 cups Water
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1 medium Carrot, shredded
  • 1-1/2 cups Green or Napa Cabbage, shredded
  • 1 medium Red Bell Pepper, thinly sliced
  • 15 oz Baby Corn, ½ inch pieces
  • 3 Green Onions, chopped
  • 1/2 cup Cilantro, chopped
  • 1/3 cup Basil, chopped
  • 1/3 cup Mint, chopped
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp Sesame Seeds

Step 1

Bring water and salt to a boil.  Rinse millet and add to boiling water.  Reduce temperature to medium-low and simmer until grains are soft, about 20 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, combine the dressing ingredients and mix well.  Set aside.

Step 3

Drain the cooked millet well and combine with the carrot, cabbage, red bell pepper and corn.  Add dressing and toss well.

Step 4

Chill at least 1 hour or overnight.

Step 5

Add the green onions and herbs and mix well.  Garnish with sesame seeds.  Serve chilled or at room temperature.

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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