What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Amaranth

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is amaranth? Whether consciously or not, it’s likely you’ve seen amaranth growing in your neighborhood. This abundant plant in the pigweed family produces a stunning blossom that is hard to mistake for any other flower. There are over 60 types of amaranth found all over the world from South America to Africa to India and Greece. Several, though not all, subspecies of this weed, for it is truly a weed, produce what we know and love as amaranth grain. Ranging from white to almost black, this whole grain is a nutritional powerhouse with an earthy flavor and pleasant porridge-like texture when cooked.

Amaranth has a fascinating history. Cultivated across the world, its name comes from the Greek words for “unfading” and “flower”. The ancient Aztecs relied on amaranth as a food staple and used it in religious rituals, earning it the names “super grain of the Aztecs” and “golden grain of the gods.” In the 1500s, Spanish conquistadors attempted to outlaw amaranth in an effort to convert and control the Aztecs. Lucky for us, their efforts proved unsuccessful due to amaranth’s amazing ability to grow quickly and thrive in less-than-ideal soil, making it nearly impossible to extinguish.

What is it? Wednesday: Amaranth | Bob's Red Mill

Is it a whole grain? Yes.

Is it gluten free? Yes.

Why is it considered a nutritional powerhouse? Amaranth is a complete protein and boasts a higher protein level than quinoa. It is also high in dietary fiber, magnesium and iron.

How is it used? Amaranth is different from many of its whole grain brethren, in that it doesn’t cook up as individual grains very easily. A pot of amaranth often looks like a pot of porridge. However, if you are looking for a more individualized amaranth it can be popped or toasted before eating. Popped amaranth can be eaten as a cold cereal, sprinkled on salads for a fun topping or used as a coating (such as the mini goat cheese skewers below). Toasted amaranth is fabulous added to baked goods for a nutritious crunch. We like it used as a polenta or risotto for dinner and with sweet toppings for a breakfast porridge.

Our favorite ways to enjoy amaranth:

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orange dijon bulgur salad F

6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

by Claire Gallam in Featured Articles, Recipes

As a food blogger and recipe developer, I’m constantly looking for the big “new” thing. Instead of chicken, I’m buying duck. In place of spaghetti noodles I’m buying soba. I’m constantly looking for a new ingredient that will turn an ordinary dish into something miraculous. And that’s exactly why I bought Bulgur.

It was a few months ago and I was shopping for a rice substitute. That’s when my eyes landed on a bag of Bob’s Red Mill Bulgur. Never having heard of it, I thought “hey, this is kind of unique and exotic. I could use this in place of rice!” I bought it and for months it sat in my cupboard. Finally, on a rainy Tuesday, I ripped open the package and cooked it with some olive oil, fresh herbs and plenty of salt and pepper. After one bite, I was hooked.  The entire bag was gone the following week.

Bob's Red Mill Bulgur

For those who haven’t heard of it (or tried it), bulgur is a wheat grain that has been cracked and partially cooked. It’s very high in fiber, low in fat and calories and is a great addition to vegan and vegetarian entrees. It’s most commonly found in tabbouleh salads, but it’s also popular in pilafs and burgers.

What I love about this grain is how versatile it is. You can sub it in for rice under your favorite stews, you can use it in place of processed noodles in spring pasta salads.  You can even use it in meatballs and meatloaf for a high fiber alternative to the typical unhealthy entrée.

Instead of just telling you all of the amazing ways to use bulgur, why not show you? I’ve rounded up 6 new, exciting and beautiful dishes highlighting this uniquely healthy grain. So what’s stopping you, get your bulgur on!

Cinnamon Banana Breakfast BulgurCinnamon Banana Breakfast Bulgur | 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Move over cream of wheat, this luscious banana bulgur is taking your place! Add a few crunchy walnuts or pecans for a healthier take on banana bread! Grab the recipe here on Tasty Kitchen. Photo by Courtney of Neighborhood Food Blog.

Bulgur Wheat Salad with Orange Mustard Dressing 

Bulgur Wheat Salad with Orange Dijon Dressing| 7 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Forget high carb & high fat pasta and toss in bulgur to your favorite side salads instead, like Gina from Running to the Kitchen did! This high fiber salad is loaded with extra protein from the edamame and has the perfect hint of citrus in the dressing. Grab the recipe on Running to the Kitchen!

Curried Bulgur Sliders

Curried Bulgur Sliders| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Now this is a recipe I could eat everyday! These little sliders use bulgur in place of beef, giving you a much lower fat and healthier slider for your summertime BBQ’s. Plus, the addition of curry gives each bite the perfect added spice. I could easily eat 10 of these, couldn’t you? Grab the recipe on Bev Cooks!

Vegan Bulgur Chili
Creamy Bulgur Chili| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Even though the temperatures outside are hot, that’s not going to stop me from eating chili. This vegetarian rendition is made with wheat bulgur and beans and is topped with fresh summer produce like yellow tomatoes, herbs and red onion.  This would make a great Sunday night dinner (that’ll keep in the freezer for a later date too!) Grab the recipe here on Naturally Ella.

Bulgur and Spinach Pilaf

Bulgur and Spinach Pilaf| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

I don’t know what I love more with this recipe, the hearty and flavorful bulgur pilaf or the creamy caramelized onions on top! If you need a healthy potluck dish for your spring or summer parties, look no further than this pilaf. Plus it’s completely vegan for your non-dairy and meat-free friends. Grab the recipe on Joanne Eats Well With Others.

Bulgur Moroccan Salad

Bulgur Moroccan Salad| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

I’ve been obsessed with Morrocan flavors lately so this salad is right up my alleyway. The bulgur adds a nice pack of fiber while the creamy cilantro orange dressing gives each bite a rich, zesty flavor. This is one salad I’d never get tired of. Grab the recipe on Pinch of Yum.

Claire GallamClaire is a cookbook author, food writer and recipe creator, soon-to-be culinary student and avid world traveler. She is recently married to a social media guru who loves *almost* everything she conjures up. She writes full-time for the Food section of SheKnowsFabulousFoods.com and is a contributing writer for the Travel section of SheKnows. You can also follow her daily musings and find delicious healthy recipes on her food blog, The Realistic Nutritionist. Follow Claire on Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with her newest creations. 

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apple crisp topping H

Pancake Topping Ideas

by Julia Mueller in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Hi everyone! Julia from The Roasted Root here, checking in to talk to you about topping your pancakes in the utmost delicious ways!  We all know it’s tough to beat a Saturday morning stack of pure pancake lovin’, but sometimes we get stuck in the same ol’ butter and maple syrup routine and overlook the variety of flavor, texture, and (believe it or not) nutrition that we can inject into our pancake sessions. Fret not: I’m here to help break the mold and give you healthful ideas to make your pancake endeavors that much more pleasing.

Because I eat a wheat-free diet, I have taken a personal interest in developing gluten-free pancake recipes using an assortment of Bob’s Red Mill’s gluten-free flours and nut meals. From Almond Flour Pancakes, Lemon Poppy Seed Coconut Flour Pancakes, to Brown Rice Flour Banana Pancakes, whipping up fun and inviting hot cake recipes is a big hobby of mine.Pancakes with peaches, chia seeds, and honey

But let’s talk toppings! Yes, I have been known to eat pancakes layered with fried egg and bacon. Ham and cheese? Check! All sorts of fruit, yogurt, nut, and homemade syrup concoctions? Always on board! I’ve even made chocolate syrup using coconut milk, cocoa powder, and pure maple syrup. In essence, I always enjoy coming up with new ways of serving pancakes.

Let’s face it: butter and store-bought syrup is tough to beat as a pancake topping; however, unless you buy pure maple syrup, which can be expensive, you end up using syrup that is full of artificial ingredients and cane sugar. From fresh fruit and nuts to compotes or homemade syrups, many toppings don’t require much time at all, just a little forethought. Let’s gather some ideas for our next stack of pancakes, shall we?!

Pancakes with Peanut butter and Banana

Fruit, nuts, yogurt, seeds, nut butters:

I love chopping fresh fruit and adding it to a pancake breakfast, along with raw nuts, yogurt, seeds, and/or nut butters. Peanut butter and banana will always win me over. I also love fresh mango or pineapple along with chia seeds and/or pumpkin seeds.  Taking the raw and fresh route is fast, easy, adds health benefits to your meal and helps avoid the temptation to douse a stack of pancakes with syrup.

Pancakes with Coconut Milk, Mango, Walnut

Fruit Compote:

Compote is made by heating fruit, a small amount of liquid and sweetener in a saucepan and allowing it to gently boil until it softens and becomes juicy.  For soft fruit (like berries), this process only takes about 15 minutes. For heartier fruit (such as apples and pears), the process takes about 35 to 40 minutes. I like to add a little bit of a natural sweetener, such as honey or pure maple syrup, in order to keep the compote healthful yet sweet. Mimicking apple or berry crisp using fruit compote and granola makes for such a treat, and makes you feel like you’re eating dessert for breakfast!

Pancakes with Raspberry Syrup

Homemade Syrup:

Homemade syrups are easier than you’d think! They can be made using a large variety of fresh fruit. You simply start by cooking your fruit of choice with water and sweetener (just like you would a compote), and then strain the fruit pulp in order to achieve a syrup.  You can add your desired amount of pure maple syrup or honey in order to sweeten the syrup to your liking.

In addition to a fruit-based syrup, did you know you could make thick, creamy toppings using full-fat coconut milk?  Simply heat up a can of coconut milk and allow it to boil for 40 to 50 minutes until it thickens. You can keep it simple by adding a natural sweetener and vanilla extract. For a citrus-y topping, add lemon zest, a small amount of lemon juice, and maple syrup. Also try a chocolate-y topping by mixing the coconut milk with cocoa powder, a pinch of cinnamon, and some pure maple syrup for a decadent yet healthful treat!

Pancake topping ideas from Bob's Red Mill

Topping Ideas:

  1. Plain Greek yogurt (or crème fraiche) and fresh berries
  2. Almond, peanut, or cashew butter and sliced banana
  3. Fresh chopped peaches, honey and chia seeds or pumpkin seeds
  4. Full-fat coconut milk, chopped mango, chopped walnuts
  5. Bob’s Red Mill’s Blueberry Chia Jam and chopped nuts
  6. Homemade chocolate syrup using canned coconut milk
  7. Fried egg and bacon
  8. Country-style ham and cheddar cheese
  9. Apple Crisp Topping (see recipe below!)
  10. Blueberry, blackberry, pear, or apple compote (see recipe for blueberry compote below)

What are your favorite pancake toppings?

Pancakes with apple crisp topping

Apple Crisp Topping

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients except for the granola to a medium-sized pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and allow the mixture to boil gently for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover, stir in ¼ to ½ cup of granola and continue to cook until most of the moisture has burned off.
  2. Add desired amount of topping to fresh-off-the-griddle pancakes.

Blueberry Compote/Syrup:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 3 to 4 Tbsp Water
  • 2 Tbsp Pure Maple Syrup
  • Pinch of Salt

Instructions:

  1. In a small pot, heat all of the ingredients until mixture comes to a full boil.
  2. Reduce heat, cover, and allow mixture to gently boil until blueberries are juicing out and have softened, about 15 minutes.
  3. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture has thickened and berries are coated with a syrupy consistency, about 5 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately on pancakes or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week and reheat when ready to use.

JuliaMuellerJulia Mueller’s two greatest passions are food and the great outdoors. Creator of the food blog, The Roasted Root, Julia enjoys whipping up and photographing nutrient-dense recipes that are healthful yet comforting, and are approachable to make any night of the week. Most of her recipes are vegetable and meat-based, gluten-free and refined-sugar free. Julia is also the author of the cookbooks, Delicious Probiotic Drinks, and Let Them Eat Kale! An avid mountain biker and snowboarder, Julia enjoys balancing work with playing outside in the mountains. Keep up with her onFacebook and Twitter.

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Buckwheat Blini Bites

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Blinis are a thin, crepe-like pancake, often made with buckwheat flour. We’ve taken our Buckwheat Pancake Mix and created these bite-size blinis that are perfect for brunch and hors d’oeuvres. Of course, if you don’t have access to our buckwheat pancake mix, you can use any of our pancake mixes for a similar result. We’ve included some suggested toppings below for sweet or savory combinations. If you’re short on time, watch the video at the end of the post for a quick method for making these lovely little pancakes. Make these for your next party and watch how quickly they disappear!

Buckwheat Blini Bites | Bob's Red Mill

Buckwheat Blini Bites

Contributed by:  Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen

Prep Time:  10 minutes | Rest Time:  90 minutes | Cook Time:  10 minutes

Yield: 40 blinis (10 servings)

Step 1

Combine warm milk, sugar and yeast and let sit until yeast has dissolved, about 5 minutes.

Step 2

Whisk in eggs and butter, then Bob’s Red Mill Buckwheat Pancake Mix.  Cover and let rest until bubbly, about 90 – 120 minutes.

Step 3

Oil or butter a nonstick skillet and heat over medium-high heat.  Pour 1 Tbsp batter onto skillet per blini and cook until edges are set and bubbles have formed on the top, about 2 minutes.  Flip and cook on the second side, 1 – 2 minutes.  Serve immediately or hold warm in a 200°F oven.Bite-Size Buckwheat Blinis | Bob's Red Mill

Savory topping ideas:

  • Creme fraiche, sliced cherry tomatoes and basil
  • Ricotta cheese, smoked salmon, sprig of dill
  • Sour cream, a sprinkling of paprika and chives (see photo at the beginning of the post)

Sweet topping ideas:

  • Sliced strawberries, chocolate hazelnut spread, dollop of whipped cream
  • Sliced figs, goat cheese, drizzle of honey

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

It’s Monday again, which means it’s Meatless Monday around here. At least, for many of us, it’s a short week! In honor of the upcoming holiday, I’ve gathered together 10 of our favorite meatless dishes for the Fourth of July. Each of these will satisfy carnivores and vegetarians alike and make it easy to please everyone no matter what you’re doing on Friday. 10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Coconut Hazelnut Shrimp by Cara Lyons for Bobs Red Mill F

Coconut-Hazelnut Shrimp with Grilled Peach Salsa {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Hearty pie crusts, chewy cookies, tender cupcakes, anything with chocolate. These are probably the things most home cooks think about upon hearing that Bob’s Red Mill now sells Hazelnut Meal. Is there something wrong with me that my first thoughts were asparagus and fish? That’s where I started and that’s mostly how we’ve been enjoying this awesomely versatile ingredient!

I’ll even confess, this stuff made it so easy to throw together a simple yet upscale meal, I had trouble getting to the point of actually writing a jazzed up recipe. But summer’s coming, and I’ve been excited by the fresh, sweet peaches finally popping up in the supermarket. Peaches and hazelnuts actually make a perfect pair! Throw some shrimp into the mix and you’ve got a savory, scrumptious summer recipe.

Coconut shrimp used to be one of those special things I thought reserved for restaurants. That’s until I realized they’re actually easy-peasy to make at home. And even more flavorful when you mix up the traditional coconut-breadcrumb topping with nuts. Slightly sweet, buttery hazelnuts are the perfect compliment to coconut, both of which taste even better when toasted.

So, while I know you’ll want to get your hands on some hazelnut meal to make a decadent dessert, don’t forget to save some for this sweet summer dinner.

Coconut Hazelnut Shrimp by Cara Lyons for Bobs Red Mill

Coconut-Hazelnut Shrimp with Grilled Peach Salsa

Recipe and Photos by Cara Lyons

Serves 3-4

Salsa Ingredients

  • 3 Peaches, halved and pitted
  • Olive Oil Cooking Spray
  • ¼ teaspoon Cinnamon
  • ½ cup chopped Red Onion
  • ½ cup chopped Red Bell Pepper
  • 1 Jalapeno Pepper, seeded and minced
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed Lime Juice
  • 1 teaspoon ground Cumin
  • ½ teaspoon Salt
  • ¼ cup chopped Cilantro

Shrimp Ingredients

Directions

Preheat grill to medium heat. Mist both sides of peach halves with cooking spray and sprinkle the flesh sides with cinnamon. Place cut side down on the grill for 5-6 more; flip and cook for another 5-6 minutes until softened and charred. Remove from grill and set aside to cool.

In a medium bowl, combine remaining salsa ingredients. When peaches are cool enough to handle, slip the skins off and chop. Stir into the salsa. Refrigerate for 30 minutes to blend flavors.

Meanwhile, prepare the shrimp. Preheat oven to 400ºF. Place a wire rack over a baking sheet and mix with cooking spray.

Place arrowroot starch in a baking dish or pie dish. Add egg to a small bowl and beat with a fork. Combine hazelnut meal, coconut and ginger in another baking dish or pie dish. Working with a few shrimp at a time, dredge each one through the arrowroot starch and shake off excess, then dip in egg and then hazelnut mixture, turning to coat all sides. Place on the wire rack and repeat with remaining shrimp. Mist tops of shrimp with cooking spray.

Bake for 10 minutes, then turn on broiler and cook for another 2-3 minutes, until tops are lightly browned. Serve hot with peach salsa.

Cara Lyons | Cara's CravingsCara Lyons is a freelance recipe developer and food blogger from Worcester, Massachusetts. She enjoys working with nutrient-dense, whole foods to create food for all to enjoy; many of her recipes are gluten-free and dairy-free by choice. Look for her recipes at carascravings.com, and in Clean Eating Magazine and Simply Gluten Free Magazine. 

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Sorghum

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is sorghum? Also know as milo, sorghum is a grain that originated in Africa thousands of years ago. It spread throughout the Middle East with traders, ultimately becoming a staple of the region and is still a heavily consumed grain in India. Though sorghum as a food is relatively unknown in most parts of the world, it has long been used as animal feed and for the production of sorghum syrup/molasses. (Interestingly, sorghum syrup is much more labor intensive than traditional cane and beet molasses. It’s production in the United States fell dramatically after World War II and is now more of a specialty regional item in the South.)

What is it? Wednesday: Sorghum | Bob's Red Mill

Is sorghum a whole grain? Yes, sorghum is a whole grain. The variety we offer is a round, golden kernel that is about the size of large pearl tapioca.

Is sorghum gluten free? Yes, sorghum is inherently gluten free. The grain and the flour we produce are made in our gluten free facility and tested for gluten.

What does it taste like? Sorghum has a mild, earthy flavor. It’s texture and flavor is similar to wheat berries and the flour has been called out as being the most wheat-like gluten free flour.

How do you use sorghum? Sorghum can be used in soups, salads, side dishes, pilafs and more. It makes a great substitute for wheat berries, pearl couscous and other gluten-full grains in most recipes. One of our favorite ways to enjoy sorghum is to pop it. It makes perfect little miniature “popcorn” that the kid in all of us will enjoy. Check out the video below for directions.

What about sorghum flour? Milled from whole grain sorghum, this flour is a great addition to gluten free baked goods. It has a good amount of protein and, when used in baking, helps with browning (something gluten free baked goods often struggle with). The protein also helps replicate the lost gluten, providing a more wheat-like texture.

Some of our favorite ways to enjoy whole grain sorghum:

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Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe's | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Monday: Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe’s

by Sarena Shasteen in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

In a family of meat eaters, non-meat eaters, celiacs, gluten intolerance, lactose intolerance, soy allergies and well, the usual personal picky preferences, coming up with meals that everyone will or can eat is sometimes a challenge. I won’t lie, we sometimes all eat different things, but for the most part, I like to keep things simple and have us all eat the same thing at meal times. After years of trial and error, I have found that playing around with old favorites by replacing a few things with new ingredients is my best option. This gives me a fighting changes when I’m changing things up so the guys here have a frame of reference when I tell them what’s for dinner. If I say “Sloppy Joe’s” they are all on board. If I try to get too descriptive, well, that will lead to a conversation that may not go in my favor. I keep things simple and no one is the wiser…

I love sorghum and the guys here do, too. The fact that it’s high in fiber and has a good protein content makes it a great addition to our meat free nights. Texture is a huge consideration for me when I’m playing around with recipes in the kitchen. I have some picky palates in the texture arena here. I like to consider foods that would ordinarily have a certain texture when I’m swapping out ingredients. This time around I went for a meatless sloppy joe. I combined sorghum and lentils to give my version of a sloppy joe that signature thick rich texture to hold up on the buns. These Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe’s did not disappoint either. They are full of flavor packed with wholesome ingredients and they are kid approved!

I served mine as sliders on cheesy tapioca rolls. You can never go wrong with making meals fun with finger foods either.

Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe's | Bob's Red Mill

Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe’s

(makes about 3 cups)

  • 1 medium Red Bell Pepper, diced small
  • 1 medium Onion, diced small
  • 2 tsp Olive Oil
  • 3/4 cup Whole Grain Sorghum
  • 3 cups Vegetable Stock
  • 3/4 cup Lentils
  • 1 (15 oz) can Tomato Sauce
  • 1 TBSP Cumin
  • 1 TBSP Chili Powder
  • 2 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 1 TBSP Honey or Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Salt

In a skillet, heat olive oil on medium heat. Add bell pepper and onion to the oil. Sauté until the vegetables are tender and the onions are translucent.

Next add sorghum and vegetable stock to the vegetables. Turn to high heat to bring the mixture to a boil. Once boiling, place a lid on the pan and turn the heat to low. Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add lentils to the pan turning the heat back up to boil. Once boiling, return the lid to the pan and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add tomato sauce through salt to the sorghum lentil mixture. Turn the heat to medium and simmer. Stir frequently to avoid sticking to the pan. Cook until the mixture has reduced and thickened. This will take about 20 to 30 minutes.

Serve on your favorite rolls.

Sarena Shasteen: The Non Dairy QueenSarena Shasteen has been an avid health food and fitness enthusiast from an early age. She holds a degree in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Atlanta, a certification in Fitness Nutrition and is a certified Fitness Trainer from International Sport Science Association (ISSA). Becoming a Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition has been a lifelong goal of hers. Sarena enjoys helping others reach their health goals by teaching them that health and fitness are not only achieved in the gym, but also through fun everyday activities. Now a food writer, recipe developer, personal chef,  Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition, she enjoys sharing with others that healthy living can be fun and delicious. Keep up with her at The Non Dairy Queen and on Facebook and Twitter.

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Salad Group F

10 Best Salads for Summer

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

In honor of what might possibly be my favorite day of the year and, irrefutably the longest, here are our top 10 go-to summer salads. Whether it’s a fancy dinner party, casual barbecue or a day at the beach, each of these is perfect for your next gathering. If you can believe it, NOT A SINGLE ONE of these salads uses mayonnaise making them much more party friendly. Substitute gluten free grains in place of those featured to make these dishes allergen-friendly. Quinoa, whole grain sorghum and long grain brown rice are some of our favorite gluten free salad grains.

Sit back, relax and enjoy some wholesome whole grain goodness on this, the first day of summer!

10 Best Salads for Summer | Bob's Red Mill

Curried Carrots and Sorghum Salad
Mediterranean Farro Salad
Millet Spring Roll Salad

10 Best Salads for Summer | Bob's Red Mill

Buckwheat Pesto Salad
Farro Caprese Salad
Vegetable Bounty Quinoa Salad with Asian Vinaigrette

10 Best Salads for Summer | Bob's Red Mill

Tabbouleh
Greek Garbanzo Bean Salad
French Bean and Kamut® Berry Salad
Barley Salad in Radicchio Bowls with Champagne-Orange Vinaigrette

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Maple Bacon Butternut Squash Farrotto F

Maple and Bacon Butternut Squash Farrotto

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Recipes

We love risotto and have become big fans of this elegant, farro-based version. Farro is a healthier alternative to arborio rice and gives this dish a little more bite than traditional risotto. Don’t get me wrong, this dish is still creamy and rich with sweet chunks of roasted butternut squash and crispy bits of salty bacon. The maple syrup brings these two flavors into harmony with a touch of nutmeg and sage to balance it out. Serve this for your next dinner gathering and surprise everyone with your culinary prowess and insider knowledge of farro. Make this with gluten free steel cut oats for a gluten free version.

Maple Bacon Butternut Squash Farrotto | Bob's Red Mill

Maple Bacon and Butternut Squash Farrotto

  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Organic Farro
  • 5 to 6 cups Chicken or Vegetable Broth
  • 3 strips Bacon, diced
  • 1/2 cup Butter
  • 1/2 cup Shallot or Onion, finely diced
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • 1 tsp Nutmeg
  • 1/2 cup Dry White Wine
  • 1-1/2 cups roasted Butternut Squash (cubes or mash)
  • 1 cup Parmesan Cheese, grated
  • 3 Tbsp Maple Syrup
  • 5 Sage leaves, torn into small pieces
  • Sea Salt and Pepper, to taste

Soak farro overnight. Drain and rinse.

Pour broth into a small pot and heat on low.

Fry bacon pieces in medium pot until crisp. Remove bacon and set aside, keeping 1 Tbsp rendered bacon fat in pot. Add butter and diced shallots or onion, sauteing over medium heat until soft, about 2 minutes. Add garlic, nutmeg and farro, toasting for 1- 2 minutes.

Add white wine and simmer until liquid has evaporated, add broth a few ladles at a time, allowing liquid to evaporate completely before adding more broth. Stir frequently to keep farrotto from sticking.

When all broth has been added, remove from heat. Add butternut squash, Parmesan cheese, maple syrup and sage. Season with sea salt and pepper.

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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