Baguette F

Gluten-Free Baguette {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Gluten Free, Recipes

I bet you’re probably beginning to think I love all cookbooks. Rest assured, that’s not the case. If I don’t think it has some merit, we’re definitely not wasting our time talking about it here. I’ve been excited about a lot of gluten free cookbooks this year because so many of them are making waves with gluten free ingredients by using techniques and ingredient combinations that are new and innovative.

GF Artisan Bread in Five

Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day from Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François is a game-changer for a few noteworthy reasons.

1. It is built on the principal of the famous no-knead bread recipe. It works well with gluten and it works superbly for gluten free bread. After all, gluten free bread does not really need to be kneaded at all. It really just needs to be mixed. Kneading activates gluten. When you don’t have gluten, you don’t need to knead. (Yep, ridiculously pleased with myself for that little gem.)

2. The book features two basic flour blends- all purpose and whole grain- and uses them for everything under the sun- from crusty baguettes to gooey monkey bread to ciabatta to chocolate ganache filled brioche. All that from one flour blend!

3. The trickiest ingredient is ground pysllium husk and that is becoming increasingly easy to find and it’s optional!

4. This is a mix it and leave it method. You mix up your ingredients (no kneading!), let it rise and stick it in the fridge. On baking day, you take out a chunk, form a loaf and let it rise for an hour. Then, you bake. You have to admit, it’s much faster than traditional bread baking.

On top of this, I’ve been using one of their previous books, Healthy Bread in Five Minutes a Day, for years and it works. It’s reliable and always turns out wonderful breads. As due diligence to write this review (and an excuse to enjoy fresh baked bread), I had the test kitchen bake up a loaf of the classic boule. It was the best gluten free bread I have ever tried and I’ve tried a lot of less-than-stellar gluten free bread. I don’t need to be gluten free, but I figured I should taste this bread if I was going to try to sell you on the book. The loaf was crusty, had a lovely crumb and, above all, had a wonderfully wheat-like flavor.

Our friends Jeff and Zoë, and the folks at St Martin’s Press, have generously offered a copy of this book for three lucky winners. We will pair it with the winner’s choice of the ingredients to make the all purpose flour blend or the whole grain flour blend. To enter, simply comment on this post and tell us what type of artisan bread you miss the most since going gluten free. We’ll select three winner at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 11/24/14. If you can’t wait or want to give this as a gift (this would be an awesome gift for a gluten free loved one) you can buy it here: Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Indiebound, iBooks and Walmart. I’d bet that your favorite local book seller will also have a copy.

Gluten Free Baguette from Gluten Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day | Bob's Red Mill

Gluten-Free Baguette

Recipe adapted from Gluten-Free Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day and used with permission
©2014, Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François

Makes eight ½-pound loaves. The recipe is easily doubled or halved.

This beautiful and crispy loaf is the symbol of France. Our gluten-free version is just as gorgeous and delicious.  We brush the top of the loaf with egg white wash to create a glossy crust, but in a pinch, water will do.

Ingredients

  • 6½ cups of Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour (see GFBreadIn5.com/GFmix)
  • 1 tablespoon Granulated Yeast
  • 1-1½ tablespoons Kosher Salt
  • 2 tablespoons Sugar or Honey
  • 3¾ cups lukewarm Water (100°F or below)
  • Cornmeal or parchment paper, for the pizza peel
  • Egg White Wash (1 Egg White plus 1 tablespoon Water), for top of loaf
  1. Mixing and storing the dough: Whisk together the flour, yeast, salt, and sweetener in a 5- to 6-quart bowl, or a lidded (not airtight) food container.
  2. Add the water and mix with a spoon or a heavy-duty stand mixer fitted with the paddle.
  3.  Cover (not airtight), and rest at room temperature until the dough rises, about 2 hours.
  4. The dough can be used immediately after rising, though it’s easier to handle when cold. Refrigerate in a lidded (not airtight) container and use over the next 10 days. Or freeze for up to 4 weeks in 1-pound portions and thaw in the refrigerator overnight before use.
  5. On baking day: Dust the surface of the dough with rice flour, pull off a ½ -pound (orange-size) piece, and place it on a pizza peel prepared with cornmeal (use plenty) or parchment paper. Gently press and pat it into a log-shape with tapered ends, using wet fingers to smooth the surface. Allow to rest for about 40 minutes, loosely covered with plastic wrap or a roomy overturned bowl. During this time, the dough may not seem to rise much, which is normal.
  6. Preheat a baking stone near the middle of the oven to 450°F (20 to 30 minutes), with an empty metal broiler tray on any shelf that won’t interfere with rising bread.
  7. Brush the top with egg white wash, and then slash, about ½-inch deep, with a wet serrated bread knife.
  8. Slide the loaf onto the hot stone. Pour 1 cup of hot tap water into the broiler tray, and quickly close the oven door. Bake for about 35 minutes, or until richly browned and firm.
  9. Allow to cool completely on a rack before eating.

The authors answer questions at GFBreadin5.com, where you’ll also find recipes, photos, videos and instructional material.

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Ciabatta Bread F

Baker’s Dozen: Essential Tips and Tricks for Baking Success

by Stephanie Wise in Featured Articles

In my five years of baking and blogging about bread, I’ve acquired a few bits of knowledge on the subject along the way. This doesn’t mean I don’t have oh-so-much more to learn – believe me, I do, as I am often reminded by a recipe fail – but thanks to these handy tips and tricks, I’m much better off than I used to be (sayonara, loaves of bricks!).

Because I want everyone in the whole world to know how to bake a good loaf of bread because there are few better things to bake and eat from scratch, in my opinion, I’m going to share some of those tips and tricks with you – a “baker’s dozen” of handy knowledge, if you will – along with a few delicious recipes from me and other Bob’s Red Mill bloggers that can help you get started!

  1. Know the difference between active dry and instant yeast. Instant yeast can be directly added to the dry ingredients in your recipe, while active dry yeast most often needs to be activated before it can be added to the remaining ingredients. To activate active dry yeast, dissolve the yeast in a bowl of warm water (sometimes with some sugar or honey, too) and let it sit until foamy. The amounts of these ingredients should be indicated in the recipe, for example, in this recipe for Whole Wheat Focaccia Bread with Caramelized Onions from The Roasted Root. Some people like using instant yeast because you can skip a step, but I prefer to use active dry yeast in most of my recipes so I know the yeast is fresh.
  2. Some flours cannot be substituted for another. Sometimes, yes, they can, but when you come across a situation when they can’t, you’ll know it. For instance, in my recipe for Whole Wheat Honey Oatmeal Bread, it’s best to use the ratio of all-purpose flour to whole wheat flour called for so you don’t end up with the aforementioned “brick loaf.” Whole wheat flour needs more water to absorb to yield the same result as all-purpose flour with less water, but even with some tweaking of the recipe, it doesn’t always work. That being said, I will sometimes substitute up to 75 percent of the all-purpose flour called for in a recipe with whole wheat flour, but no more. The same goes for bread vs. all-purpose flour – bread flour has a higher gluten content, so when a recipe calls for it, it’s probably because it will give the bread the extra shape and sturdiness it needs. In those cases, I often suggest just sticking with whatever the recipe calls for.

  3. Check the expiration dates. This is a big one, because I think many of our recipe failures can be attributed to it. So be sure you have the freshest ingredients on hand: Baking soda, baking powder, yeast, nuts and even whole wheat flour can all lose their oomph over time. I like to keep my flours in the fridge to extend their shelf lives, and on my jar of yeast (which I also refrigerate) I’ll write the date six months from when I’ve opened it, which is when it tends to lose its freshness.
  4. How to make your own ingredients. You’ve got the oven pre-heating. You’ve got the mixing bowls set out. And then you realize you’re missing a key ingredient. Raise your hand if you’ve been there! Yeah, me too. That’s when knowing how to make your own ingredients comes in handy. Here are a few examples:
  • Buttermilk: Combine 1 tablespoon lemon juice to a scant cup of milk for every cup of buttermilk you need for the recipe. Let it sit for five minutes.
  • Cake Flour: Remove 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour for every cup you need for the recipe and replace it with cornstarch. Sift the ingredients together about four or five times.
  • Bread Flour: Remove 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour for every cup you need for the recipe and replace it with gluten additive. Stir it in.
  • Homemade Butter: Savory Simple has a fantastic tutorial on how to make your own!
  1. How to halve ingredients in a recipe. There are times when a recipe makes a double batch, or I just don’t need all of those muffins or pancakes, so I’ll halve the recipe. That’s when this nifty guide comes in handy.
  2. Keep fruit from sinking to the bottom of baked goods. Easy-peasy: Give the berries or pieces of fruit a good toss in one or two tablespoons of the flour called for in the recipe, then add them to the batter. This isn’t necessary for yeast breads, as the dough is sturdy enough to hold up the fruit. Here’s a great recipe for Blueberry Oatmeal Bread from The Lemon Bowl to give it a try on.

  3. Less is more. If there is nothing else you take from this list, let this be the one mantra you keep with you for baking. It never fails me, especially when it comes to working with dough. The less you play with the dough after it’s fully kneaded, the better. The less flour you add to it to make it a smooth, soft, pliable, elastic, tacky (but not sticky) dough, the better. The less flour you sprinkle on a surface to knead or shape the dough, the better.
  4. Know when bread is fully kneaded. Solution: The windowpane test. Once you’ve kneaded your dough, remove a small piece of it and stretch it out between your fingers to a thin membrane. If the dough breaks, it needs a little more kneading. If it stays thin and translucent, it’s ready.
  5. Make dough rise really well. If it’s the cooler seasons (meaning, it’s sub-70 degrees in your kitchen), I’ve found this trick works well to helping dough proof better: Wrap a heating pad in a thin towel, turn it on low heat and set it on a counter. Place the dough, in a covered bowl or loaf pan, on top of the wrapped heating pad. The little bit of added heat from the pad will help the dough along. Don’t have a heating pad? Place the bowl or loaf pan in the microwave or oven, turned off.
  6. How to test when a dough is doubled. I’m a big fan of eyeballing it, but for extra accuracy, place a strip of tape on the side of the bowl to gauge when the dough is doubled, or, lightly press two fingers into the top of the risen dough. If the indentations remain, the dough has doubled.

  7. How to tell when a loaf is fully baked. Take the loaf out of the oven and give it a tap on the bottom with your fingernails. If it makes a good “thwacking” sound, like it’s almost hollow, it’s probably done. But to be extra sure, insert an instant-read thermometer in the bottom center. For regular yeast breads, 210°F to 220°F is ideal; if it’s an egg or milk-based yeast bread – like this recipe for Apple Honey Challah from The Law Student’s Wife – or has a few extra ingredients in it (like nuts or veggies), aim for 200°F to 210°F. This does not apply to quick breads.
  8. How to store yeast breads. Crusty loaves store well in a paper bag and soft, milk or egg-based enriched breads store well in an airtight container or plastic wrap. Both can be stored at room temperature for a day or two before they get stale, but I like to refrigerate my breads to extend their lives (this is a huge no-no to some because it can alter the flavor of the bread, but I’d rather keep my bread around for longer). If you want to freeze bread, wrap it tightly in plastic wrap, then foil.
  9. Have great baking resources at the ready. Bob’s Red Mill has oodles of resources, products and articles that will help you along on your baking journey!

StephanieStephanie is the baker/blogger/babbler behind the blog, Girl Versus Dough, where she writes about her adventures in bread baking and other tasty, unique recipes. Her approach is friendly yet inspiring, down-to-earth yet adventurous. She lives in the Twin Cities with her husband, Elliott, her furry child-cat, Percy and a beautiful baby girl, Avery. Keep up with her on Facebook and Twitter

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Artisan Bread Flour

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday

What is bread flour? Our Artisan Bread Flour is milled from high-protein US-grown red wheat and mixed with just the right amount of malted barley flour, which helps breads rise. The high protein content is great for gluten development, which is especially desirable for chewy baguettes, pizza crusts, dinner rolls, sandwich loaves, pretzels, bagels and more.

How much protein does Bob’s Red Mill Artisan Bread Flour contain? Our bread flour averages 12-14% protein.

Why does protein (gluten) matter? The protein in wheat flour (aka gluten) gives baked goods structure and elasticity. For chewy breads and pizza crusts, you want to use a higher protein flour.

Gluten is sticky and stretchy (think of a balloon). When leavening reacts and produces gasses in your baked good, gluten creates pockets that expand around these gasses, causing your baked good to rise. More gluten and high-power leavening (yeast) will make beautiful artisan breads with lovely air pockets. Less gluten and tamer leavening (baking soda, baking powder), make smaller bubbles and smaller air pockets. When you’re striving to create a rustic artisan loaf of bread, you want big air pockets, making bread flour an ideal choice.

What is it? Wednesday: Artisan Bread Flour | Bob's Red Mill

How is it different from all purpose flour? Bread flour simply contains a higher amount of protein than all purpose flour. All purpose flour is designed to make fine cakes and chewy breads. Bread flour is made with bread baking specifically in mind. Using it will yield crusty loaves of bread and chewy pizza crusts.

Why would you use this instead of all purpose flour? Because you can. When you want to make the most perfect, rustic loaves of bread, the real question is why wouldn’t you want to use special ingredients? After all, fresh baked bread is just another way of saying “I love you.” In all seriousness, though, bread flour produces a chewier texture, better rise and crisper crust than all purpose flour.

Is bread flour gluten free? No. Bread flour is made from wheat and has a higher proportion of gluten than many other wheat flours, so it is definitely not suitable for a gluten free diet.

Is Bob’s Red Mill bread flour organic? No.

Is Bob’s Red Mill bread flour enriched? Yes, we enrich our bread flour to government standards. This includes adding malted barley flour (to improve the rise), niacin, iron, thiamin, riboflavin and folic acid.

Is Bob’s Red Mill bread flour whole grain? Nope. If you want a whole grain bread flour, we recommend our traditional Whole Wheat Flour or our Ivory Wheat Flour. Both are high in protein and made with 100% whole grain wheat.

Is there a substitute for bread flour? No, but you can replicate bread flour by using an all purpose flour and adding extra gluten to increase the protein content. We recommend an extra tablespoon of gluten per cup of flour.

Some of our favorite recipes using bread flour: 

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Super-Fine Cake Flour

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday

What is cake flour? Cake flour is a low protein white flour made from wheat. Its fine texture makes it ideal for delicate cake baking. Unlike many other brands, our Super-Fine Cake Flour is simply highly sifted, finely ground wheat flour. Some brands add cornstarch to dilute otherwise high protein wheat flour (we call this a cheap trick around here). Instead of finding a low protein wheat, other manufacturers use the same high protein wheat and cut it with cornstarch. Our cake flour has not been bleached, another common practice among flour purveyors. While bleaching can help create perfectly white cakes and aid in the baking of a cake, our test kitchen produced stellar (and oh-so-delicious) white cakes. At Bob’s Red Mill, we think baking with chemically treated flours cut with cornstarch is a little yucky. No, thank you.

How is it different from all purpose flour? Cake flour is finer and contains less protein than all purpose flour. All purpose flour is designed to be just that- all purpose. All purpose flour is designed to make fine cakes and chewy breads. Cake flour is made with cake baking specifically in mind. It creates a lighter crumb that is perfect for delicate treats, soft cookies and airy cakes.

What is it? Wednesday: Cake Flour | Bob's Red Mill

Why does protein matter? Protein in wheat flour (aka gluten) gives baked goods structure and elasticity. For chewy breads and pizza crusts, you want to use a higher protein flour. Things like cakes and pie crusts need less elasticity, making cake flour an ideal choice.

Gluten is sticky and stretchy (think of a balloon). When leavening reacts and produces gasses in your baked good, gluten creates pockets that expand around these gasses, causing your baked good to rise. More gluten and high-power leavening (yeast) will make beautiful artisan breads with lovely air pockets. Less gluten and tamer leavening (baking soda, baking powder), make smaller bubbles and smaller air pockets. With a cake, you want tiny air pockets so that your cake melts in your mouth and doesn’t fall to bits.

Why would you use cake flour over all purpose flour? Because you can. When you want to make the most beautiful and delicious cake for a special occasion, why wouldn’t you want to use special ingredients? After all, a baked good is just another way of saying “I love you.” In all seriousness, though, cake flour produces a tender, more tightly packed crumb. It can be used for so much more than cakes, as well. It makes lovely cookies, delicate pie crusts and gorgeous pastries.

Is cake flour gluten free? Nope. It’s made from wheat. Even if it has less protein than other wheat flours, it’s still got plenty of gluten.

Is Bob’s Red Mill cake flour organic? No.

Is Bob’s Red Mill cake flour enriched? Yes. Bob’s Red Mill Super-Fine Cake Flour is enriched to government standards with niacin, reduced iron, thiamin mononitrate, riboflavin and folic acid.

Is cake flour whole grain? Absolutely not.

Is there a substitute for cake flour? Yes, while it’s not perfect, you can do what so many of us have done in a pinch- make your own. For every cup of all purpose flour, replace 1/8th of the flour with cornstarch. Blend together and sift, sift, sift. Joy the Baker has some good tips here.

Some of our favorite ways to enjoy cake flour: 

And some non-cakes…

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Waffle Dippers with Orange Berry Compote - The Lemon Bowl 2

4 Quick Meal Ideas for Toddlers

by Liz Della Croce in Recipes

Toddlers have a mind of their own which can make mealtime stressful for parents and kids alike. With a few simple strategies and a bit of patience, here are a few tips for making fast, healthy and toddler-friendly meals the whole family will love.

  • 6-Cup Muffin Tin Meals: Think outside the traditional round dinner plate and try serving your next meal in a 6-cup muffin tin instead. You can fill each cup with a variety of foods including meat, whole grains, roasted vegetables, salad and more. At breakfast, try filling one tin with yogurt, a second tin with granola and the remaining four tins with their favorite fresh fruits and seeds.
  • Snacks as a Meal: Instead of the traditional meat, rice and vegetable dinner why not try a composed meal made up of your toddler’s favorite snacks? Use a bento-style plate and fill it with string cheese, hummus, whole wheat pita bread, cherry tomatoes and apple slices. Serve with a glass of milk for even more protein and vitamins. As long as you offer a variety of options, snacks can easily turn into a well-rounded meal you can feel good about serving your toddler.
  • Avoid Food Fatigue: Toddlers, like adults, get tired of eating the same foods day after day. Since they are still developing language skills it can be difficult for them to express their food boredom and as a result they often shut down and simply refuse to eat the foods they once loved. Help combat food fatigue by offering more variety.

Try swapping out the usual potatoes or pasta with a tasty whole grain like farro, bulgur or spelt. These whole grains are chewy, nutty and extremely versatile. Serve them on their own or try this Autumn Harvest Spelt Pilaf made with fresh apples and pecans.

What are your go-to fast meal ideas for toddlers or kids of any age? Leave a comment below – we would love to hear your ideas!

The Lemon Bowl Head Shot 2013Liz Della Croce is the creator and author of The Lemon Bowl, a healthy food blog. Since 2010, Liz has been creating delicious recipes using real ingredients with an emphasis on seasonality. Liz has appeared live on the TODAY Show and tapes regular cooking segments for her local NBC affiliate station. Through healthy eating and regular exercise, Liz has successfully achieved a personal weight loss milestone and has a passion for helping others reach similar goals. New in 2013, Liz launched Healthy Habits, a feature on The Lemon Bowl where her loyal readers and growing audience can find practical advice, resources and information on creating and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

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Liz Della Croce Google: Liz Della Croce
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Poppy Seed Cakes F

Getting the Whole Grain Back to School

by Jessica Fisher in Recipes

As the school year gets under way, I find my days much fuller than they were a month ago. Since I teach our six kids at home, I really have to hit the ground running. My days are full with lessons, chores, and writing projects. It can be extremely tempting to shrug off good nutrition in exchange for getting something done.

Yet, I know that it’s better to invest some time in wholesome snacks and meals for my family – and for me!

Poppy Seed Cakes | Bob's Red Mill

I know that the first cold of the season is just waiting to strike. If I limit our added sweeteners, increase our whole grains, include lots of fresh fruit and vegetables, and make ice water the more frequent option, we’ll all be healthier and happier.

Sometimes, it’s just a matter of having a plan and setting yourself up for success. Here are some ways you can easily add more whole grains into the back to school diet — for your health and for your kids’:

1. Bake up some granola.

I regularly bake up big batches of granola. Kids of all ages (husbands included) have been known to start eating it up before it’s had a chance to cool. Sometimes I can’t even get it to the container before it’s half gone.

Making homemade granola allows you the option to customize sweeteners and avoid allergens. Plus it tastes great!

Serve granola for breakfast with milk, in parfaits, or for snacking. My husband has even started taking cereal and a container of milk to work for an easy and economical lunch. You can easily pack granola and a small container of milk in the lunchbox.

2. Pop some corn.

I grew up in the age of the air popper, so it’s no surprise that my 7-year old daughter knows how to pop corn. We keep a regular supply of Bob’s White Popcorn on hand, for snacking. It’s easy to pack which makes it a fun thing to take on the road.

3. Bake with whole wheat pastry flour.

Whole Wheat Pastry Flour | Bob's Red Mill

One of my favorite baking products under the sun is whole wheat pastry flour. It offers the light texture of all-purpose flour yet it has the whole grain without tasting too wheaty.

I use whole wheat pastry flour in most of my quick breads and even in our family’s favorite apple pie. No one notices the difference, except I know they are eating a little more healthfully.

One of my recent concoctions with whole wheat pastry flour is a redo on my mom’s poppy seed cake. I found it years ago on an index card in her recipe box. The original was a bit more complicated with beaten eggs whites and shortening. I tweaked to make it simpler and healthier.

My kids and husband give it rave reviews. I bake it in muffin papers, like a sedate cupcake, packed full of power. Already individually portioned, these cakes are perfect to take on the road or to brownbag.

Poppy Seed Cakes | Bob's Red Mill

Whole Wheat Poppy Seed Cakes

  • 1-1/4 cup Milk
  • 1/4 cup Poppy Seeds
  • 1 cup Demerara Sugar
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1/2 cup Sunflower Oil
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla
  • 2 cups Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 1 tablespoon Baking Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt

1. Preheat the oven to 350 °. Line 18 muffin cups with paper liners.
2. In a large mixing bowl combine the milk and poppy seeds. Allow the seeds to soak for about five minutes.
3. Add the sugar, eggs, oil, and vanilla. Whisk until smooth.
4. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt. Whisk again until smooth.
5. Divide the batter among the prepared pans, just a tad less than 1/4 cup batter to each muffin cup. Bake for 20 to 25 minute or until a tester inserted comes out with a few crumbs attached. Cool on a rack.

Jessica Fisher Color by Sharon Leppellere - smJessica Fisher is a mom of six children, aged 5 to 16. Homeschool mom by day, writer and blogger by night, she writes two blogs, LifeasMom and GoodCheapEats. She is the author of Not Your Mother’s Make-Ahead and FreezeOrganizing Life as MOM, and Best 100 Juices for Kids. Keep up with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill

Step by Step: 7 Grain Crepes

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Talk about a dish that intimidates me! I’ve never made crepes because they make me nervous, but I do like to eat them. With this easy step-by-step guide from our test kitchen, I might just have to give them a go so I can enjoy crepes in the comfort of my own kitchen (and pjs). I love that this recipe uses one of our whole grain pancake mixes, making me feel just a little less guilty about the indulgence.

Crepes, like many of the other recipes we’ve been sharing lately, can be sweet or savory. Fill sweet crepes with jam, fresh fruit, nutella, almond butter or just a simple butter and powdered sugar combination. Fill savory crepes with combinations of sauteed mushrooms, spinach, goat cheese, scrambled eggs and crumbled bacon.  The possibilities are endless. For a gluten free version, try these Quinoa Flour Crepes.

7 Grain Crepes (step-by-step)

Contributed by:  Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill

  •  ¾ cup Bob’s Red Mill Organic 7 Grain Pancake Mix
  • 4 Eggs
  • 1 cup Milk

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill

Whisk all ingredients together in a bowl.

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill
Let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Heat an 8 – 10-inch crepe pan or non-stick or cast iron skillet over medium heat.

­­­­­Lightly butter or oil the pan.

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill
Using ¼ cup of batter per crepe, pour one serving into the hot pan and immediately begin to tilt the pan and swirl the batter to evenly coat the base.

Crepes-7
Let cook until set, about 1 – 2 minutes.  The edges should easily release, indicating the crepe is ready to flip.

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill
Using a thin spatula, tongs, or carefully using your fingers, flip the crepe over and continue to cook until lightly browned, about 1 minute.

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill
Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill
Turn the cooked crepe out onto a rack to cool while preparing the remaining crepes (repeat steps 2 – 4) or keep warm in a 200°F oven.

Step By Step Crepes | Bob's Red Mill
Spread with filling(s) of your choice and roll or fold into a wedge to serve.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Abeleskivers F

Step by Step Aebleskivers

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Aebleskivers are a delightful, Danish confection that marries the texture of a pancake with the airiness of a popover. Typically aebleskivers are filled with apples or other delights, but many recipes in the United States are simply puffs of sweet dough. Aebleskivers require a special pan which may be hard to come by locally, but many online retailers offer them if your hunt proves fruitless. This recipe uses our Buttermilk Pancake Mix, but you can make these from scratch, as well. 

Aebleskivers – Step by Step

Contributed by:  Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

Ingredients

Directions

1. Separate yolks and whites into two separate bowls.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

2. In a medium bowl, whisk yolks until thick and pale yellow.

 

3. Whisk 2 Tbsp melted butter into yolks.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill
4. Whisk water into yolks.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

5. Whisk Bob’s Red Mill Buttermilk Pancake Mix into yolks.  Set aside.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill
6. In a separate bowl with a clean whisk, whisk whites until stiff but not dry.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill
7. With a rubber spatula, mix a dollop of stiff egg whites into the yolk mixture to lighten the mix.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill
8. Fold the remaining stiff whites into the yolk mixture with the rubber spatula.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill
9. Preheat aebleskiver pan according to the manufacturer instructions or over medium heat.

10. Brush each aebleskiver cup with melted butter.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

11. Fill each cup ¾ full with batter.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

12. Cook until bubbly and set around the edges, about 1 ½ minutes.

13. Turn over each aebleskiver using a fork or toothpick.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

14. Continue to cook on the second side until browned and a tester inserted into the center comes out clean, about 1 minute.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill
15. Remove from aebleskiver pan and dust with powdered sugar to serve.

Step by Step Aebleskivers | Bob's Red Mill

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Puff Pastry F

Step-by-Step Gluten Free Puff Pastry

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

When we developed our Gluten Free Pie Crust Mix, gluten free puff pastry was a distant ship on the horizon. We knew it was possible, but had to chart our course, if you will. You see, you can’t just go buy gluten free puff pastry dough. That hasn’t stopped us from wanting to work with one, though. Puff pastry is a fun and delicious ingredient full of many possibilities. Our recipe expert, Sarah House, worked diligently for months before she came up with this version using our gluten free pie crust mix. We’re not going to beat around the bush here, this is time consuming. It is not, however, hard. It just takes a little patience and commitment. We promise, it’s worth it. This pastry comes out flaky, light and oh-so-buttery. Simply use the pastry as called for in your favorite recipes and create fanciful gluten free desserts and decadent appetizers.

Step By Step Gluten Free Puff Pastry | Bob's Red Mill

Gluten Free Puff Pastry

Contributed by:  Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen

Prep Time: 60 minutes | Rest Time:  20 hours | Yield: approx. 36 oz

Ingredients

1. Cube 4 oz of cold butter and place in a large bowl with Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Pie Crust Mix.

2. Using a pastry blender or two knives, cut in butter until the mixture is the consistency of coarse cornmeal.

Puff Pastry Step 2
3. Add ice water as needed until the mixture forms a consistent and well-hydrated dough.

4. Form dough into a rectangle and wrap well in plastic wrap.  Chill at least 4 hours or overnight.

Puff Pastry Step 4

5. Meanwhile, shape the remaining 8 oz of butter into a wide, flat rectangle (about 5×8-inches).

Puff Pastry Step 5

6. Wrap in parchment paper, then tightly in plastic wrap and chill for at least 4 hours or overnight.

7. Remove dough and butter block from the refrigerator and let sit at room temperature until butter is just soft enough that a fingertip can make a dent in it with moderate pressure.

8. Roll the unwrapped dough between two pieces of plastic wrap or parchment paper to a square twice the size of the butter block.

Puff Pastry Step 8

9. Remove the top layer of plastic or parchment from the dough and unwrap the butter block.  Place the butter block in the center of the dough square.

Puff Pastry Step 9

10. Fold the top and bottom edges of the dough over the butter, then fold in the sides.

Puff Pastry Step 1011. Place the butter-filled dough in between two clean pieces of plastic wrap or parchment paper.

Puff Pastry Step 11

12. Roll the dough into a long rectangle about 10 x 16-inches.

13. Remove the top layer of plastic wrap or parchment paper.  Using the bottom layer of plastic wrap or parchment to assist in moving the dough, fold the bottom third of the dough up towards the center.

Puff Pastry Step 13

14. Fold the top third of the dough down to meet the bottom of the first fold.  This is one complete “fold.”

Puff Pastry Step 1415. Roll the dough into a long rectangle about 10 x 16-inches.  Repeat a second fold, wrap the dough securely in plastic wrap and chill at least 4 hours.  Two folds have now been completed.  Repeat the double-folds three more times for a total of 8 folds, making sure to chill for at least 4 hours between each double-fold.

Puff Pastry Step 1516. The gluten free puff pastry is now ready to use.  Follow a specific recipe’s instructions for precise shaping and baking instructions.

Puff Pastry Step 16

 

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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5 Whole Grain Dishes to Step Up Your Potluck Game

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Memorial Day seems to be the official opening day of barbecue and picnic season. What’s better than bringing together those you love over some delicious food? And what’s more fun than serving something that shows off your culinary chops? Sure, potato salad and pasta salad are perennial favorites and not overly difficult to put together. Wouldn’t it be more satisfying to bring a dish that isn’t filled with empty carbs and mayonnaise that everyone raves about? Health benefits aside, you know you will likely be the only person who brought something remarkable and different. Here are a few whole grain swaps you can make to step up your potluck game.

1. Instead of potato salad, bring Warm Kamut® Berry Salad with Bacon, Brussels Sprouts and Gorgonzola. Sure, this salad is a little time-consuming to make, but so is potato salad (unless you’re opting for a prepared version). Gorgonzola and bacon bring their A-game in this dish, while whole grain kamut berries and Brussels sprouts team up for a well-rounded dish that everyone will enjoy. If you can’t keep it hot, don’t worry, warm will be lovely and you won’t have to worry about any mayonnaise turning. If you can’t find kamut berries, wheat berries and farro will both make a comparable replacement.Warm Kamut Berry Salad with Bacon Brussels Sprouts and Gorgonzola

2. Swap a antipasto salad for Vegetable Bounty Quinoa Salad with Asian Vinaigrette. Far more nutritious than pasta, quinoa packs a nutritional punch and the flavors in this salad are warm and bright, perfect for pairing for a spring gathering.

Vegetable Bounty Sm

3.  Trade a pasta salad dressed with mayonnaise for this Curried Carrot and Sorghum Salad. The creamy curry dressing is both gluten free and vegan, making it perfect for any gathering and will quickly put mayo out of mind.

Curried Carrots and Sorghum Salad

4. Sure, a green salad is a great way to go, but wouldn’t it be more fun to bring Tabbouleh? Filled with fresh tomatoes and seasoned with mint and parsley, Tabbouleh comes together quickly and delivers a light, fresh flavor perfect to pair with grilled chicken or fish.

Tabbouleh

5. Keep it fresh and light with this Millet Spring Roll Salad. Who cares what you swap for this one? The bright flavors of this dish will counterbalance other, heavier fare and you’ll be able to school people on what millet is and impress them with your culinary prowess. Who has the time to make real spring rolls when you can turn them into a delicious salad?

Millet Spring Roll Salad

 

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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