Discover Millet

Discover Millet

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

Let me start by saying that millet is one of my favorite grains. In fact, it’s one of my favorite Bob’s Red Mill products. We see it most often in birdseed blends, but it’s been popular across Asia for thousands of years. Millet was revered as one of five sacred crops in ancient China and was first farmed 10,000 years ago. Millet is mentioned in the Old Testament, the writings of Herodotus, and the journals of Marco Polo. Clearly, I’m not alone in my love of millet.

Millet has a mild, sweet flavor and quick cooking time, making it a tasty, convenient, whole grain addition to any meal of the day. Unlike most other grains, this versatile, gluten free grain is alkaline, which makes it easy to digest and helps balance the body’s natural tendency towards acidity. Millet is an excellent source of dietary fiber and a great solution for those looking to add more fiber to their diet. Discover Millet

Enjoy whole grain millet as a unique alternative to rice in salads and stir-fries. Cook millet for a sweet breakfast porridge or add uncooked millet to breads for a crunchy texture. Serve millet with a drizzle of olive oil, and a dash of salt and pepper in place of mashed potatoes for a delightful side that will enhance any meal.

The light flavor of millet allows it to be sweet or savory, which means the possibilities are endless! Luckily, we have developed some delicious recipes for millet to help get you started. Millet Spring Roll Salad combines all of the wonderful flavors of spring rolls without the effort of making them! Whip up these Spinach and Lemon Millet Arancini for your next party and bask in the praise for your culinary prowess. Serve these Millet Burgers with Olives, Sun-Dried Tomato and Pecorino from Grain Mains for your next Meatless Monday to the delight of your family.

Sarah House shows you how to make perfect millet in the video below. Cheers!

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Teff Grain

Discover Teff

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

Have you heard of Teff yet? It’s the next big thing, I’m certain of it. Teff is quite possibly the world’s smallest grain (about 100 grains are the size of a kernel of wheat!). Teff originates in Africa and has been a staple of traditional Ethiopian cooking for thousands of years. Whole Grain Teff (Tef, T’ef) an ancient North African cereal grass, is a nutritional powerhouse. The germ and bran, where the nutrients are concentrated, account for a larger volume of the seed compared to more familiar grains.

Discover Teff

With a mild, nutty flavor and lots of calcium, protein and fiber, whole grain teff is a great addition to porridge, stews, pilaf or baked goods. Cooked whole grain teff makes a unique hot breakfast cereal similar in consistency and texture to wheat farina. Teff can be made into polenta, added to veggie burgers, cakes, cookies and breads. Naturally gluten free, teff is a wonderful way to mix up your menu with something a bit exotic.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Jowar/Sorghum Grains

Discover Sorghum

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

Sorghum? Isn’t that what they make syrup from? Well, yes and no. Yes, they do make syrup/molasses from a variety of sorghum. That is not the same variety as the one we mill into flour and are now offering as a whole grain. Sorghum is a wonderfully chewy whole grain that is also known as milo or jowari in different parts of the world.

Sorghum originated in Africa thousands of years ago, and then spread through the Middle East and Asia via ancient trade routes, traveling to the Arabian Peninsula, India and China along the Silk Road. Today sorghum remains a staple food in India and Africa, yet it is still relatively unknown in many parts of the world.

Discover Sorghum

This gluten free grain is an excellent source of dietary fiber and a wonderful way to include the health benefits of whole grains in a gluten free diet. Unlike some gluten free grains, the hearty, chewy texture of whole grain sorghum is very similar to wheat berries, making it an ideal addition to pilafs and cold salads. Replace the noodles or white rice in soups with sorghum for a more nutritious alternative. Sorghum has a relatively mild flavor, but adds a gentle earthiness to dishes.

Surprise and delight your friends and family by serving popped sorghum instead of popcorn at your next gathering. Sorghum is easy to pop in the microwave or on the stove top and makes a fun conversation piece for movie night.

Whether you pop it or eat it as a whole grain, sorghum has a wonderful nutritional profile and is a perfect addition to your diet. In the video below, Sarah shows you how to make perfectly cooked sorghum grain. We’ll show you how to make perfect popped sorghum next week, but if you just can’t stand it, check out the video here.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Bob Feature

Perfect Steel Cut Oats

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

Bob tells us all about steel cut oats and shows us how to magically make more time in the day.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Coconut Flour

A Little More About Coconut Flour {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

What in Bob’s Red Mill Is Coconut Flour?

Do you ever hear some people talk about different kinds of flour, new seeds, or see a word on a menu that you have no idea what it really is? Sometimes when I walk into the “natural foods” section of the grocery store, I see things that look pretty cool, but sometimes just keep walking because I’m not sure what they are or how I’m supposed to use them. I just wonder “What in the world is that? And how am I supposed to use it?” When I heard about coconut flour, that was exactly how I felt, except for this time, with Bob’s help, I have done some research, experimented with some recipes, and feel like I know a little more about coconut flour. Hopefully I can share what I’ve learned with you so that you can add it to your shopping list and add a little healthy touch of coconut to your family’s diet instead of walking on by.Coconut Flour

What is coconut flour?

Coconut flour is a soft, flour like product made from the pulp of a coconut. It’s actually a by-product made during the coconut milk making process. When making coconut milk, you have to soak coconut meat. That pulp is then dried out and ground into this powdery flour.

What are the health benefits of coconut flour?

Many people look to coconut flour to help create gluten free baked goods. Gluten free is definitely a great reason to use coconut flour, but that’s not all it has to offer. Coconut flour is also extremely high in fiber with almost double the amount found in wheat bran. In just 2 tablespoons of coconut flour, there are 5 grams of fiber (20% of the recommended daily value) and 8 grams of carbs. Mayo Clinic says a diet with plenty of fiber can help keep you regular, help maintain weight, and lower your risk of diabetes and heart disease.

How do you cook with coconut flour?

Cooking with coconut flour can be a little tricky. I have had a couple of recipes completely bomb. Once you get the hang of it though, it’s a super easy way to add nutrients and fiber to a ton of dishes. There are two things to keep in mind when working with coconut flour. Since it is so high in fiber, it requires a ton more moisture. There is also no equal substitution when working with coconut flour. You can usually substitute about 20% of the flour in a recipe for coconut flour and add at least 20% more liquid. My personal experience also says that when working with baked goods, you should also add about 3-5 eggs for every cup of coconut flour you are using. You can also add a tablespoon or two of coconut flour to sauces and gravies. It is a little clumpy so take your time when adding it in. Coconut flour has a naturally sweet flavor that can really add a nice little something extra to dishes.

Honestly, when you’re beginning to bring coconut flour into your cooking, stick to already established recipes. Once you start to get a little more comfortable, you can begin to experiment. I speak from experience… botched recipes can be costly and a little disheartening. Practice with some great recipes online first. You can even check out my first great coconut flour recipe success: Whole Wheat Coconut Blueberry Muffins.

Resources for More on Coconut Flour

–          Mayo Clinic article on benefits of high fiber diet

–          Nourished Kitchen: A great blog with tips on baking with coconut flour

–          Livestrong article on the benefits of coconut flour

–          Bob’s Red Mill coconut flour facts

–          Bob’s Red Mill Hangout on Google+: Tips for Baking with Coconut Flour

About Ashley – Ashley is a mom, wife, sister, daughter, and friend working to navigate through the mysterious world of Mommyia. Read more about her adventures at Momicles and follow her @Momicles2010.

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Bread Starters: Sour

Bread Starters Part Three: Natural Cultures

by Sarah House in Featured Articles, Recipes

We’ve prefermented.  We’ve baked.  We understand the basic concepts of yeast fermentation!  Now, it’s time for the grand poobah – natural cultures.

Natural cultures have unlimited life (you can keep them alive for practically forever with proper feedings).  You need only flour and water.  The only yeast used is that which is found in the surrounding environment.  It takes about a week to grow a starter and after that, it’s good to go!

There are several names for starters: sourdough, sour, levain, mother, chef, seed, etc., but they are all essentially the same thing.  Hydration amounts may differ but growing, sustaining and using starters follow the same steps.  Below is a recipe for building Bob’s Red Mill Basic Loose Wheat Sour.

Bread Starters: Sour

Building Your Sour

_____ Day 1  

Unbleached White Flour         3 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1 oz

Water (85°F)                           4 oz

Mix until combined in a large bowl; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.  *Use a clean non-reactive metal or glass bowl.  Only use plastic if it is clean and free of other odors.

_____ Day 2

Mix well and scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *This should look bubbly and smell “ripe”.  Discard if there is ever mold in the sour.

_____ Day 3

Unbleached White Flour         3 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1 oz

Water (85°F)                           4 oz

Sour                                         4 oz

Discard remaining 4 oz of sour (or give out to friends so they can grow their own).  Add flours and water and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *There will be quite a bit of waste when building a sour.  Unfortunately, this is necessary so the sour does not get too large to easily maintain or use.

_____ Day 4

Unbleached White Flour         2.25oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 .75 oz

Water (85°F)                           3 oz

Sour                                         6 oz

Discard remaining 6 oz of sour.  Add flours and water and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ Day 5

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 9 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *Cooler water is used from now on to slow down fermentation and build flavor and acidity.

_____ Day 6

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 12 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ Day 7

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 12 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

It is now time to decide if you want to use your sour within 24 hours or if it will be time to begin maintenance and storage.  If you are going to store your sour for use at a later date, decide if you want to store it at room temperature with daily feedings or in the refrigerator with monthly feedings.

Maintaining Your Sour   *Feedings eliminate over-fermentation (which occurs when yeast consumes all available food leaving it unable to leaven).

At room temperature

_____ Day 8 and on…

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Discard remaining sour as often as needed – always keep at least 8 oz of sour.  Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit a room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

In the refrigerator

_____ Day 8 and then once a week every three weeks…

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Discard remaining sour as often as needed – always keep at least 8 oz of sour.  Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover loosely with a lid and store in the refrigerator.  Feed the same ratio every three weeks.

Now you’ve built your healthy starter and you know how to keep it alive with regular feedings.  But what’s the point of all this work if you never get to enjoy the fruits of your labors?  Let your starter reach its full potential.  Let’s bake some bread!

  You

Yeah!  Oh, wait, hold up.  This starter has been stored in my fridge for the last two weeks.

 Me

Ooooh, um….

You

Are you trying to tell me I can’t just whip up a loaf of bread?

Me

Yes, that is exactly what I am saying.

You

Me

You need to wake it up a bit.  Give it some energy so it can make a great loaf of bread.  You just need to plan ahead a little.

That’s right folks, using a natural culture starter requires some planning.  At least 24 hours if it’s stored at room temperature but, if you store your starter in the fridge, you need to give it four days to gain enough strength to leaven a loaf of bread.  Starters are easy to grow and maintain but if you are not so adept at planning, this aspect may be a drawback.

Using Your Sour  *Plan ahead!

If you are storing your sour at room temperature, make sure to feed it 18 – 24 hours before you plan to bake.  If you are storing your sour in the refrigerator, remove at least half the amount you will be using from the refrigerator four days before baking.  Let it sit at room temperature for 24 hours then begin feeding it for three days before baking.

From here on out, we’ll be referring to ratios and parts.  1 part sour will be the amount of sour you will be starting with (if you follow the instructions below, it will be half the amount you will need for the final bread recipe).  Let’s say your recipe call for 8 oz of starter.  Begin with 4 oz; that will equal 1 part.  Therefore, 2 parts water will be 8 oz, 0.5 parts whole wheat flour will be 2 oz and 1.5 parts unbleached white flour will be 6 oz.  Got it?

At room temperature

_____ 1 Day Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Remove at least half the amount of sour you will need.  In a large bowl, mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

In the refrigerator

_____ 4 Days Before Baking

Remove at least half the amount of sour you will need.  Place it in a large clean ceramic, glass or metal bowl.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 3 Days Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 2 Days Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 1 Day Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

Bread Starters: Sour

That’s what I call a sour!

Baking Day!

Measure the amount of sour you need and follow your recipe as directed.

See?  Refreshing your starter is relatively painless!  And now you have a luscious, fragrant, deeply-flavored loaf of bread.  Totally worth it.

Can I make a gluten free starter?  Yes, just use gluten free flours and remember to include binder gums in the final bread dough.

Can I change of the flavor of my starter?  Yes, beer, buttermilk, yogurt, and fruit juice all provide new and unique flavors.

Will my bread really be that much better using a starter?  Yes.  Go ahead, make a loaf with starter and one without.  You’ll see.  I dare you.

Oh, and if you’re going out of town for awhile, you can always take your starter to the Sourdough Hotel.

Happy Baking!

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Sarah House Google: Sarah House
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CookingClasses1

May Cooking Classes at Bob’s Red Mill

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Get inspired at The Bob’s Red Mill Cooking School!  We have three wonderful classes that will nurture your family and inspire you in the kitchen. Call now to register and reserve your spot: 503-654-3215 x 208. Classes are held at our Whole Grain Store in Milwaukie, Oregon.

Bob’s Red Mill Whole Grain Store
5000 SE International Way
Milwaukie OR 97222
503-607-6455
Directions

Mother’s Day High Tea with Dan Brophy!
Thursday, May 9, 2013
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Class fee $50.00**

Do you have a granola-eating granny? What better way to celebrate Mother’s Day than with a Whole Grain High Tea? With Chef Dan Brophy you’ll want to sample and sip with other like-minded whole grainophiles. (Don’t bother checking the dictionary for that word!).  Recipes will be provided for such delights as; Mushroom Caps Stuffed with Quinoa, Whole Grain Banana Bread with Cream Cheese Filling, Finger Sandwiches on Whole Grain and Rye Bread, Smoked Salmon Pinwheels, Polenta with Tomato Tapenade, Whole Grain Shortcake, Oatcakes and Whole Grain Tart Shells with a variety of dessert fillings. Celebrate your “Mum” while enjoying a wonderful array of tasty treats!

Supplies to Bring: enjoy the sampling!

**A special rate of 2 for $80 will be offered for those who register with their mothers or those who are mother figures!

May Cooking Classes at Bob's Red Mill

Get Ready To Throw A Pizza Party with Alan Maniscalco!
Thursday, May 23, 2013
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Class fee $50.00

Alan Maniscalco, Chef at Ken’s Artisan Pizza, will show you how to make a pizza that will impress even your toughest critics.  We’ll start with a Pizza Margherita, and then learn a spicy twist on this classic using a dough made from a whole grain starter (Spicy Margherita).  The class will focus on a versatile Whole Wheat Dough, topped with broccoli raab, sausage and chiles, and made into a Skillet Focaccia with peppers and provolone.  Plus we’ll make a Gluten Free Potato Pizza and a take on the French Flat Bread, Pissaladiere.

Hands-0n “Taming The Tamale” with Ivy Manning!
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Class fee $60.00

Wrapped up like little presents in corn husk wrappers and filled with delicious masa, beans, chicken, and spices, tamales are a treat, but they’re also an art that takes practice. Join cookbook author and Oregonian FoodDay columnist, Chef Ivy Manning for a fun hands-on class as she shows you the secrets to perfect homemade tamales. We’ll make and sample Light Sweet Corn, Black Bean and Poblano Vegan Tamales and Rich Chicken Tamales, plus a delicious Tomatillo Sauce. Bring your apron and get ready to wrap and fold your way to delicious dinners!

Supplies to Bring: Your apron!                                        Class fee $60.00

**This class is limited to 15 students so be sure to sign up quickly!

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Prebiotics and Probiotics

Getting Gastrointestinally Groovy: Prebiotics and Probiotics

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Health, Whole Grains 101

It’s hard to miss the probiotic trend in the food industry these days. Probiotics are good bacteria that aid in the balance of our digestive tract. These microorganisms aid in digestion and support our immune system. They can help prevent intestinal upset and aid in the treatment of certain infections. In fact, if you’ve recently taken antibiotics, you’ve likely wiped out your good bacteria. Probiotics will help replenish your bacteria stash and get you back to your old self.

Prebiotics and Probiotics

These good bacteria are found in many packaged foods (everything from chocolate to protein bars to ice cream), but are naturally occurring in yogurt, kefir, kombucha, sauerkraut, miso, kimche, and tempeh, to name a few. Notice that each of these foods is a fermented product. Fermentation is the result of active bacteria growth. To cause fermentation, bacteria is introduced to the food. This bacteria converts the foods sugars to acid, gas or alcohol. When ingesting these fermented foods, you add a live organism (more like millions of live organisms) into your digestive system. These organisms work to breakdown foods in your body and out-compete the bad bacteria that make us sick.

Probiotics are awesome, but they can’t work alone. That takes us to prebiotics. Prebiotics are the food that probiotics need in order to survive and get busy in your body. It makes sense, in order to out-compete the bad bacteria and thrive, these good bacteria need some fuel. Just like you combine sugar and water with yeast to activate it in order for your dough to rise, you need some kind of sugar to get these probiotics charging.

Not all sugars are created equal, however, so don’t grab a doughnut and think you’re helping out your kombucha with some fuel. The best prebiotics are whole grains, legumes and fruit, but other foods high in fiber are also good prebiotics. Fiber is key because it is the “waste” from your food that sticks around in your digestive system. This waste product is exactly what the bacteria need to thrive. Any food without fiber won’t offer up much of use to the good fauna in your system.

Prebiotics and Probiotics

Here are some great ways to combine prebiotics and probiotics for a healthy, happy digestive system.

  • Muesli and Yogurt- the ultimate in a healthy breakfast or snack. Pick yogurt that lists either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium in the ingredient list as a live culture. Choose a plain or vanilla flavor that is low in sugar for the most nutritious choice. Muesli is unsweetened, but contains dried fruit that will add a nice sweetness to your meal. The whole grains provide the prebiotic fiber and the nuts and seeds will give you an extra omega-3 bonus.
  • Brown Rice and Tempeh- combine a whole grain brown rice with tempeh for a one-two prebiotic/probiotic punch. Add vegetables sauteed in olive oil for a heart-healthy complete meal.
  • Whole Grain Crackers with Yogurt Dressing/Dip – Replace sour cream in your favorite dressing or dip with a probiotic-packed yogurt and pair with whole grain crackers, bread or even drizzle over a whole grain salad. Try this Creamy Avocado Yogurt Dressing from Mother Thyme and these Savory Hemp Crackers for a wonderful omega-3 rich snack.

 

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Garbanzo Fava Bean Flour

National Flour Month: Bean Flour Primer

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

This is our fourth and final post in our series on the different flours we produce. Week one was wheat flours, week two was low carb flours and week three was gluten free flours.

millstone

Beans. Some people love them, some people detest them. We happen to be quite fond of legumes around here and have a variety of different bean flours. Our bean flours are milled from dried whole beans and are high in protein and fiber, adding a boost of nutrition to baked goods. Naturally gluten free, bean flours are often used in gluten free recipes, although some people do not like the flavor that these flours impart. Folks are often surprised by some of these flours and are unsure how to use them.

Garbanzo Fava Bean Flour

Black Bean Flour: Milled from high quality black beans, the most obvious uses for our black bean flour is as a base for black bean soup, fillings and dips. It can also be added to breads for protein and flavor, as well as used in veggie burgers and as a healthy addition to crackers. Add a 1/4 cup in place of white flour to boost the nutritional value of your baking. We recommend sticking to savory recipes, although it would combine well with chocolate and other strong flavors. Browse recipes using black bean flour.

Fava Bean Flour: Our fava bean flour is milled from blanched fava beans. Fava beans have a distinctive flavor and is most often used in combination with garbanzo bean flour for gluten free baking. There are not many recipes for using fava bean on its own, but 1/4 cup can be added in place of white flour in almost any recipes. Again, we’d recommend savory recipes with this flour. Customers have found that toasting the flour will reduce some of the bean flavor. Find directions for toasting flour here.

Garbanzo Bean Flour: Garbanzo bean flour, also known as chickpea flour, is a wonderful ingredient for gluten free baking, as well as dishes like falafel, hummus, and socca. Wonderful in crackers, pizza crusts and breads, garbanzo bean flour also works well with strong flavors like chocolate and pumpkin. Use it for up to 25% of the flour in your baking to increase protein and fiber. Browse recipes using garbanzo bean flour.

Garbanzo Fava Bean Flour: This is a popular combination for gluten free baking and can be used for almost anything. We think it would also make a very good bean dip and a wonderful addition to veggie burgers for added protein and stability. Browse recipes using garbanzo fava bean flour.

Green Pea Flour: No one ever seems to know what to do with this flour besides make split pea soup. Yes, you can make split pea soup, but you can also use it to make all sorts of fun recipes- like these Pea, Parmesan and Rosemary Crackers or Green Pea Pancakes (serve with smoked salmon and creme fraiche- try this recipe, but sub green pea flour for the garbanzo bean flour and leave out the vanilla to make savory pancakes). We were fortunate enough to try some savory crepe-like pancakes made with our pea flour and they were wonderful! Add some green pea flour to breads, cookies, cakes and muffins for a nutritional boost and create a baked good with a fun color. Use it to make a dip or use it in place of garbanzo bean flour for falafel-like patties. It’s a fun ingredient that needs some experimentation. If you make something with it, we’d love to hear how it comes out.

Soy Flour: Our soy flour is milled from whole, raw soy beans. This flour is a great source of complete protein, as well as a good source of fiber, calcium, iron, magnesium and phosphorus. You can replace up to 30% of the flour in your recipe with soy flour. Soy flour is naturally gluten free, however we do not produce it in our gluten free facility. Baked goods made with soy flour tend to brown more quickly, so it is best to use a recipe designed for soy flour or to keep a close eye on your baking when using it. Browse recipes using soy flour.

White Bean Flour: A previously underutilized ingredient that is gaining popularity, white bean flour is a wonderful thickener for sauces and gravies, as well as a great base for dips and soups. With a very mild flavor, white bean flour is a great addition to baking and can be used in sweet and savory recipes. Use it as a healthy addition to crackers, breads, pancakes and more! Browse recipes using white bean flour.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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flour

Baking with Coconut Flour: Google Plus Hangout

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

Join us on March 27th at 12 pm (EST) for a chat about baking with coconut flour. Jeanette Chen, of Jeanette’s Healthy Living, will be discussing the ins and outs of this unique flour with several top food bloggers and our very own Sarah House. Come join the fun and ask questions (we’re also giving away some fun prizes)!

RSVP and get event info here.

If you’re not on Google Plus, it’s very easy to sign up- all you need is a Google account. If you can’t make it, we’ll post the complete hangout video after the chat.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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