brm 3

Cooking Whole Grains in Your Sleep {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

Not everyone—in fact, few—may think about whole grains as nostalgic comfort food, but I do. I grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area with parents who loved to cook delicious, all natural meals with ingredients from our local Co-op and garden, and whole grains featured prominently in our family meals.

While I thought we were simply eating delicious dishes, Mom and Dad had ulterior motives, namely, making sure that my brother and sister and I had all of the strength and energy we needed to fuel us through our various sports, school and extracurricular activities. Hearty grains—in breads, cereals, salads, soups and more—laid the perfect foundation for the stamina we needed.

Now, as a busy working mother, endurance athlete, fitness instructor, and cookbook author, I need more strength and endurance than ever, and my favorite comfort grains continue to serve me well. Whether it’s steel cut oats, millet, bulgur, quinoa or amaranth, whole grains contain the fiber, minerals, phytonutrients and vitamins I need for maximizing my speed and endurance, stabilizing my blood sugar, and repairing my muscles after a grueling training session.

Thermos Oatmeal 2

As if that weren’t enough, my big quinoa salads and barley soups also prevent the release of the cortisol hormone, which contributes to fatigue and poor mood, bone health, athletic performance and ligament health.

The only downside (if you can call it that) to many of my favorite grains is that they can take a while to prepare. But I am happy to share my solution, one that I am certain you will use as often as I do once you try it: I make my whole grains in my sleep. Overnight. In my handy little thermos.

I wish I could claim ownership of this nifty technique, but many of my backpacker friends knew all about it long before they shared it with me. You don’t need a hiking trip or a backpack, to likewise hijack this method for preparing grains, just a well-insulated thermos, some boiling water, and your favorite grains.

Thermos Oatmeal

It’s as easy as this:

Step 1: Place your favorite Bob’s Red Mill dry grains into a thermos with a tight-fitting lid (preferably vacuum seal). About 1/4 cup to 1/3 cup is perfect for an individual portion.

With the exception of wheat berries and kamut (see note), you can use almost any grain you like, including farro, steel-cut oats, quinoa, amaranth, pearl barley, you name it. (Note: kamut and wheat berries will still work, but you will need to soak them overnight before using the thermos method).

Step 2: Add a pinch of salt (optional, but really brings out the flavor of the grains).

Step 3: Add boiling water to the thermos. Use the water-to-grains ratio specified on the package to determine how much to add. For example, if using 1/4 cup dry quinoa, add 1/2 cup boiling water.

Step 4: Seal the lid and swish the contents around a bit.

Step 5: Go to sleep!

Thermos Oatmeal with Goji and Chia

In the morning, unscrew the lid and enjoy your perfectly cooked grains!

I like just about any grain with a splash of milk (dairy or non-dairy) and a drizzle of maple syrup or honey, but sometimes I like to jazz things up with some dried fruit, chia seeds and nuts, too.

There’s no need to limit this method for breakfast: stir in some black beans and salsa, or leftover chicken and some jarred pesto for an instant lunch to go (already in the thermos!) Alternatively, set up your grains and boiling water (or boiling broth) in the morning and return to cooked grains after work (perfect for a salad, side dish, or stir-fry).

Enjoy! You’ll be jumping and leaping for joy with all of your added energy!

Camilla Saulsbury is a wife, mom, bestselling cookbook author, blogger, recipe developer, fitness expert and endurance athlete. Her culinary focus is translating food and flavor trends into fast, fresh, whole foods-based recipes that deliver deliciousness and energy in equal measure. Visit PowerHungry.com to read more from Camilla. 

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Discover Farro

Farro Hangout

by Cassidy Stockton in Whole Grains 101

FarroHOA2

Please join us for a Grains of Discovery Hangout series on Google Plus as we explore the trendy “new” grain Farro . Learn what it is, how to use it, and why you want this grain in your arsenal. Get some great recipes from our esteemed panelists Jean Layton (Gluten Free Doctor), Liz Della Croce (The Lemon Bowl), Dorothy Reinhold (Shockingly Delicious) and Hollie Green(Joy Foodly). Ask questions and enter to win a Grains of Discovery prize package.

Tune in at 5 pm PT on 9/18: http://goo.gl/4R93O6

Get more information, amazing recipes and enter to win a the Grains of Discovery prize package here:http://glutenfreedoctor.com/farro-grains-of-discovery-2/

Can’t make it? We’ll share a recorded version after the fact so you can still brush up on farro.

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Discover Chia

Discover Chia

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

Thousands of years ago, chia seed was a staple in the diets of ancient Mayans and Aztecs. The word chia is derived from the Mayan language, meaning “strength,” and Aztec warriors relied on chia seed to boost energy and increase stamina. Today this tiny seed is a favorite of athletes, especially distance runners, who tout it as an endurance enhancing superfood.

Chia seed contains a wealth of fiber—5 grams in just one tablespoon. It is the fiber in chia that causes chia seed to swell when combined with water, creating chia gel. Whether you eat chia gel or just the raw seeds, the hydrophilic action of chia seed will keep you full longer than many other seeds. Amazingly, chia gel can also be used as a substitute for eggs in many baked goods. Use a proportion of 1 to 6 ratio of Chia Seeds to Water to make chia gel. Use approximately one tablespoon of chia gel to replace one large egg in your baked goods.

Discover Chia

The mild, nutty flavor of chia seed goes well with both sweet and savory dishes. Use chia seed in puddings and smoothies, sprinkle on top of porridge and salads, and add to baked goods in place of flaxseed meal or poppy seeds. Try our recipe for chia fresca (video below), a refreshing drink perfect for a hot summer day in place of lemonade or use it as pre- or post-workout fuel. Looking for a fool-proof way to get chia into your diet? Make our blueberry refrigerator jam (recipe on the bag)! The gelling nature of chia makes it an ideal (and nutritious) substitute for pectin in jam. No matter the dish, you can increase the nutritional value of any meal with a sprinkle of chia seed.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Discover Millet

Discover Millet

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Whole Grains 101

Let me start by saying that millet is one of my favorite grains. In fact, it’s one of my favorite Bob’s Red Mill products. We see it most often in birdseed blends, but it’s been popular across Asia for thousands of years. Millet was revered as one of five sacred crops in ancient China and was first farmed 10,000 years ago. Millet is mentioned in the Old Testament, the writings of Herodotus, and the journals of Marco Polo. Clearly, I’m not alone in my love of millet.

Millet has a mild, sweet flavor and quick cooking time, making it a tasty, convenient, whole grain addition to any meal of the day. Unlike most other grains, this versatile, gluten free grain is alkaline, which makes it easy to digest and helps balance the body’s natural tendency towards acidity. Millet is an excellent source of dietary fiber and a great solution for those looking to add more fiber to their diet. Discover Millet

Enjoy whole grain millet as a unique alternative to rice in salads and stir-fries. Cook millet for a sweet breakfast porridge or add uncooked millet to breads for a crunchy texture. Serve millet with a drizzle of olive oil, and a dash of salt and pepper in place of mashed potatoes for a delightful side that will enhance any meal.

The light flavor of millet allows it to be sweet or savory, which means the possibilities are endless! Luckily, we have developed some delicious recipes for millet to help get you started. Millet Spring Roll Salad combines all of the wonderful flavors of spring rolls without the effort of making them! Whip up these Spinach and Lemon Millet Arancini for your next party and bask in the praise for your culinary prowess. Serve these Millet Burgers with Olives, Sun-Dried Tomato and Pecorino from Grain Mains for your next Meatless Monday to the delight of your family.

Sarah House shows you how to make perfect millet in the video below. Cheers!

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Teff Grain

Discover Teff

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

Have you heard of Teff yet? It’s the next big thing, I’m certain of it. Teff is quite possibly the world’s smallest grain (about 100 grains are the size of a kernel of wheat!). Teff originates in Africa and has been a staple of traditional Ethiopian cooking for thousands of years. Whole Grain Teff (Tef, T’ef) an ancient North African cereal grass, is a nutritional powerhouse. The germ and bran, where the nutrients are concentrated, account for a larger volume of the seed compared to more familiar grains.

Discover Teff

With a mild, nutty flavor and lots of calcium, protein and fiber, whole grain teff is a great addition to porridge, stews, pilaf or baked goods. Cooked whole grain teff makes a unique hot breakfast cereal similar in consistency and texture to wheat farina. Teff can be made into polenta, added to veggie burgers, cakes, cookies and breads. Naturally gluten free, teff is a wonderful way to mix up your menu with something a bit exotic.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Jowar/Sorghum Grains

Discover Sorghum

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

Sorghum? Isn’t that what they make syrup from? Well, yes and no. Yes, they do make syrup/molasses from a variety of sorghum. That is not the same variety as the one we mill into flour and are now offering as a whole grain. Sorghum is a wonderfully chewy whole grain that is also known as milo or jowari in different parts of the world.

Sorghum originated in Africa thousands of years ago, and then spread through the Middle East and Asia via ancient trade routes, traveling to the Arabian Peninsula, India and China along the Silk Road. Today sorghum remains a staple food in India and Africa, yet it is still relatively unknown in many parts of the world.

Discover Sorghum

This gluten free grain is an excellent source of dietary fiber and a wonderful way to include the health benefits of whole grains in a gluten free diet. Unlike some gluten free grains, the hearty, chewy texture of whole grain sorghum is very similar to wheat berries, making it an ideal addition to pilafs and cold salads. Replace the noodles or white rice in soups with sorghum for a more nutritious alternative. Sorghum has a relatively mild flavor, but adds a gentle earthiness to dishes.

Surprise and delight your friends and family by serving popped sorghum instead of popcorn at your next gathering. Sorghum is easy to pop in the microwave or on the stove top and makes a fun conversation piece for movie night.

Whether you pop it or eat it as a whole grain, sorghum has a wonderful nutritional profile and is a perfect addition to your diet. In the video below, Sarah shows you how to make perfectly cooked sorghum grain. We’ll show you how to make perfect popped sorghum next week, but if you just can’t stand it, check out the video here.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Bob Feature

Perfect Steel Cut Oats

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

Bob tells us all about steel cut oats and shows us how to magically make more time in the day.

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Coconut Flour

A Little More About Coconut Flour {Guest Post}

by Guest in Featured Articles, Whole Grains 101

What in Bob’s Red Mill Is Coconut Flour?

Do you ever hear some people talk about different kinds of flour, new seeds, or see a word on a menu that you have no idea what it really is? Sometimes when I walk into the “natural foods” section of the grocery store, I see things that look pretty cool, but sometimes just keep walking because I’m not sure what they are or how I’m supposed to use them. I just wonder “What in the world is that? And how am I supposed to use it?” When I heard about coconut flour, that was exactly how I felt, except for this time, with Bob’s help, I have done some research, experimented with some recipes, and feel like I know a little more about coconut flour. Hopefully I can share what I’ve learned with you so that you can add it to your shopping list and add a little healthy touch of coconut to your family’s diet instead of walking on by.Coconut Flour

What is coconut flour?

Coconut flour is a soft, flour like product made from the pulp of a coconut. It’s actually a by-product made during the coconut milk making process. When making coconut milk, you have to soak coconut meat. That pulp is then dried out and ground into this powdery flour.

What are the health benefits of coconut flour?

Many people look to coconut flour to help create gluten free baked goods. Gluten free is definitely a great reason to use coconut flour, but that’s not all it has to offer. Coconut flour is also extremely high in fiber with almost double the amount found in wheat bran. In just 2 tablespoons of coconut flour, there are 5 grams of fiber (20% of the recommended daily value) and 8 grams of carbs. Mayo Clinic says a diet with plenty of fiber can help keep you regular, help maintain weight, and lower your risk of diabetes and heart disease.

How do you cook with coconut flour?

Cooking with coconut flour can be a little tricky. I have had a couple of recipes completely bomb. Once you get the hang of it though, it’s a super easy way to add nutrients and fiber to a ton of dishes. There are two things to keep in mind when working with coconut flour. Since it is so high in fiber, it requires a ton more moisture. There is also no equal substitution when working with coconut flour. You can usually substitute about 20% of the flour in a recipe for coconut flour and add at least 20% more liquid. My personal experience also says that when working with baked goods, you should also add about 3-5 eggs for every cup of coconut flour you are using. You can also add a tablespoon or two of coconut flour to sauces and gravies. It is a little clumpy so take your time when adding it in. Coconut flour has a naturally sweet flavor that can really add a nice little something extra to dishes.

Honestly, when you’re beginning to bring coconut flour into your cooking, stick to already established recipes. Once you start to get a little more comfortable, you can begin to experiment. I speak from experience… botched recipes can be costly and a little disheartening. Practice with some great recipes online first. You can even check out my first great coconut flour recipe success: Whole Wheat Coconut Blueberry Muffins.

Resources for More on Coconut Flour

–          Mayo Clinic article on benefits of high fiber diet

–          Nourished Kitchen: A great blog with tips on baking with coconut flour

–          Livestrong article on the benefits of coconut flour

–          Bob’s Red Mill coconut flour facts

–          Bob’s Red Mill Hangout on Google+: Tips for Baking with Coconut Flour

About Ashley – Ashley is a mom, wife, sister, daughter, and friend working to navigate through the mysterious world of Mommyia. Read more about her adventures at Momicles and follow her @Momicles2010.

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Bread Starters: Sour

Bread Starters Part Three: Natural Cultures

by Sarah House in Featured Articles, Recipes

We’ve prefermented.  We’ve baked.  We understand the basic concepts of yeast fermentation!  Now, it’s time for the grand poobah – natural cultures.

Natural cultures have unlimited life (you can keep them alive for practically forever with proper feedings).  You need only flour and water.  The only yeast used is that which is found in the surrounding environment.  It takes about a week to grow a starter and after that, it’s good to go!

There are several names for starters: sourdough, sour, levain, mother, chef, seed, etc., but they are all essentially the same thing.  Hydration amounts may differ but growing, sustaining and using starters follow the same steps.  Below is a recipe for building Bob’s Red Mill Basic Loose Wheat Sour.

Bread Starters: Sour

Building Your Sour

_____ Day 1  

Unbleached White Flour         3 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1 oz

Water (85°F)                           4 oz

Mix until combined in a large bowl; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.  *Use a clean non-reactive metal or glass bowl.  Only use plastic if it is clean and free of other odors.

_____ Day 2

Mix well and scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *This should look bubbly and smell “ripe”.  Discard if there is ever mold in the sour.

_____ Day 3

Unbleached White Flour         3 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1 oz

Water (85°F)                           4 oz

Sour                                         4 oz

Discard remaining 4 oz of sour (or give out to friends so they can grow their own).  Add flours and water and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *There will be quite a bit of waste when building a sour.  Unfortunately, this is necessary so the sour does not get too large to easily maintain or use.

_____ Day 4

Unbleached White Flour         2.25oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 .75 oz

Water (85°F)                           3 oz

Sour                                         6 oz

Discard remaining 6 oz of sour.  Add flours and water and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ Day 5

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 9 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours. *Cooler water is used from now on to slow down fermentation and build flavor and acidity.

_____ Day 6

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 12 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ Day 7

Unbleached White Flour         4.5 oz

Whole Wheat Flour                 1.5 oz

Water (55°F)                           6 oz

Sour                                         3 oz

Discard remaining 12 oz of sour.  Mix water and 3 oz sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

It is now time to decide if you want to use your sour within 24 hours or if it will be time to begin maintenance and storage.  If you are going to store your sour for use at a later date, decide if you want to store it at room temperature with daily feedings or in the refrigerator with monthly feedings.

Maintaining Your Sour   *Feedings eliminate over-fermentation (which occurs when yeast consumes all available food leaving it unable to leaven).

At room temperature

_____ Day 8 and on…

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Discard remaining sour as often as needed – always keep at least 8 oz of sour.  Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit a room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

In the refrigerator

_____ Day 8 and then once a week every three weeks…

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Discard remaining sour as often as needed – always keep at least 8 oz of sour.  Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover loosely with a lid and store in the refrigerator.  Feed the same ratio every three weeks.

Now you’ve built your healthy starter and you know how to keep it alive with regular feedings.  But what’s the point of all this work if you never get to enjoy the fruits of your labors?  Let your starter reach its full potential.  Let’s bake some bread!

  You

Yeah!  Oh, wait, hold up.  This starter has been stored in my fridge for the last two weeks.

 Me

Ooooh, um….

You

Are you trying to tell me I can’t just whip up a loaf of bread?

Me

Yes, that is exactly what I am saying.

You

Me

You need to wake it up a bit.  Give it some energy so it can make a great loaf of bread.  You just need to plan ahead a little.

That’s right folks, using a natural culture starter requires some planning.  At least 24 hours if it’s stored at room temperature but, if you store your starter in the fridge, you need to give it four days to gain enough strength to leaven a loaf of bread.  Starters are easy to grow and maintain but if you are not so adept at planning, this aspect may be a drawback.

Using Your Sour  *Plan ahead!

If you are storing your sour at room temperature, make sure to feed it 18 – 24 hours before you plan to bake.  If you are storing your sour in the refrigerator, remove at least half the amount you will be using from the refrigerator four days before baking.  Let it sit at room temperature for 24 hours then begin feeding it for three days before baking.

From here on out, we’ll be referring to ratios and parts.  1 part sour will be the amount of sour you will be starting with (if you follow the instructions below, it will be half the amount you will need for the final bread recipe).  Let’s say your recipe call for 8 oz of starter.  Begin with 4 oz; that will equal 1 part.  Therefore, 2 parts water will be 8 oz, 0.5 parts whole wheat flour will be 2 oz and 1.5 parts unbleached white flour will be 6 oz.  Got it?

At room temperature

_____ 1 Day Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Remove at least half the amount of sour you will need.  In a large bowl, mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

In the refrigerator

_____ 4 Days Before Baking

Remove at least half the amount of sour you will need.  Place it in a large clean ceramic, glass or metal bowl.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 3 Days Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 2 Days Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

_____ 1 Day Before Baking

Unbleached White Flour         1.5 parts

Whole Wheat Flour                 0.5 parts

Water (55°F)                           2 parts

Sour                                         1 part

Mix water and sour until dissolved.  Add the flours and mix well; scrape down sides.  Cover with cheesecloth or a clean towel and let sit at room temperature for 18 – 24 hours.

Bread Starters: Sour

That’s what I call a sour!

Baking Day!

Measure the amount of sour you need and follow your recipe as directed.

See?  Refreshing your starter is relatively painless!  And now you have a luscious, fragrant, deeply-flavored loaf of bread.  Totally worth it.

Can I make a gluten free starter?  Yes, just use gluten free flours and remember to include binder gums in the final bread dough.

Can I change of the flavor of my starter?  Yes, beer, buttermilk, yogurt, and fruit juice all provide new and unique flavors.

Will my bread really be that much better using a starter?  Yes.  Go ahead, make a loaf with starter and one without.  You’ll see.  I dare you.

Oh, and if you’re going out of town for awhile, you can always take your starter to the Sourdough Hotel.

Happy Baking!

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CookingClasses1

May Cooking Classes at Bob’s Red Mill

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Get inspired at The Bob’s Red Mill Cooking School!  We have three wonderful classes that will nurture your family and inspire you in the kitchen. Call now to register and reserve your spot: 503-654-3215 x 208. Classes are held at our Whole Grain Store in Milwaukie, Oregon.

Bob’s Red Mill Whole Grain Store
5000 SE International Way
Milwaukie OR 97222
503-607-6455
Directions

Mother’s Day High Tea with Dan Brophy!
Thursday, May 9, 2013
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Class fee $50.00**

Do you have a granola-eating granny? What better way to celebrate Mother’s Day than with a Whole Grain High Tea? With Chef Dan Brophy you’ll want to sample and sip with other like-minded whole grainophiles. (Don’t bother checking the dictionary for that word!).  Recipes will be provided for such delights as; Mushroom Caps Stuffed with Quinoa, Whole Grain Banana Bread with Cream Cheese Filling, Finger Sandwiches on Whole Grain and Rye Bread, Smoked Salmon Pinwheels, Polenta with Tomato Tapenade, Whole Grain Shortcake, Oatcakes and Whole Grain Tart Shells with a variety of dessert fillings. Celebrate your “Mum” while enjoying a wonderful array of tasty treats!

Supplies to Bring: enjoy the sampling!

**A special rate of 2 for $80 will be offered for those who register with their mothers or those who are mother figures!

May Cooking Classes at Bob's Red Mill

Get Ready To Throw A Pizza Party with Alan Maniscalco!
Thursday, May 23, 2013
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Class fee $50.00

Alan Maniscalco, Chef at Ken’s Artisan Pizza, will show you how to make a pizza that will impress even your toughest critics.  We’ll start with a Pizza Margherita, and then learn a spicy twist on this classic using a dough made from a whole grain starter (Spicy Margherita).  The class will focus on a versatile Whole Wheat Dough, topped with broccoli raab, sausage and chiles, and made into a Skillet Focaccia with peppers and provolone.  Plus we’ll make a Gluten Free Potato Pizza and a take on the French Flat Bread, Pissaladiere.

Hands-0n “Taming The Tamale” with Ivy Manning!
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
5:00-7:00 p.m.
Class fee $60.00

Wrapped up like little presents in corn husk wrappers and filled with delicious masa, beans, chicken, and spices, tamales are a treat, but they’re also an art that takes practice. Join cookbook author and Oregonian FoodDay columnist, Chef Ivy Manning for a fun hands-on class as she shows you the secrets to perfect homemade tamales. We’ll make and sample Light Sweet Corn, Black Bean and Poblano Vegan Tamales and Rich Chicken Tamales, plus a delicious Tomatillo Sauce. Bring your apron and get ready to wrap and fold your way to delicious dinners!

Supplies to Bring: Your apron!                                        Class fee $60.00

**This class is limited to 15 students so be sure to sign up quickly!

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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