What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Buckwheat

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is it? Buckwheat is a plant related to rhubarb, with no relation, whatsoever, to wheat. Buckwheat is technically a fruit, though it is widely considered to be a grain. The dark, pyramid-shaped kernels of the buckwheat plant are harvested, then split and the pale fruit is what we know and love as buckwheat. The whole kernel (with the husk intact) can be ground into flour, which has the dark color so commonly seen in buckwheat pancakes and blini. In fact, most buckwheat flour is ground with extra husks to give it that deep, dark color.

For the longest time, I was under the impression that the name buckwheat must have come from a relationship with wheat. I knew they weren’t related, but I thought maybe it was called buckwheat because it was a replacement for wheat or that it looked like wheat when it grew. Neither of those things is true. It’s name actually comes from the seed’s similarity to the seed of the Beech tree. In fact, it was sometimes called “beech wheat” because of this similarity in the seed shape. How we got to “buckwheat” is still beyond me, but, suffice to say, it’s not because it’s related to wheat.

Buckwheat has long been a staple in Asia and eastern Europe- being used for everything from noodles in China and Japan to kasha varnishkes and blini in Russia. In the United States, we often see buckwheat in pancake form or stuffed into pillows for “the perfect night’s sleep”. Clearly, it’s versatile. It’s also supremely nutritious and wonderfully flavorful with a unique nuttiness you won’t get from any other grain.

The buckwheat plant | Bob's Red Mill
Is it gluten free? Yes, buckwheat is inherently gluten free. However, buckwheat is a crop that is often transported with trucks that carry wheat. Some of our buckwheat products display a gluten free symbol and some do not. If this is a concern for you, be sure to find our gluten free symbol on the package before consuming.

Is it whole grain? Yes, despite its taxonomy, buckwheat is considered to be a whole grain by both the Whole Grains Council and the USDA.

What makes it so nutritious? Buckwheat contains all 8 essential amino acids, classifying it as a complete protein. It is also high in fiber and delivers a healthy amount of manganese, magnesium, copper and zinc, all of which support the immune system.

What is the difference between whole buckwheat groats and kasha? Kasha is simply buckwheat groats that have been roasted. You can easily make your own kasha from raw buckwheat groats in your oven. The roasting brings out the nutty flavor of buckwheat beautifully.

What is it? Wednesday: Buckwheat | Bob's Red Mill

How do you use it? One of the best things about buckwheat is that it cooks in just 10 minutes and can be added to almost anything. It’s incredibly versatile. We’ve tried it in salads, soups and pilafs, as well as granola (recipe coming soon) and as a hot cereal. Buckwheat has a strong flavor, but don’t let that stop you. That flavor can go with sweet as easily as it can go with savory.

Recipes to inspire you:

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Thai Stir-Fried Oats | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Mondays: Thai Stir-Fried Oats

by Cassidy Stockton in Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

This recipe was inspired by a Spar for the Spurtle entry from a few years ago. Who needs white rice when you can have whole grain oats? Trust us, this is an upgrade to normal fried rice. The preparation is so easy for this dish that you’ll have a dinner on the table in less than half an hour. The only hitch is that the oats need to be soaked overnight. If you’ve forgotten this step, but still want to enjoy this exotic dish, simply cook the oats on the stove top for 3-5 minutes. Just long enough to take the edge off of the uncooked oats. This flavorful dish really doesn’t need any accouterments, but if you just can’t help yourself, these vegetable spring rolls will pair very nicely.

Thai Stir-Fried Oats | Bob's Red Mill

Thai Stir-Fried Oats

  • 1-3/4 cups Bob’s Red Mill Steel Cut Oats*
  • 2 Tbsp Vegetable Oil
  • 3 Green Onions, thinly sliced, green and white parts separated
  • 1 medium Bell Pepper, diced
  • 8 oz Shiitake or Button Mushrooms, sliced
  • 3 Tbsp Soy Sauce
  • 1-1/2 Tbsp bottled Thai Green Curry Paste
  • 2 Tbsp Brown Sugar or Date Sugar
  • 2 large Eggs, lightly beaten*
  • 1 cup fresh Pineapple, diced
  • 1/2 cup roasted, lightly salted Cashews, coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup Unsweetened Coconut Flakes
  • juice and zest of 2 medium Limes
  • 1/2 cup fresh Cilantro or Mint Leaves (or combination of both), minced, divided

Soak oats overnight in water to cover.

Drain the oats in a fine mesh sieve, pressing out excess water. Set aside.

Heat oil in a  large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Add the white parts of the green onions, bell pepper and mushrooms; stir-fry 1 minute.

Add the fish sauce, curry paste, sugar and drained oats to the skillet. Stir-fry 3 minutes.

Push oat mixture to the side of skillet and add eggs to cleared space; cook and stir until eggs are just set, then combine with oat mixture.

Add the pineapple, cashews and coconut. Stir-fry 30 seconds.

Remove from heat and stir in lime juice, lime zest, green parts of green onions and half of the herbs. Serve, sprinkled with the remaining herbs.

*To make this dish gluten free, use our gluten free steel cut oats and be sure to use a gluten free soy sauce. To make this entirely vegan, omit eggs or substitute with 1/2 cup drained, soft tofu. 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Savory Cornmeal Waffle F

10 Savory Pancake Recipes for Dinner

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Starting on Saturday, Portland is expected to stay well above 90°F for a while. When it gets that warm, I am not interested in slaving away in the kitchen over a hot stove or using the oven, but my family still needs a nutritious dinner. That’s why, this weekend,  I will be serving savory pancakes for dinner. They are so easy and versatile AND I can whip up a batch on an electric griddle without creating a sauna in my kitchen. Plus, it’s fun. Everyone likes breakfast for dinner.

10 Savory Pancake Recipes for Dinner | Bob's Red Mill

Sweet, syrup-drenched pancakes might not be the most appealing dinner for some. Here are some fabulous savory ideas to take dinner pancakes (or waffles) to the next level. You can use any pancake or waffle mix for these combinations, though we particularly like our cornmeal and buckwheat pancake mixes in savory applications. Watch the video at the end of the post to hear some of our employees’ favorite ways to enjoy pancakes.

Top your pancakes with… 

  • Sauteed greens, crisp bacon and a drizzle of maple syrup.
  • A scoop of your favorite chili, a dollop of sour cream, shredded cheddar cheese and pickled jalapenos.
  • Crumbled goat or feta cheese, sun dried tomatoes and freshly chopped basil.
  • Diced ham, sliced green onions and shredded Swiss cheese.
  • Black beans, salsa, sour cream and avocado (recipe below).
  • Applewood smoked sausage, sauteed apples and Gruyère.
  • Smoked salmon, fresh dill and cream cheese.
  • Shredded chicken or pork, warm (or grilled) pineapple chunks, caramelized onions and a drizzle of barbecue sauce.
  • Breakfast sausage, shredded cheddar and a fried egg (there’s nothing wrong with going a little classic).
  • Leftover flank steak (or almost any meat), caramelized onions, bell peppers and mushrooms, and melted provolone cheese.

Savory Cornmeal Waffle + 10 Savory Pancake Recipes for Dinner | Bob's Red Mill

Savory Cornmeal Waffles with Black Beans

Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen 

Prep Time:  15 minutes | Cook Time:  25 minutes | Yield: 4 servings

  • 2 cups Buttermilk
  • 2 Eggs
  • ¼ cup Oil
  • 2 ¼ cups Bob’s Red Mill Cornmeal Pancake Mix
  • ½ tsp ground Cumin
  • ¼ tsp Chili Powder
  • 15 oz can Black Beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup prepared Salsa
  • Sour Cream, sliced Avocado and chopped Cilantro to garnish

Step 1

Preheat a waffle iron to medium-high heat.

Step 2

Whisk together buttermilk, eggs and oil in a bowl then mix in Bob’s Red Mill Cornmeal Pancake Mix, cumin and chili powder.

Step 3

Follow manufacturer’s instructions to portion batter onto the preheated waffle iron or use about ¾ cup batter per waffle.  Cook until golden and flip over if needed, about 6 minutes total.  Keep warm in a 200°F oven.

Step 4

While waffles cook, mix together black beans and prepared salsa in a small bowl.  To serve, top each waffle with about ¼ cup black bean mixture and garnish as desired with sour cream, avocado and cilantro.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Amaranth

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is amaranth? Whether consciously or not, it’s likely you’ve seen amaranth growing in your neighborhood. This abundant plant in the pigweed family produces a stunning blossom that is hard to mistake for any other flower. There are over 60 types of amaranth found all over the world from South America to Africa to India and Greece. Several, though not all, subspecies of this weed, for it is truly a weed, produce what we know and love as amaranth grain. Ranging from white to almost black, this whole grain is a nutritional powerhouse with an earthy flavor and pleasant porridge-like texture when cooked.

Amaranth has a fascinating history. Cultivated across the world, its name comes from the Greek words for “unfading” and “flower”. The ancient Aztecs relied on amaranth as a food staple and used it in religious rituals, earning it the names “super grain of the Aztecs” and “golden grain of the gods.” In the 1500s, Spanish conquistadors attempted to outlaw amaranth in an effort to convert and control the Aztecs. Lucky for us, their efforts proved unsuccessful due to amaranth’s amazing ability to grow quickly and thrive in less-than-ideal soil, making it nearly impossible to extinguish.

What is it? Wednesday: Amaranth | Bob's Red Mill

Is it a whole grain? Yes.

Is it gluten free? Yes.

Why is it considered a nutritional powerhouse? Amaranth is a complete protein and boasts a higher protein level than quinoa. It is also high in dietary fiber, magnesium and iron.

How is it used? Amaranth is different from many of its whole grain brethren, in that it doesn’t cook up as individual grains very easily. A pot of amaranth often looks like a pot of porridge. However, if you are looking for a more individualized amaranth it can be popped or toasted before eating. Popped amaranth can be eaten as a cold cereal, sprinkled on salads for a fun topping or used as a coating (such as the mini goat cheese skewers below). Toasted amaranth is fabulous added to baked goods for a nutritious crunch. We like it used as a polenta or risotto for dinner and with sweet toppings for a breakfast porridge.

Our favorite ways to enjoy amaranth:

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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orange dijon bulgur salad F

6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

by Claire Gallam in Featured Articles, Recipes

As a food blogger and recipe developer, I’m constantly looking for the big “new” thing. Instead of chicken, I’m buying duck. In place of spaghetti noodles I’m buying soba. I’m constantly looking for a new ingredient that will turn an ordinary dish into something miraculous. And that’s exactly why I bought Bulgur.

It was a few months ago and I was shopping for a rice substitute. That’s when my eyes landed on a bag of Bob’s Red Mill Bulgur. Never having heard of it, I thought “hey, this is kind of unique and exotic. I could use this in place of rice!” I bought it and for months it sat in my cupboard. Finally, on a rainy Tuesday, I ripped open the package and cooked it with some olive oil, fresh herbs and plenty of salt and pepper. After one bite, I was hooked.  The entire bag was gone the following week.

Bob's Red Mill Bulgur

For those who haven’t heard of it (or tried it), bulgur is a wheat grain that has been cracked and partially cooked. It’s very high in fiber, low in fat and calories and is a great addition to vegan and vegetarian entrees. It’s most commonly found in tabbouleh salads, but it’s also popular in pilafs and burgers.

What I love about this grain is how versatile it is. You can sub it in for rice under your favorite stews, you can use it in place of processed noodles in spring pasta salads.  You can even use it in meatballs and meatloaf for a high fiber alternative to the typical unhealthy entrée.

Instead of just telling you all of the amazing ways to use bulgur, why not show you? I’ve rounded up 6 new, exciting and beautiful dishes highlighting this uniquely healthy grain. So what’s stopping you, get your bulgur on!

Cinnamon Banana Breakfast BulgurCinnamon Banana Breakfast Bulgur | 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Move over cream of wheat, this luscious banana bulgur is taking your place! Add a few crunchy walnuts or pecans for a healthier take on banana bread! Grab the recipe here on Tasty Kitchen. Photo by Courtney of Neighborhood Food Blog.

Bulgur Wheat Salad with Orange Mustard Dressing 

Bulgur Wheat Salad with Orange Dijon Dressing| 7 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Forget high carb & high fat pasta and toss in bulgur to your favorite side salads instead, like Gina from Running to the Kitchen did! This high fiber salad is loaded with extra protein from the edamame and has the perfect hint of citrus in the dressing. Grab the recipe on Running to the Kitchen!

Curried Bulgur Sliders

Curried Bulgur Sliders| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Now this is a recipe I could eat everyday! These little sliders use bulgur in place of beef, giving you a much lower fat and healthier slider for your summertime BBQ’s. Plus, the addition of curry gives each bite the perfect added spice. I could easily eat 10 of these, couldn’t you? Grab the recipe on Bev Cooks!

Vegan Bulgur Chili
Creamy Bulgur Chili| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

Even though the temperatures outside are hot, that’s not going to stop me from eating chili. This vegetarian rendition is made with wheat bulgur and beans and is topped with fresh summer produce like yellow tomatoes, herbs and red onion.  This would make a great Sunday night dinner (that’ll keep in the freezer for a later date too!) Grab the recipe here on Naturally Ella.

Bulgur and Spinach Pilaf

Bulgur and Spinach Pilaf| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

I don’t know what I love more with this recipe, the hearty and flavorful bulgur pilaf or the creamy caramelized onions on top! If you need a healthy potluck dish for your spring or summer parties, look no further than this pilaf. Plus it’s completely vegan for your non-dairy and meat-free friends. Grab the recipe on Joanne Eats Well With Others.

Bulgur Moroccan Salad

Bulgur Moroccan Salad| 6 Exciting New Ways to Try Bulgur

I’ve been obsessed with Morrocan flavors lately so this salad is right up my alleyway. The bulgur adds a nice pack of fiber while the creamy cilantro orange dressing gives each bite a rich, zesty flavor. This is one salad I’d never get tired of. Grab the recipe on Pinch of Yum.

Claire GallamClaire is a cookbook author, food writer and recipe creator, soon-to-be culinary student and avid world traveler. She is recently married to a social media guru who loves *almost* everything she conjures up. She writes full-time for the Food section of SheKnowsFabulousFoods.com and is a contributing writer for the Travel section of SheKnows. You can also follow her daily musings and find delicious healthy recipes on her food blog, The Realistic Nutritionist. Follow Claire on Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with her newest creations. 

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Claire Gallam Google: Claire Gallam
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apple crisp topping H

Pancake Topping Ideas

by Julia Mueller in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Hi everyone! Julia from The Roasted Root here, checking in to talk to you about topping your pancakes in the utmost delicious ways!  We all know it’s tough to beat a Saturday morning stack of pure pancake lovin’, but sometimes we get stuck in the same ol’ butter and maple syrup routine and overlook the variety of flavor, texture, and (believe it or not) nutrition that we can inject into our pancake sessions. Fret not: I’m here to help break the mold and give you healthful ideas to make your pancake endeavors that much more pleasing.

Because I eat a wheat-free diet, I have taken a personal interest in developing gluten-free pancake recipes using an assortment of Bob’s Red Mill’s gluten-free flours and nut meals. From Almond Flour Pancakes, Lemon Poppy Seed Coconut Flour Pancakes, to Brown Rice Flour Banana Pancakes, whipping up fun and inviting hot cake recipes is a big hobby of mine.Pancakes with peaches, chia seeds, and honey

But let’s talk toppings! Yes, I have been known to eat pancakes layered with fried egg and bacon. Ham and cheese? Check! All sorts of fruit, yogurt, nut, and homemade syrup concoctions? Always on board! I’ve even made chocolate syrup using coconut milk, cocoa powder, and pure maple syrup. In essence, I always enjoy coming up with new ways of serving pancakes.

Let’s face it: butter and store-bought syrup is tough to beat as a pancake topping; however, unless you buy pure maple syrup, which can be expensive, you end up using syrup that is full of artificial ingredients and cane sugar. From fresh fruit and nuts to compotes or homemade syrups, many toppings don’t require much time at all, just a little forethought. Let’s gather some ideas for our next stack of pancakes, shall we?!

Pancakes with Peanut butter and Banana

Fruit, nuts, yogurt, seeds, nut butters:

I love chopping fresh fruit and adding it to a pancake breakfast, along with raw nuts, yogurt, seeds, and/or nut butters. Peanut butter and banana will always win me over. I also love fresh mango or pineapple along with chia seeds and/or pumpkin seeds.  Taking the raw and fresh route is fast, easy, adds health benefits to your meal and helps avoid the temptation to douse a stack of pancakes with syrup.

Pancakes with Coconut Milk, Mango, Walnut

Fruit Compote:

Compote is made by heating fruit, a small amount of liquid and sweetener in a saucepan and allowing it to gently boil until it softens and becomes juicy.  For soft fruit (like berries), this process only takes about 15 minutes. For heartier fruit (such as apples and pears), the process takes about 35 to 40 minutes. I like to add a little bit of a natural sweetener, such as honey or pure maple syrup, in order to keep the compote healthful yet sweet. Mimicking apple or berry crisp using fruit compote and granola makes for such a treat, and makes you feel like you’re eating dessert for breakfast!

Pancakes with Raspberry Syrup

Homemade Syrup:

Homemade syrups are easier than you’d think! They can be made using a large variety of fresh fruit. You simply start by cooking your fruit of choice with water and sweetener (just like you would a compote), and then strain the fruit pulp in order to achieve a syrup.  You can add your desired amount of pure maple syrup or honey in order to sweeten the syrup to your liking.

In addition to a fruit-based syrup, did you know you could make thick, creamy toppings using full-fat coconut milk?  Simply heat up a can of coconut milk and allow it to boil for 40 to 50 minutes until it thickens. You can keep it simple by adding a natural sweetener and vanilla extract. For a citrus-y topping, add lemon zest, a small amount of lemon juice, and maple syrup. Also try a chocolate-y topping by mixing the coconut milk with cocoa powder, a pinch of cinnamon, and some pure maple syrup for a decadent yet healthful treat!

Pancake topping ideas from Bob's Red Mill

Topping Ideas:

  1. Plain Greek yogurt (or crème fraiche) and fresh berries
  2. Almond, peanut, or cashew butter and sliced banana
  3. Fresh chopped peaches, honey and chia seeds or pumpkin seeds
  4. Full-fat coconut milk, chopped mango, chopped walnuts
  5. Bob’s Red Mill’s Blueberry Chia Jam and chopped nuts
  6. Homemade chocolate syrup using canned coconut milk
  7. Fried egg and bacon
  8. Country-style ham and cheddar cheese
  9. Apple Crisp Topping (see recipe below!)
  10. Blueberry, blackberry, pear, or apple compote (see recipe for blueberry compote below)

What are your favorite pancake toppings?

Pancakes with apple crisp topping

Apple Crisp Topping

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Add all ingredients except for the granola to a medium-sized pot and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover, and allow the mixture to boil gently for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover, stir in ¼ to ½ cup of granola and continue to cook until most of the moisture has burned off.
  2. Add desired amount of topping to fresh-off-the-griddle pancakes.

Blueberry Compote/Syrup:

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Blueberries (fresh or frozen)
  • 3 to 4 Tbsp Water
  • 2 Tbsp Pure Maple Syrup
  • Pinch of Salt

Instructions:

  1. In a small pot, heat all of the ingredients until mixture comes to a full boil.
  2. Reduce heat, cover, and allow mixture to gently boil until blueberries are juicing out and have softened, about 15 minutes.
  3. Uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture has thickened and berries are coated with a syrupy consistency, about 5 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately on pancakes or store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week and reheat when ready to use.

JuliaMuellerJulia Mueller’s two greatest passions are food and the great outdoors. Creator of the food blog, The Roasted Root, Julia enjoys whipping up and photographing nutrient-dense recipes that are healthful yet comforting, and are approachable to make any night of the week. Most of her recipes are vegetable and meat-based, gluten-free and refined-sugar free. Julia is also the author of the cookbooks, Delicious Probiotic Drinks, and Let Them Eat Kale! An avid mountain biker and snowboarder, Julia enjoys balancing work with playing outside in the mountains. Keep up with her onFacebook and Twitter.

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Julia Mueller Google: Julia Mueller
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bakingflourheader

NEW Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Gluten Free

Do you ever just wish someone would make gluten free baking easier? That there was a simple product swap that could replace wheat flour without having to keep 5 different flours and starches on hand? That you could just take the guesswork out of how much xanthan gum to use? Good news! We are excited to say that our newest addition to our gluten free product line can do just that.

Introducing…

Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour

Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour | Bob's Red Mill

endless possibilities, one easy solution

I think all of our gluten free products are winners, but this one is my new favorite. It’s so easy to use- just swap wheat flour with this blend cup for cup and follow the original recipe as instructed. You will bake some pretty stellar baked goods and tasters will be hard pressed to tell the difference. We even did some blind taste tests around with none the wiser. That’s a pretty good test, in my opinion.

This flour combines finely ground brown rice flour, sweet white rice flour, whole grain sorghum flour, potato starch, and tapioca flour with a touch of xanthan gum—just enough xanthan gum to create chewy cookies and springy muffins. The protein in the sorghum flour helps give baked goods an almost wheat-like texture and aids in browning, for those times you need a perfectly golden brown chocolate chip cookie.

We hope you will enjoy this new product as much as we do. To celebrate our newest addition, we’re giving away a package of this blend to five lucky winners. Follow the prompts below to enter. We’ll select five winners at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 7/6/14. We’re working to get this product on shelves as soon as possible, so if you don’t see it at your local store, ask them to bring it in. In the meantime, you can grab a bag at bobsredmill.com for $4.95.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

It’s Monday again, which means it’s Meatless Monday around here. At least, for many of us, it’s a short week! In honor of the upcoming holiday, I’ve gathered together 10 of our favorite meatless dishes for the Fourth of July. Each of these will satisfy carnivores and vegetarians alike and make it easy to please everyone no matter what you’re doing on Friday. 10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

10 Stellar Meatless Dishes for the Fourth of July | Bob's Red Mill

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Sorghum

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is sorghum? Also know as milo, sorghum is a grain that originated in Africa thousands of years ago. It spread throughout the Middle East with traders, ultimately becoming a staple of the region and is still a heavily consumed grain in India. Though sorghum as a food is relatively unknown in most parts of the world, it has long been used as animal feed and for the production of sorghum syrup/molasses. (Interestingly, sorghum syrup is much more labor intensive than traditional cane and beet molasses. It’s production in the United States fell dramatically after World War II and is now more of a specialty regional item in the South.)

What is it? Wednesday: Sorghum | Bob's Red Mill

Is sorghum a whole grain? Yes, sorghum is a whole grain. The variety we offer is a round, golden kernel that is about the size of large pearl tapioca.

Is sorghum gluten free? Yes, sorghum is inherently gluten free. The grain and the flour we produce are made in our gluten free facility and tested for gluten.

What does it taste like? Sorghum has a mild, earthy flavor. It’s texture and flavor is similar to wheat berries and the flour has been called out as being the most wheat-like gluten free flour.

How do you use sorghum? Sorghum can be used in soups, salads, side dishes, pilafs and more. It makes a great substitute for wheat berries, pearl couscous and other gluten-full grains in most recipes. One of our favorite ways to enjoy sorghum is to pop it. It makes perfect little miniature “popcorn” that the kid in all of us will enjoy. Check out the video below for directions.

What about sorghum flour? Milled from whole grain sorghum, this flour is a great addition to gluten free baked goods. It has a good amount of protein and, when used in baking, helps with browning (something gluten free baked goods often struggle with). The protein also helps replicate the lost gluten, providing a more wheat-like texture.

Some of our favorite ways to enjoy whole grain sorghum:

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe's | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Monday: Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe’s

by Sarena Shasteen in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

In a family of meat eaters, non-meat eaters, celiacs, gluten intolerance, lactose intolerance, soy allergies and well, the usual personal picky preferences, coming up with meals that everyone will or can eat is sometimes a challenge. I won’t lie, we sometimes all eat different things, but for the most part, I like to keep things simple and have us all eat the same thing at meal times. After years of trial and error, I have found that playing around with old favorites by replacing a few things with new ingredients is my best option. This gives me a fighting changes when I’m changing things up so the guys here have a frame of reference when I tell them what’s for dinner. If I say “Sloppy Joe’s” they are all on board. If I try to get too descriptive, well, that will lead to a conversation that may not go in my favor. I keep things simple and no one is the wiser…

I love sorghum and the guys here do, too. The fact that it’s high in fiber and has a good protein content makes it a great addition to our meat free nights. Texture is a huge consideration for me when I’m playing around with recipes in the kitchen. I have some picky palates in the texture arena here. I like to consider foods that would ordinarily have a certain texture when I’m swapping out ingredients. This time around I went for a meatless sloppy joe. I combined sorghum and lentils to give my version of a sloppy joe that signature thick rich texture to hold up on the buns. These Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe’s did not disappoint either. They are full of flavor packed with wholesome ingredients and they are kid approved!

I served mine as sliders on cheesy tapioca rolls. You can never go wrong with making meals fun with finger foods either.

Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe's | Bob's Red Mill

Sorghum Lentil Sloppy Joe’s

(makes about 3 cups)

  • 1 medium Red Bell Pepper, diced small
  • 1 medium Onion, diced small
  • 2 tsp Olive Oil
  • 3/4 cup Whole Grain Sorghum
  • 3 cups Vegetable Stock
  • 3/4 cup Lentils
  • 1 (15 oz) can Tomato Sauce
  • 1 TBSP Cumin
  • 1 TBSP Chili Powder
  • 2 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 1 TBSP Honey or Brown Sugar
  • 1/2 tsp Salt

In a skillet, heat olive oil on medium heat. Add bell pepper and onion to the oil. Sauté until the vegetables are tender and the onions are translucent.

Next add sorghum and vegetable stock to the vegetables. Turn to high heat to bring the mixture to a boil. Once boiling, place a lid on the pan and turn the heat to low. Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add lentils to the pan turning the heat back up to boil. Once boiling, return the lid to the pan and reduce heat to low. Simmer for 30 minutes.

Add tomato sauce through salt to the sorghum lentil mixture. Turn the heat to medium and simmer. Stir frequently to avoid sticking to the pan. Cook until the mixture has reduced and thickened. This will take about 20 to 30 minutes.

Serve on your favorite rolls.

Sarena Shasteen: The Non Dairy QueenSarena Shasteen has been an avid health food and fitness enthusiast from an early age. She holds a degree in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Atlanta, a certification in Fitness Nutrition and is a certified Fitness Trainer from International Sport Science Association (ISSA). Becoming a Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition has been a lifelong goal of hers. Sarena enjoys helping others reach their health goals by teaching them that health and fitness are not only achieved in the gym, but also through fun everyday activities. Now a food writer, recipe developer, personal chef,  Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition, she enjoys sharing with others that healthy living can be fun and delicious. Keep up with her at The Non Dairy Queen and on Facebook and Twitter.

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Sarena Shasteen Google: Sarena Shasteen
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