What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Arrowroot Starch

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

Welcome to What is it? Wednesday! This week’s topic is Arrowroot Starch, AKA: Arrowroot Powder, Arrowroot Flour. A lesser-known ingredient than its starch brethren—corn, potato, tapioca—arrowroot is an incredibly useful ingredient that is often overlooked. It is frequently used in gluten free and allergy-free baking. Use it in place of cornstarch in baking, or for thickening cool liquids (read: ice cream). If you have questions we don’t address, leave them in the comments and I’ll do my best to find you an answer.

What is it? Wednesday: Arrowroot Starch | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Arrowroot starch is a very fine, white powder akin to cornstarch made from the tubers of the arrowroot plant. The arrowroot plant, Maranta arundinacea, is a perennial herb found in tropical climates. The origins of its name are a little mysterious. One source claims that the Arawak Indians called the plant aru-aru, “meal of meals.” While another claims that arrowroot was used medicinally, being placed on wounds made with poisoned arrows to draw out the toxins. With its medicinal properties, it might just be a little of both.

How do you use it? Like other starches, arrowroot starch is used as a thickening agent in liquids and supports proteins in baking to give baked goods form. It has virtually no flavor and is allergy-friendly, making it a great option for those avoiding corn, potatoes or gluten in general.

Arrowroot does not hold its thickening abilities like other starches and is best added near the end of heating. It should be mixed with liquid to create a slurry before adding to hot liquids to prevent clumping. There is a secret to a smooth sauce with arrowroot starch. Bring the sauce base to a simmer over medium-low heat. Next, whisk ¼ cup water and 2 Tbsp. arrowroot starch together to make a slurry. Stir the slurry into the simmering sauce and heat for one minute or until thickened.

How is it different from other starches? First off, arrowroot starch does not turn sauces cloudy like some starches, and it works at temperatures below a simmer. Arrowroot starch is neutral tasting and tolerates acidic ingredients, such as citrus (hello, lemon curd!). The starch also freezes well and dissolves well at lower temperatures. In fact, it must be cooked over low heat as it doesn’t endure high temperature cooking and does not reheat well. A final word to the wise, arrowroot does not do well in milk-based cream sauces (it changes the texture), but it bakes well in cakes, cookies and biscuits made with milk.

Sweet Potato-Almond Waffles with Crispy Oven-Baked Cornflake Chicken | Bob's Red Mill & Cara's Cravings

Try one of these fabulous recipes using Arrowroot Starch:

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Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Quick and easy-to-prepare, these Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies are a satisfying way to enjoy a treat while following a low carbohydrate diet. I’ve personally made them to take along on road trips for my family to provide a protein-rich snack that also cures the siren call of a sweet tooth. When you think of the many bars you can purchase, these cookies are a pretty solid way to enjoy fueling up.

Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Contributed by:  Amanda Carter

Prep Time: 10 minutes | Cook Time:  15 – 18 minutes | Yield: 20 cookies

  • 1 Tbsp Flaxseed Meal (7g)
  • 3 Tbsp Water (45mL)
  • 1 cup Hazelnut Meal (112g)
  • ½ cup Coconut Sugar (64g)
  • ½ tsp Baking Soda
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • ¾ cup Almond Butter (204g)
  • ½ cup Applesauce (112g)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ cup Dark Chocolate Chips (100g)

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Step 2

Mix flaxseed meal and water together in a small bowl and set aside to thicken.

Step 3

In a medium bowl, whisk together Bob’s Red Mill Hazelnut Meal, coconut sugar, baking soda and salt.

Step 4

In a large bowl, mix together almond butter, applesauce, vanilla extract and flax/water mixture.  Add dry ingredients to wet and mix well then stir in chocolate chips.

Step 5

Place approximately 1 ½ Tbsp (20g) of dough per cookie on the prepared baking sheet, leaving 1-inch between each cookie.  Bake until set, 15 – 18 minutes.

Step 6

Remove from the oven and let the cookies cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes, then move to a rack and let cool completely.

Each cookie contains: Calories 130, Calories from Fat 90, Total Fat 10g (15%), Saturated Fat 1.5g (8%), Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg (0%), Sodium 85mg (4%), Total Carbohydrate 10g (3%), Dietary Fiber 2g (8%), Sugars 6g, Protein 3g, Vitamin A 0%, Vitamin C 2%, Calcium 4%, Iron 4%.

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GF Scottish F

New Product: Gluten Free Scottish Oatmeal {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles, Gluten Free

If you’re familiar with Bob’s Red Mill, you probably already know how much we love Scotland. Maybe it’s a kinship we feel with a country that is almost always rainy and cool (much like our beloved Oregon) or maybe we love it for birthing our favorite food, oatmeal. Maybe it’s because they awarded us the title of World Porridge Champions in 2009, or maybe it’s because they’re just so darn nice over there. No matter what is at the heart of it, Bob has always loved Scotland and, after a visit many years ago, his love fueled the creation of our Scottish Oatmeal. It was in Scotland that Bob first tasted and fell in love with traditional Scottish oats.

NEW GF Scottish Oatmeal | Bob's Red Mill

Ground on stone mills, this oatmeal is a true meal. It is smooth and creamy with a texture closer to farina than what we typically associate with oatmeal. It’s not chewy like rolled or steel cut oats, but it still has a bit of bite and texture. This isn’t gruel, but it is a unique breakfast experience.

The Gilgamesh | Bob's Red Mill

We have yet to find anything in the States that compares to our Scottish Oatmeal, which is why we are very excited to add Gluten Free Scottish Oatmeal to our robust gluten free oat line. We take the same high-quality, gluten free tested and verified oats that you know and trust and run them through our specialized stone mills in our gluten free facility to create a new, whole grain cereal perfect for warming you up on these brisk *almost* spring days.

To celebrate our new addition and our undying love for Scotland, we’re giving away a package of Gluten Free Scottish Oatmeal to five lucky winners. To enter, follow the prompts below. We’ll select five winners at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 04/08/14.


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Meatless Mondays: Curried Sweet Potato & Millet Soup {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook by Judith Finlayson is a fabulous resource of whole grain recipes that anyone can enjoy. What I love about this book is that it’s a book about grains that are inherently gluten free (amaranth, buckwheat, corn, millet, oats, quinoa, rice, sorghum, teff, wild rice) without focusing on what is missing from the dishes. Think of it as a celebration of the myriad other grains beyond wheat, rye and barley. Some of the best grains on the planet are free from gluten. 

The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook by Judith Finlayson

Finlayson has a history with vegetarian and slow cooker cookbooks and she brings this experience to the gluten free realm. The recipes are approachable, even if they sound hard like Moroccan-style Millet Stuffing and Coconut-Spiked Pork with Quinoa and Peanuts. All of the recipes come with tips for ways to simplify or elaborate the recipe and many come with variations for making the dish vegetarian. The majority of the dishes are accompanied by beautiful photography and they all have nutritional breakdowns which is a huge bonus and not something most cookbooks offer.

From breakfast to dessert, this book has it all. Finlayson kicks off The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook with a thorough guide to whole grains. She covers their history, how to store them, how to buy them and the nutrition they bring to your table. Needless to say, we love this book.

The generous folks at Robert Rose Publishing have offered us a single copy to give away to one lucky reader. We’ll pair this book with a package of amaranth, millet, quinoa, teff and sorghum to get you started. This is a fun whole grains gift set that anyone- gluten free or otherwise- will certainly enjoy. To enter, follow the prompts in the app at the bottom of this post. We’ll pick a winner at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 3/31/14. Winners must be over 18 and are limited to US and Canadian residents only.  To pick up a copy of the book now, visit your favorite book retailer or Amazon.com

Curried Sweet Potato and Millet Soup | Bob's Red Mill

Curried Sweet Potato and Millet Soup

VEGAN FRIENDLY

This soup is a lovely combination of flavors and texture. It has a mild curry taste, enhanced with the addition of orange and a hint of sweetness from the maple syrup. The toasted walnuts add taste and an appealing bit of crunch, while the optional yogurt provides a creamy finish. Although this is a great cold weather soup, it’s light enough to be enjoyed any time of the year — perhaps even for dinner with the addition of salad.

Tips

To get this quantity of puréed sweet potato, bake, peel and mash 2 medium sweet potatoes, each about 6 oz (175 g). You can also use a can (14 oz/398 mL) sweet potato purée.

Toasting brings out millet’s pleasantly nutty flavor. To toast, heat in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it crackles and releases its aroma, for 5 minutes.

  • 1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil (15 mL)
  • 2 Onions, finely chopped
  • 2 Carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 stalks Celery, diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp minced Ginger Root (10 mL)
  • 2 tsp Curry Powder (10 mL)
  • 1 tsp freshly grated Orange Zest (5 mL)
  • 2 cups Sweet Potato Purée (500 mL)
  • 6 cups Vegetable Stock (1.5 L)
  • 3⁄4 cup Millet, toasted (175 mL)
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed Orange Juice (250 mL)
  • 1⁄4 cup pure Maple Syrup (60 mL)
  • Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper
  •  Toasted chopped Walnuts or sliced Almonds
  • Plain Yogurt, optional

1.    In a large saucepan or stockpot, heat oil over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add onions, carrots and celery and cook, stirring, until carrots have softened, about 7 minutes.

2.    Add garlic, ginger, curry powder and orange zest and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add sweet potato and stock and stir well. Bring to a boil. Stir in millet. Reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer until millet is tender and flavors have blended, about 30 minutes.

3.    Add orange juice and maple syrup and heat through. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle into bowls and garnish with toasted walnuts and a drizzle of yogurt, if using.

Makes 6 servings

Excerpted from The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook by Judith Finlayson © 2013 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with publisher permission.


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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Hazelnut Meal/Flour

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

I bet you didn’t even know there was such a thing as Hazelnut Meal. Almond Meal is endlessly popular and seems there is a flour/meal for every nut now (no pun intended). We’ve been milling hazelnut meal for quite a while, 10 years to be exact, but, until recently, it was relatively unknown. As low carbohydrate and paleo diets gain in popularity, there seems to be a need for more variety in ingredients, and we’re here to oblige.

Hazelnuts | Bob's Red Mill

What is it, exactly? It’s quite simply, hazelnuts that have been ground into a meal. The nature of nut flours is such that you get some very fine pieces and some slightly larger pieces. Overall, the product is quite fine, but it is not as fine as a wheat flour, hence the term “meal” is used often to describe this product. We leave the skins intact, so you get the whole nutrition that hazelnuts (also known as filberts) offer.  Hazelnut meal is a gluten free flour with no real starch of which to speak. Whole grains are composed of three parts, one of which is primarily starch and protein (endosperm). This piece of the grain is what comprises white flour. Nuts are a whole different story. They have a considerably lower proportion of carbohydrates and starch than a grain does. Making them great for low carb diets, but not so great for baking in the way that we typically think of it.

Why would you use Hazelnut Meal? There are many reasons, but they break down into a few broad groups.

  1. You are a baker looking for a decadent addition to your baked goods.
  2. You are gluten free and looking for a way to boost the nutritional content of your baked goods.
  3. You are following a low carbohydrate diet or some variety- be it for weight loss or diabetes management.Hazelnut Meal | Bob's Red Mill

How do you use it? You can use it the same way you would almond meal. I’m going to break it down for folks who might not be familiar with using nut flours in their daily lives. Because hazelnut meal does not contain gluten and is light on starches, it should be used in conjunction with other flours. Our suggestion is to replace no more than 25- 30% of the flour in your recipe with hazelnut meal. This will bring a richness and nutty texture to your baked goods. If you are looking to create baked goods with a low carbohydrate load, it can be used on its own or in conjunction with other flours that will help give it structure. As with coconut flour, we highly recommend using a recipe that is designed for hazelnut meal or almond meal to get started.

It also makes a fantastic coating for proteins like chicken and fish and a great addition to smoothies. For recipe inspiration, look for recipes using almond meal and think outside of the box. Look for places that ask you to grind up hazelnuts and use our flour instead. It’s the same thing, only we do all the work for you and you don’t have to wash your food processor.

Hazelnut Pancakes with Coconut Chocolate Syrup | The Roasted Root

We have some great recipes using hazelnut meal coming up later in the week, but get started using it today with one of these fabulous recipes.

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Red Bean and Kamut Soup F

Meatless Monday Explained + Red Bean and Kamut® Soup

by Guest in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

How many times have you heard something like this: “The foundation of a healthy diet is fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains.”

For many of us—especially seasoned home cooks—this is old news, and it may not even be something we think about all that often. We love plants, of course we eat them every day!

But the truth is, actually consuming the full recommended number of servings of these healthy foods on a daily basis is difficult, even for a registered dietitian like myself. Current dietary guidelines recommend five servings of produce and six ounces of grains daily for most people. Eating meat at every meal – or even every day – can make this a challenge.

In 2003, renowned advertising mogul Sid Lerner revived Meatless Monday (once popular as a war conservation effort) as a way to encourage the public to reduce their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol from animal products and eat more healthy plant foods. Since then, individuals, organizations and brands like Bob’s Red Mill have adopted the initiative to help spread the message about the benefits of periodic meatless eating.

Red Bean and Kamut Soup | Bob's Red Mill

In my work promoting Meatless Monday, I find that each eater is inspired to join the campaign for a slightly different reason. Some of the most popular include:

For health: Research shows that those who follow diets low in animal products and high in plant foods have lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of developing cancer and heart disease, lower blood pressure and lower total mortality. Meatless foods, especially whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables are packed full of fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

To discover a new favorite: It’s easy to fall into a meal rut and cook up the same old chicken breast or ground beef most nights. Challenging yourself to go meat-free one day a week can provide inspiration to finally try that curious vegetable or ancient grain you keep hearing about. You may discover a new healthy favorite that will become a regular feature in your diet on other days of the week.

For solidarity: Social support is a huge element of any healthy habit. Even if you regularly eat meatless meals, making a specific effort to do it on Mondays and to share your habit with those in your household or via social media can inspire others to make Meatless Monday and plant-based eating a regular habit, too. It’s also exciting to know you’re participating in a global movement – over 30 countries now have active Meatless Monday campaigns.

For the environment: Eating less meat is an environmentally friendly choice, since production of animal foods is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions.

meatlessmonday_logo

As Meatless Monday’s dietitian, I often hear concerns about whether you can still get enough protein without eating meat. The answer is a resounding yes! Very few people in the United States get too little protein, even among full-time vegetarians. And most plant foods contain more protein than we think, whole grains especially. Quinoa has developed a reputation for being a protein superstar over the past few years, but interestingly, many other whole grains pack in even more protein per serving than the popular South American seed. Amaranth, millet, farro and Kamut® wheat come in at about seven or eight grams of protein per one-fourth cup serving as compared to quinoa’s five.

In the spirit of discovering new favorites on Meatless Monday, I decided to give Kamut® Khorasan Wheat a shot. Kamut® wheat, while technically an ancient wheat, sure looks a lot like brown rice, so I was inspired to try it out in a twist on traditional red beans and rice.

Beans and grains have historically been paired together not only because of their complementary flavors, but because when combined, the proteins from the two plants provide all of the essential amino acids we need to carry out our daily functions. There’s actually no need to make sure you get each of the essential amino acids in the same meatless meal, but that doesn’t mean the combination isn’t still delicious and worthy of a spot in your next Meatless Monday dinner.

Red Bean and Kamut Soup | Bob's Red Mill

Red Bean and Kamut® Soup

Serves 4

  • 1 cup Kamut® Khorasan Wheat
  • 3 Tbsp Olive Oil or Butter
  • 1 medium Onion, diced
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 6 cups Vegetable Stock
  • 1 ½ cups Tomato Puree
  • 2 (15 oz.) cans Red Beans
  • 2 Tbsp Chili Powder
  • 2 tsp dried Thyme
  • 1/2 tsp Cayenne Pepper
  • 3 Bay Leaves
  • Salt to taste (consider salt content of vegetable stock)

Soak Kamut in water overnight. Before cooking, drain and discard soaking water.

In a large stockpot or dutch oven, heat butter or olive oil over medium heat. Add onions, saute until translucent, about 10 minutes. Add garlic and saute one minute more.

Add soaked Kamut and remaining ingredients. Mix well, cover, reduce heat to low and simmer 40 minutes to one hour, until Kamut has cooked and flavors are combined.

Remove bay leaves and serve.

Diana Rice, RD | Meatless MondaysDiana K. Rice, RD is the registered dietitian and recipe editor on staff with The Monday Campaigns, a nonprofit public health marketing initiative dedicated to using the first day of the week to prompt healthy behavior changes. Diana focuses her efforts on the organization’s nutrition-oriented initiatives Meatless Monday, The Kids Cook Monday and Healthy Monday. She has studied at NYU, the University of Northern Colorado and Cedar Crest College and is an advocate for sustainable agriculture and children’s nutrition education. Contact The Monday Campaigns to start a campaign in your area and keep up with Diana on Twitter.

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Quinoa Cover F

Peanut Butter Quinoa Granola {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

I recently heard someone say they were “quinoa-d out.” Quinoa does seem to be everywhere these days and it’s becoming so main stream that people like David Lynch are incorporating it into artsy projects. You may be feeling a little quinoa-d out yourself, but never fear, we have 500 Best Quinoa Recipes to share with you! Ok, we technically only have one, but it’s a wonderful recipe! This book is would be a fabulous cookbook to have on hand to inspire your love of quinoa. And, if you don’t love quinoa, I’m pretty sure this book will have something to change your mind.

500 Best Quinoa Recipes by Camilla Saulsbury | Bob's Red Mill

500 Best Quinoa Recipes by Camilla Saulsbury (of Power Hungry and a 2013 Spar for the Spurtle finalist) is full of recipes using quinoa for every meal of the day, including dessert. Recipes cover the full gamut from familiar, Sweet Potato and Black Bean Salad, to adventuresome, Seared Salmon with Pineapple Mint Quinoa. All of the recipes are gluten free, though, as is the case with many books we promote, the recipes are certainly not missing anything by leaving gluten out. The book starts off with an explanation of quinoa and its health benefits, and includes a handy guide on stocking your pantry with the ingredients for these recipes. There are so many delicious sounding options- you would never get bored!  Spicy Maple Pumpkin Soup, Caramelized Onion Quinoa Tart, Shepherd’s Pie with Sweet Potato Mash, Ginger Cardamom Drop Scones… the list goes on!

This book is really quite amazing and I am so proud of the work Camilla has done. I think you’ll enjoy it, too. Robert Rose has generously offered us a copy of this tome to give away to one lucky reader. We’ll pair this book with a quinoa starter kit, containing a package each of our gluten free and organic white quinoa, red quinoa, tricolor quinoa  and quinoa flour to help you get started. To enter, follow the prompts in the form at the bottom of the post. We’ll pick one winner at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 3/16/14.

Peanut Butter Quinoa Granola | Bob's Red Mill

Peanut Butter and Quinoa Granola

I have fond memories of my mother’s homemade granola, rich with nuts, honey and toasted oats. My version ups the flavor and nutrition ante with quinoa, peanut butter and dried cranberries. Spoon it up with milk, sprinkle it on yogurt or pack a handful in a small plastic bag for a mid-morning boost.

Tip

Any unsweetened natural nut or seed butter (such as cashew, almond, sunflower seed or tahini) may be used in place of the peanut butter.

•    Preheat oven to 325°F (160°C)
•    Large rimmed baking sheet, lined with parchment paper

  • 2 cups     large-flake (old-fashioned) rolled oats (500 mL) (certified GF, if needed)
  • 3⁄4 cup    quinoa, rinsed (175 mL)
  • 3⁄4 cup    lightly salted roasted peanuts, coarsely (175 mL) chopped
  • 1⁄2 tsp    fine sea salt (2 mL)
  • 1⁄2 tsp    ground cinnamon (2 mL)
  • 1⁄4 cup    natural cane sugar or packed light (60 mL) brown sugar
  • 1⁄4 cup    liquid honey or brown rice syrup (60 mL)
  • 1⁄2 cup    unsweetened natural peanut butter (125 mL)
  • 1⁄3 cup    vegetable oil (75 mL)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (GF, if needed) (5 mL)
  • 2⁄3 cup    dried cranberries (150 mL)

1.   In a large bowl, combine oats, quinoa, peanuts, salt and cinnamon.

2.   In a small saucepan, combine sugar and honey. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring constantly. Turn off heat and stir in peanut butter, oil and vanilla until blended.

3.   Pour peanut butter mixture over oat mixture and stir until coated. Spread mixture in a single layer on prepared baking sheet.

4.   Bake in preheated oven for 40 minutes, stirring twice, until golden brown. Let cool completely on pan.

5.   Transfer granola to an airtight container and stir in cranberries. Store at room temperature for up to 2 weeks.

Makes about 4 cups (1 L)

Excerpted from 500 Best Quinoa Recipes by Camilla V. Saulsbury © 2012 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with publisher permission. Photos by Colin Erricson 


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Natural New-Tella Granola F

Natural New-Tella Granola

by Alisa Fleming in Gluten Free, Recipes

Whole foods are a new thing to my teenage niece, who has lived with us for the past year. I was able to transition her into whole grains, increase her fruit intake, and even get her to “like” salads. But for the level of exercise she now enjoys, her protein intake is still a bit deficient, particularly in the morning. Since she isn’t a fan of chomping on whole nuts or nut chunks, I decided to get a little creative by using hazelnut meal along with hearty oats and her favorite morning food, chocolate.

Natural New-Tella Granola | Bob's Red Mill

In this Nutella-inspired granola, the hazelnut meal blends seamlessly with the oats and natural chocolate coating for a delicious flavor without the overpowering presence of whole nuts. She LOVES it, and luckily, my husband and I do, too.

To note, I use certified gluten-free oats in this recipe to keep it gluten-free for my husband. I also use allergy-friendly chocolate chips for a dairy-free granola. If you want an even more wholesome option, feel free to substitute cacao nibs for the chocolate chips. It will yield a slightly less sweet, more dark chocolate-hazelnut granola.

Natural New-Tella Granola | Bob's Red Mill

Natural New-Tella Granola

Yield: 4-1/2 cups

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

Method

Preheat your oven to 250ºF.

Place the oats and hazelnut meal in a large bowl, and toss to combine.

Place the sweetener, oil, cocoa, vanilla, and salt in a medium bowl, and whisk until smooth.

Pour the chocolate mixture over the oat-hazelnut mixture, and stir until all the oats are well-coated.

Spread the uncooked granola onto a large baking sheet, pressing it into somewhat of a single layer.

Bake for 60 to 90 minutes, checking in to stir every 30 minutes. It should appear toasted, but not burnt, yet will still feel a bit soft (it will crisp up as it cools).

While the granola is still hot, gently stir in some or all of the chocolate chips (we usually add about half), just folding it in a few times; they will melt and “cluster” the granola just a little.

Once cool, stir any remaining chocolate chips into the granola.

Natural New-Tella Granola- Mocha and Vanilla options | Bob's Red Mill

Mocha Option (left)

You can add 1/2 teaspoon instant coffee to 1 tablespoon ground coffee (your favorite) depending on your desired intensity. Also, some dairy-free dark chocolate covered coffee beans would make a tasty addition in place of the chocolate chips.

Vanilla Hazelnut Option (right)

While I do love chocolate, I’m a devoted vanilla lover first and foremost. For my breakfasts, I decided to balance this dark chocolate yin flavor with a light yang cereal: Vanilla Hazelnut Granola.

Alisa Fleming, Go Dairy FreeAlisa is the founder of GoDairyFree.org, Senior Editor for Allergic Living magazine, and author of the best-selling dairy-free book, Go Dairy Free: The Guide and Cookbook for Milk Allergies, Lactose Intolerance, and Casein-Free Living. Alisa has three new books in the works, and is also a professional recipe creator and product ambassador for the natural food industry. Her dietary specialty is dairy-free, but she also has expertise in gluten-free and allergy-friendly.

 

 

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Coconut Flour

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

Coconut is all the rage these days—coconut oil, coconut milk, coconut sugar—if it has coconut in it, it must be good for you. For the most part that is true and coconut flour is no exception. It’s tremendously rich in dietary fiber and very low in carbohydrates. These two factors combine to make a product that is especially ideal for those who need to be conscious of their blood sugar and who are following a low carbohydrate diet. It’s naturally gluten free, so it’s becoming very popular with those on a gluten free diet. This is one of the most difficult and confusing Bob’s Red Mill products to use. It’s not impossible and it is totally worth learning how to use it, but this product does not behave like a typical flour and presents some unique challenges in baking.

What is it? Wednesday: Coconut Flour | Bob's Red Mill

How is it made? Coconut flour is made from the flesh of mature coconuts after coconut oil has been extracted. The remaining coconut contains only about 15% of the oil from the original coconut. The flesh is dried at temperatures above 118°F to eliminate any microbes and is held at 179°F for approximately 30 minutes, which means this product is not considered raw by most raw foodists.

Does it taste like coconut? Because there is no milk and most of the oils have been removed, coconut flour does not have a strong coconut flavor. I’d be lying if I said it was void of any coconut flavor, but it is quite mild and would be masked by any strong flavor like chocolate, coffee, garlic or almond. It’s similar to coconut oil, actually, there is a hint of the coconut, but it’s not like baking with ground up shredded coconut.

Does it contain sulfites? No. I cannot vouch for all coconut flour, but our coconut flour does not contain sulfites or any other preservatives.

How do you use it? That’s the real meat of the issue, isn’t it? How do you use such a unique flour? The single, most important thing to remember about coconut flour is that it is very high in fiber and requires a lot of liquid. More than you would think, actually. If you look at coconut flour recipes, they often call for a lot of eggs (I’m talking 6 to 8 whole eggs for a single recipe).  At first glance, you’ll think it’s an error and it can’t possibly need that many eggs. The thing is, though, it really does. The eggs help replace the gluten and balance out the high amount of fiber. If you are egg-free, try The Spunky Coconut. She has many recipes that are egg-free.

You’ll be relieved to know that there are so many wonderful food bloggers out there experimenting with this product and finding ways around the use of a dozen eggs for a single recipe. They’re getting creative and coming up with recipes like Chocolate Glazed Strawberry Donuts (Cara’s Cravings), Chocolate Marbled Cupcakes (Jeanette’s Healthy Living) and Vanilla Coconut Poundcake (Non-Dairy Queen, below).

Vanilla Coconut Poundcake

Here are tips from our Test Kitchen:

  • Store coconut flour in the fridge or freezer for the longest shelf life.
  • Coconut flour can replace up to 20% of the total flour in a recipe.  Liquid will need to be increased by 20% as well.
  • It is recommended that you use an equal part coconut flour to liquid.
  • Coconut flour is very high in fiber and will absorb large amounts of liquid.  These batters may not resemble the same batter made with wheat flour.
  • Increasing the fat in a 100% coconut flour recipe will keep the product moist without having to add excessive amounts of liquid.
  • Some 100% coconut flour recipes may appear too runny.  Let the batter sit for a few minutes to absorb the liquid.  The liquid will be absorbed further during baking.
  • Reducing the sugar or granulated sweetener will make the final product drier and crumbly.
  • Always sift coconut flour before using.
  • To store baked goods with significant amounts of coconut flour, wrap loosely in plastic.  If no air is allowed to circulate, the baked good may become soggy.

My single tip for getting to know coconut flour? TRY AN EXISTING COCONUT FLOUR RECIPE. Don’t reinvent the wheel. Use a tried and true recipe. We have a few on our website and there are so many amazing bloggers out there doing a great job with it. Check out All Day I Dream About Food, Jeanette’s Healthy Living, Cara’s Cravings and The Spunky Coconut for some inspiration.

Finally, find more great tips from Jeanette’s Healthy Living and watch this video for even more insight.

Finally, we received some great customer questions on Facebook and I’ll try to address some of them here. These are the questions that I wasn’t sure how to work into the narrative.

Coconut Flour and Browning: Some customers have found that baked goods made with coconut flour brown more easily. While we have not found this to be true here, we think this could have something to do with the natural sugar in the flour.

Coconut flour is gluten free, do I need to use Xanthan Gum? Yes and no. If you are baking a 100% coconut flour recipe with a bevy of eggs, it is likely that you will not need xanthan gum. If you are adding coconut flour to a gluten free blend or are not using a recipe heavy in eggs, xanthan gum might be necessary.

How many carbs does it contain per serving? A 2 Tbsp serving of Coconut Flour contains 8 grams of Carbohydrates (3 grams net carbs). Keep in mind that you use far less coconut flour than conventional wheat flour in recipes.

I have a coconut allergy, will I react to coconut flour? Unlike coconut oil, coconut flour contains coconut protein and will cause an allergic reaction if you are sensitive to coconuts.

I hope this clears up some of the mysteries about coconut flour. Have more questions? Leave them in the comments and I’ll try to get you an answer right away.

About The Author
Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Apple Cinnamon Walnut Brown Rice Farina | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Mondays: Apple Cinnamon Walnut Brown Rice Farina

by Julia Mueller in Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Howdy doody, Bob’s Blog readers! I’m Julia Mueller from The Roasted Root! I’ll be joining you here from time to time with recipes using Bob’s Red Mill’s products. I’ve been using Bob’s products ever since I began the search for cooking and baking alternatives to wheat three years ago. Through the BRM product line, I continually learn about new ways of using whole grains, flours, and nut meals to whip up delicious eats. Recently, I have been eating brown rice farina as porridge for breakfast and I can’t think of a better way to start the day!

When I was a kid, I loved the instant cream of wheat that came with fruit topping pouches. I remember the commercials where kids would be using the fruity topping to draw pictures in their cream of wheat. Free-style art on my breakfast food? Sign me up!  I poked and prodded my parents until they bought into it. From there on out, I was sold down Cream of Wheat River.

Apple Cinnamon Walnut Brown Rice Farina | Bob's Red Mill

BUT! Gone are the days of instant cream of wheat with little drawing packets. That river dried up long ago. Not only because I no longer have the time to draw on my breakfast before I leave for work in the morning, but also because I limit my intake of wheat to a bare minimum. For this reason, breakfast porridge made from oatmeal, quinoa, or brown rice farina is now my go-to fuel in the morning.

But the farina fun doesn’t stop in the morning – oh no! One of the best parts about brown rice farina is its versatility. Not only can you get creative with it for breakfast, but you can use it in cakes, or even serve savory meals on top of it. The end result is bound to be tasty, healthful, and satisfying.

Add apple cinnamon walnut brown rice farina to the list of genius ideas to get children to eat their breakfast. It’s very quick to throw together (10 to 12 minutes is all it takes!), and the apple-cinnamon flavors coupled with the naturally sweet maple syrup are sure to win anyone’s affection. Case in point: this is a healthful, easy meal that can appeal to breakfast eaters of all ages.

Are you sold down Brown Rice Farina River? I certainly hope you have a marvelous journey, filled with apple, cinnamon, walnut splendor.

Apple Cinnamon Walnut Brown Rice Farina | Bob's Red Mill

Apple Cinnamon Walnut Brown Rice Farina 

Ingredients:

  • 3-1/4 cups Water
  • 1 large Apple (I used Honeycrisp), peeled and finely chopped or shredded
  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Brown Rice Farina
  • ½ teaspoon ground Cinnamon
  • ½ cup Walnuts, chopped
  • 2.5 tablespoons pure Maple Syrup (or to taste)*
  • Almond Milk, Coconut Milk, or regular Milk for serving

*You can also sweeten the brown rice farina with brown sugar if you don’t have pure maple syrup available

Instructions:

  1. Add the water and chopped apple to a pot and bring to a full boil. Boil gently for 5 to 8 minutes to soften the apple.
  2. Slowly stir in the brown rice farina, cinnamon, and walnuts, and stir consistently as the farina thickens. Continue cooking for 5 to 8 minutes, then add the maple syrup and stir to combine.
  3. Serve with almond milk, coconut milk, regular milk, and/or a dollop of yogurt on top.

JuliaMuellerJulia Mueller’s two greatest passions are food and the great outdoors. Creator of the food blog, The Roasted Root, Julia enjoys whipping up and photographing nutrient-dense recipes that are healthful yet comforting, and are approachable to make any night of the week. Most of her recipes are vegetable and meat-based, gluten-free and refined-sugar free. Julia is also the author of the cookbooks, Delicious Probiotic Drinks, and Let Them Eat Kale! An avid mountain biker and snowboarder, Julia enjoys balancing work with playing outside in the mountains. Keep up with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Julia Mueller Google: Julia Mueller
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