marbledcupcakes F

Chocolate Marble Cupcakes

by Cassidy Stockton in Gluten Free, Recipes

In honor of Valentine’s Day, we’re pulling out a few recipes from the archives this week to make your celebrations a little tastier. 

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marbledcupcakes1
These decadent gluten free, dairy free cupcakes come from Jeanette Chen of Jeanette’s Healthy Living. Jeanette’s Healthy Living is all about delicious and healthy foods, made with whole ingredients. Jeanette’s blog features recipes that fit her motto that every recipe has to taste great – to be eaten, not left untouched, appeal to the eye, and provide the nutrients your bodies need.

MarbledCupcakes2

Chocolate Marble Cupcakes {Gluten-Free}

Dairy-Free Buttermilk:

  • 1 cup Almond Milk or other Non-Dairy Milk
  • 1 Tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar or Lemon Juice

Cake:

  • 1/2 cup sifted Almond Flour
  • 1/2 cup Brown Rice Flour
  • 1/4 cup sifted Coconut Flour
  • 3/4 cup Tapioca Flour
  • 1 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp Baking Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 2 tsp Xanthan Gum
  • 1/2 cup sifted Cocoa
  • 1/4 cup Dairy-Free Chocolate Chips
  • 1/2 cup Olive Oil
  • 1 cup organic Sugar
  • 2 Tbsp Pumpkin Puree or Applesauce (or 2 Egg Yolks)
  • 1-1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 2 Egg Whites
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. To make dairy-free buttermilk, combine almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl. Let sit for 15 minutes until curdled.
  3. To make cake, whisk together almond flour, brown rice flour, coconut flour, tapioca starch, baking soda, baking powder, salt and xanthan gum in a medium bowl.
  4. In a large bowl, beat together olive oil and sugar until combined. Add pumpkin puree and vanilla extract and beat until mixed in.
  5. Add flour mixture alternately with “buttermilk,” mixing well with each addition.
  6. Whip egg whites until stiff. Fold into cake batter until thoroughly blended.
  7. Remove 1/3 of batter into a bowl. Add cocoa and mix thoroughly. Stir in chocolate chips. Mixture will be stiff and somewhat dry.
  8. Alternate spoonfuls of regular and chocolate batter into lined muffin tins.
  9. Use a knife to swirl and marbleize the batter. You can do this by twirling a butter knife in the batter.
  10. Bake for 15-18 minutes until toothpick comes out clean.
  11. Remove to rack to cool.
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Spicy Veggie Burgers F

{Meatless Mondays} Spicy Veggie Burgers

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

This veggie burger recipe was submitted by customer Amber Johnson, and we had to make them right away to be sure they were up to snuff. Then we had to make them again because they were so awesome. The Indian flavors give these vegan burger patties an exotic flair that we just cannot get over and the use of brown rice farina helps them hold together better than some veggie burgers. Serve these with the traditional lettuce/tomato/ketchup or take it further with chutney and mustard or amaranth greens. Make these gluten free by choosing gluten free bread crumbs or leaving them out altogether.

Spicy Veggie Burgers | Bob's Red Mill vegan and gluten free

Spicy Veggie Burgers

submitted by: Amber Johnson

Serves 6 – 8 | Prep Time: 30 minutes | Cook Time: 17 – 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup Bob’s Red Mill Lentils washed & sorted
  • 8 oz Red Potatoes peeled & cubed
  • 1/2 cup Carrots shredded
  • 1/2 cup Frozen Peas defrosted
  • 1/2 cup Onion finely chopped
  • 3 Garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 tsp Ginger Root peeled & minced
  • 1/4 cup Creamy Brown Rice Farina (uncooked)
  • 1/2 tsp ground Cumin
  • 1/4 tsp Curry Powder
  • 1/4 tsp Mustard Seeds (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper
  • 2 tsp Cilantro
  • 1/2 cup Plain Bread Crumbs (optional)

Combine Bob’s Red Mill Lentils and potatoes in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until soft, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat, drain and let cool.

While lentils and potatoes cook, preheat oven to 400°F and lightly oil a baking dish or parchment lined sheet tray.

Transfer the cooked and cooled lentil mixture to a large bowl. Mash until smooth.

Add carrots, peas, onion, garlic, ginger, Bob’s Red Mill Creamy Brown Rice Farina, spices, salt and cilantro to the lentil mixture and mix very well to combine.

Divide the mixture into 6 – 8 portions, about 1/3 – 1/2 cup of mixture for each patty. Shape each portion into 4-inch patties and coat in bread crumbs, if desired.

Place formed patties onto prepared baking sheet and bake for 17 – 20 minutes, flipping patties over after the first 10 minutes.

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Brown Sugar Banana Flax Popcorn F

Get Seedy with Your Popcorn

by Sarah House in Recipes

Every New Year, we (or a least a LOT of us) make resolutions to get healthy.  We renew our gym memberships, stock our pantry with healthy foods, and cut out snacking all together.  And we do pretty good!  For about two weeks.  Then we find ourselves passing by our coworker’s candy dish a bit more often or justifying those TWO brownies for dessert by thinking that tomorrow’s 30 minute workout will totally negate at least one brownie, right?  I’m not alone here, am I?

Brown Sugar Banana Flax Popcorn | Bob's Red Mill

Yes, I have a sweet tooth.  And a savory one.  I like my snacks!  Total denial of that pleasure won’t make my healthy goals any more attainable.  One of my snacking saviors is the ole movie theater stand-by:  popcorn.

Chia Chile Lime Popcorn | Bob's Red Mill

When I crave something crunchy, I find myself turning more and more often to popcorn.  In my opinion, it’s a contender for the best snack ever.  Crunchy, filling, whole-grain and a breeze to prepare, many a movie night at my house is accompanied by freshly popped Bob’s Red Mill Popcorn.  I’m a sucker for the classic butter and salt but when I’m feeling a bit more exotic or just want to impress my guests, tossing together some herbs, spices and Bob’s Red Mill seeds takes my popcorn from standard to fancy with minimal effort.  Seeds are nutrition and flavor powerhouses that require zero prep.  After I drizzle on melted butter or coconut oil, I toss in my seeds of choice and plop on the couch for some serious entertainment.

Herbed Garlic Hemp Popcorn | Bob's Red Mill

For ½ cup (unpopped) popcorn kernels and ¼ cup melted butter, coconut oil or blend of oils, try:

  • Brown Sugar Banana Flax: 1 Tbsp Bob’s Red Mill Golden Flaxseed Meal + 2 Tbsp brown sugar + 1 tsp salt + ¼ cup crushed dried banana chips
  • Chia Chile Lime: 1 Tbsp Bob’s Red Mill Chia Seeds + 2 tsp hot sauce + 1 tsp salt + zest from one lime (note:  personal fave!)
  • Herbed Garlic Hemp: 1 Tbsp Bob’s Red Mill Hemp Seed Hearts + 1 Tbsp sweet cream buttermilk powder + ½ tsp garlic salt + ½ tsp minced dried rosemary + ½ tsp dried parsley + ¼ tsp ground black pepper
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Hemp Seed Hearts

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday

Welcome to What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

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Hemp seeds: the mysterious, slightly illicit ingredient that keeps popping up all over the place. The ingredient that is incredibly healthful and delicious, yet still often triggers our firewall. The thing is, though, that hemp seeds are pretty darn nutritious and have nothing to offer those folks who are looking for a “good time.” Like a good kid with a bad friend, hemp seeds are guilty by association. I don’t think I’m wrong to say that’s changing. Many people have gotten over the association and recognize hemp seeds for what they are- a wonderful way to include protein and omega-3s in your diet.

What is it? Hemp seed hearts, aka hulled hemp seed, are small cream-colored seeds about the size of a sesame seed. They have a nutty flavor and nut-like texture, more creamy than crunchy. The term heart is often used to describe the seed without its hull, as in the heart of the seed.

Why would you eat it? Hemp is high in protein and contains all eight essential amino acids, classifying it as a complete protein. Hemp also contains a nice amount of Omega-3 fatty acids. Plus, they just plain taste good, so that’s always a good reason to eat them.

What is it? Wednesday: Hemp | Bob's Red Mill

How do you use it? Hemp seeds are pretty versatile. They have such a mild flavor that they can go sweet or savory. A basic way to enjoy hemp seed is to add it to your hot cereal or smoothie. Hemp can also be added to salads, baked goods and yogurt. Unlike chia and flax, hemp is not as high in fiber, so the addition of hemp will not dramatically alter the outcome of your recipe. We personally love this recipe using hemp in place of pine nuts for pesto. Not only are hemp seeds more nutritious than pine nuts, they’re far cheaper these days.

What about its connection to marijuana? Hemp seeds and marijuana come from the same species of plant, but different varieties and the similarities stop there. Hemp seeds do not contain THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), the active substance in marijuana.

Can you eat it raw? Yes, absolutely. Like nuts, hemp seeds are also wonderful gently toasted.

Can you eat it whole? Yes, hemp seeds do not need to be ground to enjoy the nutritional benefits. If you grind them, you’ll most likely end up with a paste similar to tahini.

Is it vegan? Yes, hemp seed are vegan.

Are Bob’s Red Mill hemp seeds gluten free? No, while hemp is naturally free from gluten, we do not produce our hemp seeds in our gluten free facility or batch test them for gluten. UPDATE: As of May, hemp seeds produced at Bob’s Red Mill are batch tested for gluten and packaged in our gluten free facility. New packaging will reflect the gluten free symbol. If this is important to you, be sure to look for our gluten free symbol on the package. 

Hemp Protein Truffles | Bob's Red Mill

Recipes we love using hemp seeds:

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Soy Protein Bars F

Fuel Your Awesomeness with These Protein Bars

by Cassidy Stockton in Gluten Free, Recipes

These protein bars are a delicious way to fuel up before a big hike/run/ski/whatever or to use as recovery fuel from said activities. These are not diet bars or low cab treats, these are fuel and should be treated as such. In our opinion, fuel should taste good. We aren’t fans of the “food is fuel, just get it in” mentality. Food is just one of many tools at your disposal to keep your body working and we think it should taste good while doing so. After all, if it tastes good and you feel satisfied, you’re less likely to choose high calorie, nutritionally deplete options.

When made according to this recipe, these bars remind me of halva- that decadent sesame treat common in the Middle East. I’d imagine these beat the pants of halva nutritionally and will keep you going longer. When choosing fuel, each bite should work toward keeping your body and brain in tip-top condition, why not choose something that tastes good too?

Protein Bars | Bob's Red Mill

Protein Bars

We chose to use peanut butter and our soy protein powder in this recipe, but you can chose a different nut butter or different protein powder for similar results.

Line an 8×4-inch baking pan with waxed paper and set aside. In a bowl, combine peanut butter, water, maple syrup and vanilla extract. Stir until smooth. Add oat flour, rolled oats, protein powder and flaxseed meal. Mix until combined. Dough will be dry and crumbly. Press evenly into the bottom of the pan and set aside. In a bowl in the microwave or small saucepan on the stove top, gently heat chocolate chips until melted, taking care not to burn. Pour melted chocolate over oat layer and smooth with a spatula to cover evenly.  Sprinkle almonds over the top and press gently into chocolate layer. Transfer baking dish to the refrigerator or freezer until chocolate sets, about 10 minutes. Run a knife around the inside edge of the dish and use the waxed or parchment paper to lift out of the pan. Cut into bars with a sharp knife. Makes 6 bars.

 Nutrition Facts: Each bar contains: Calories: 230, Calories from Fat: 90, Total Fat 10g, Saturated Fat 2.5g, Cholesterol: 0mg, Sodium: 95mg, Total Carbohyrdates: 24g, Dietary Fiber: 4g, Sugars: 9g, Protein: 11g. 

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Chia Seeds BRM

How-to Replace Eggs and Fat in Recipes with Flax and Chia

by Sarah House in Health, Recipes

When the calendar flips over to a new year, we are often driven to change things up for the better. Quit some things, start doing others, improve what we’re doing and do it better. More often than not, these changes often involve some tweak to the food you eat. Maybe it’s the excess of the holidays that drive us to want to eat healthier, but I think there is something about a new year that makes us want to be better than we were. A chance to start over.

If some major changes are underway for your diet (say you’re going vegan or cutting back on fat or cholesterol) seeds are an excellent substitute for many animal-based proteins commonly used in baking and can increase the nutritional value of your baked good. Simple, easy swaps for a healthier you.

Flax

Eggs are easily replaced with Flaxseed Meal or Chia Seeds, which is a great way to reduce cholesterol or transition towards a plant-based diet.  Use either of the substitutions below and, after they’ve had a chance to sit for 5 minutes, add the whole mixture just as you would the eggs in a recipe.  Just remember that seeds won’t provide leavening power like egg whites.  So, if your recipe is devoid of yeast or chemical leaven (baking powder or soda) or heavy on the eggs, try adding ¼ – ½ tsp of baking powder or soda to your recipe.

1 egg = 2 tsp Chia Seeds + ¼ cup water (let sit for 5 minutes)

1 egg = 1 Tbsp brown or golden Flaxseed Meal + 3 Tbsp water (let sit for 5 minutes)

If you are looking to cut back on fats, use the ratio of 3 parts Flaxseed Meal to replace 1 part fat.  Chia Seeds work, too, but in a slightly different ratio (explained below).  Now, you won’t want to replace ALL of the fat.  Fat is an important factor in flavor, mouthfeel, and helping you feel full.  You don’t want to eat three fat-free (but still sugary) cookies and feel unsatisfied when one cookie with at least half the fat would have done the trick!  So any time you plan on substituting fat, only sub half.

Chia seeds1 Tbsp fat = 3 Tbsp brown or golden Flaxseed Meal + 1 Tbsp Water (let sit for 5 minutes)

1 Tbsp fat = ½ tsp Chia Seeds + 1 Tbsp water (let sit for 15 minutes)

Yes, the volumes of these fat subs aren’t identical but the thickening abilities of the seeds even out with these amounts.  Substituting these seed mixtures for fat often causes baked goods to brown more rapidly and most success has been found with recipes which contain small amounts of fat such as muffins and pancakes.  You may want to experiment with reducing the baking temperature by 25°F and increasing the baking time.  If the crust starts to darken too fast, tent the top with tin foil.

One thing you don’t want to do is substitute BOTH the eggs and fat in a recipe with all seeds.  You will most definitely NOT end up with something close to what you were expecting.  Instead, use the seed swap for eggs and rely on other fat substitutes like applesauce or pureed banana, avocado or prunes.

If you’re happy with your egg and fat consumption, you can still incorporate seeds into your baked goods for some major health bonuses and some great new flavor and texture profiles!

Flaxseed Meal can replace 10 – 20% of the total flour in a recipe.  If you want more texture and opt for whole Flax Seeds, combine them with the liquid called for in the recipe and let the whole thing sit for 30 minutes first.  Baking with Flaxseed Meal can make the texture of an item chewier and sometimes a bit dry.  If you find that to be the case, add a bit of extra liquid next time.

Not only are Chia Seeds an excellent and more nutritious substitute for poppy seeds but they also act as a great food extender that lowers calories and doesn’t affect the flavor!  Use a ratio of one part chia seeds (you may grind them after measuring if you want) to nine parts water.  Let this mixture stand for 10 minutes and then use in your favorite soups, smoothies, dips or spreads.  The exact amount of gel to use depends on the specific recipe you are using so adjust to your liking.  This mixture keeps, refrigerated, for up to two weeks.

Seeds are so much more than a last-minute garnish or muffin mix-in.  Alongside all the unique flavors and textures, Chia and Flax boost nutrition and spark tons of creativity in the kitchen.  Have fun!

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Sarah House Google: Sarah House
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5 {Easy} Ways to Add Flax to Your Diet

by Cassidy Stockton in Whole Grains 101

Flaxseed is considered to be a super food for two main reasons- it delivers quality plant-based omega-3 fatty acids and ground flaxseeds (as opposed to the oil) are a good source of dietary fiber. There are many other wonderful health properties that are attributed to flax, but we’re not doctors and you can read the claims elsewhere- like this great WebMD article. If you want to know more about flax, read our What is it? Wednesday post. I’m not really here today to tell why should include flax in your diet. No, I’m here to tell you just how easy it is to include flax. We’ll assume you already want to eat more flax.

5 {Easy} Ways to Add Flax to Your Diet | Bob's Red Mill
Here are five simple, easy and DELICIOUS ways to make sure you get a little more flax in your life.

1. Drink it down- version 1. Okay, this one might not be all that delicious, but I can tell you that it is a common practice in our office and you can see this method being used on any given day here because it’s easy and it gets the job done. Here’s what you do- pick your beverage of choice- we recommend water or juice and mix in 1 to 2 tablespoons of flax. Just mix it up and drink it down. Don’t let it sit too long or you’ll have a very thick drink. Yes, kind of unappealing, but if you just want to get it in, this is a quick and relatively painless way to do it.

2. Drink it down-version 2. This is my preferred method. Add flax to your smoothie. If you don’t have smoothies on the regular, it might be a fun way to mix up your breakfast routine. We put together 10 of our favorites in this post if you need some inspiration.

5 {Easy} Ways to Add Flax to Your Diet | Bob's Red Mill
3. Mix it with your oatmeal. Or any hot cereal really. Just add your flaxseed meal after you’re finished cooking. It adds a nutty flavor that won’t overpower the dish. If you like your hot cereals with sugar, you’ll probably never even notice the flax.

4. Add it to your baked goods. This is a great option for those of you who want to eat more flax, but don’t like the flavor and/or texture. Muffins (pictured below), quick breads, pancakes, brownies, cookies, bread– nearly anything can take a little flax without altering the flavor and texture of your baked good. To get started, I recommend following a tried and true recipe, like these Date and Apricot Muffins from Spiced or these Blueberry Banana Muffins from The Lemon Bowl. The only downside of eating flax this way is that you’re not guaranteed to get a full serving with each serving of the baked good. The upside is that you won’t notice the flax. Heck, your picky kid probably won’t notice the flax (although I’m convinced mine would notice if I breathe funny on his food). You can feel better about eating said baked good and know that you are getting the benefit of flaxseed. *You can also use flax to replace eggs. We’ll dive in deeper on this topic tomorrow.

5 {Easy} Ways to Add Flax to Your Diet | Bob's Red Mill

5. On Toast. This is a funny one that a customer recommended to me a long time ago and, once I tried it, I was hooked. It’s definitely my second favorite way to enjoy flax. Slather a piece of toast (although it could really work with any bread-like substance from muffins to pancakes), with honey, peanut butter, jam, whatever as long as it’s sweet and/or flavor masking, sprinkle flax on top, mix it in a little bit and chow down. A good multi-grain bread with peanut butter and honey is my go-to. The bread and the topping cover most of the flavor and texture.

That’s it. Five easy ways to get more flax in your diet. For recipes and inspiration, visit our recipe collection at bobsredmill.com or check out our Super Seeds board on Pinterest. Be sure to check back later in the week to find out how to use flax to replace eggs and fat in your baked goods.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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The 10 Best Smoothies Ever

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Smoothies seem to be all the rage these days and for good reason. They’re easy to make (all you need is a decent blender), easy to consume (talk about portable!) and endlessly customizable.  If you want protein, add protein powder- hemp, whey, soy– and/or nut butters. If you want more fiber, oat bran, flax and chia are wonderful additions. Fruit, nut butters, coconut, wheat bran, avocado, pumpkin… you name it, it can probably be added to a smoothie. Green smoothies are a fun way to sneak more greens into your diet (and kids might find it fun, too). With the right ingredients, smoothies can be a meal unto themselves.

We’ve gathered together 10 of our favorite combinations to spur your creativity in the kitchen. A few things to keep in mind:

  • We’ve called out particular protein powders for each recipe, all of these can be made with any of our plain, unsweetened protein powders.
  • Any of these can be made with your choice of milk, no matter what we say in the ingredients.
  • When we call for coconut milk, we mean something like Silk Coconut Milk, not canned coconut milk.

The 10 Best Smoothies Ever | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free

The 10 Best Smoothies Ever | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free The 10 Best Smoothies Ever | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten freeThe 10 Best Smoothies Ever | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free The 10 Best Smoothies Ever | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Hemp Protein Truffles | Bob's Red Mill

Hemp Protein Truffles

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

When I was handed my first protein truffle a few weeks ago, I was hesitant. We were in the heyday of Christmas sweets and another truffle, especially one that boasted protein powder, wasn’t that appealing. But, I took one for the team and am I ever glad I did.

You probably wouldn’t want to sit down to a whole plate of these, but they are tasty and deliver approximately 2 grams of complete protein (from the hemp protein powder) and 3 grams of dietary fiber per truffle. This is a great way to get more protein and fiber for people who aren’t into smoothies and need a little extra boost. These truffles would be a fabulous treat/snack to take along when you’re on the go and make a perfect post-workout recovery snack.

This recipe uses our Hemp Protein Powder, but you can use any plain protein powder (such as our whey or soy protein powders) you like in this recipe with good results. I recommend staying away from flavored powders, as they may be too sweet to use in this recipe.

Hemp Protein Truffles | Bob's Red Mill

Hemp Protein Truffles

  • ¼ cup chopped Medjool Dates (about 7 dates)
  • ¼ cup Bob’s Red Mill Hemp Protein Powder
  • 2 Tbsp Rolled Oats
  • 1 Tbsp Coconut Flour
  • ¼ cup Milk or Non-Dairy Milk Alternative
  • 2 Tbsp Maple Syrup
  • 2/3 cup Dark Chocolate Chips
  • 2 Tbsp Coconut Oil

Line a small dish with waxed paper and set aside. In a food processor, combine dates, protein powder, oats, coconut flour, milk and maple syrup.  Process until a smooth paste forms, stopping and scraping down the sides as needed. Portion the mixture into 10 pieces, about 1 Tbsp each, and shape into balls; set aside. In a small saucepan, combine chocolate and coconut oil.  Heat over medium-low until the chocolate has melted, stirring to combine well. Remove the mixture from the heat and let cool about 5 minutes. Using a fork, lower each truffles into the chocolate mixture to coat. Let any excess chocolate drip off before transferring the finished truffle to the prepared dish. Transfer the dish to the freezer until the chocolate sets, about 20 minutes. Makes 10 truffles.

Each truffle contains: Calories: 150, Calories from Fat: 60, Total Fat: 7g, Saturated Fat: 4.5g, Cholesterol: 0mg, Sodium: 10mg, Total Carbohydrates: 24g, Dietary Fiber: 3g, Sugars: 19g, Protein: 2g. 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Chia

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

Our first WIW for the New Year is Chia! Chia is definitely one of the trendiest ingredients out there right now and can be found in everything from baked goods to smoothies. First off, if you know what chia is, congratulations- you’re ahead of the curve. For the rest of us, let’s dive in deeper and see what the fuss is all about.

What is it? Chia is a small seed that originated in Mexico and Central America. The seeds range from white to black and are about the size of a poppy seed. Chia seeds were used by Aztec warriors to increase their endurance during travel.

Why would you eat it? Chia seed contains a wealth of fiber—5 grams in just one tablespoon. It is the fiber in chia that causes chia seed to swell when combined with water, creating chia gel. Whether you eat chia gel or just the raw seeds, the hydrophilic action of chia seed will keep you full longer than many other seeds. Chia also delivers a healthy amount of Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids- approximately 2282 mg of Omega-3 per tablespoon. If those aren’t good enough reasons to eat chia, then we don’t know what are.

What is it? Wednesday: Chia | Bob's Red Mill

How do you use it? Chia seed is incredibly versatile. You can add it to baked goods, sprinkle it on salads, mix it in smoothies and enjoy it with hot cereal. Because of chia’s ability to make a thick gel when combined with water, chia works well in place of eggs in many recipes and can act as a binder when a little more adhesion is needed- think burgers and meatloaf. Chia’s incredible ability to thicken can be used to create vegan puddings and quick-jams with fantastic results.

How do you make chia gel? To make chia gel, combine 1 tablespoon of chia with 1/2 cup water and let sit for about 15-20 minutes. You will be amazed at how thick the gel will become. Drinking/eating this combo is a great way to enjoy chia and get the benefits of this powerhouse seed.

How do you replace an egg with chia? Chia is a wonderful substitute for eggs in quick breads, cookies and pancakes. To replace one egg, combine 1 tablespoon of chia with 3 tablespoons of water and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes. Add to the recipe as you would an egg.

Can you eat it raw? Yes, chia is best eaten raw.

Can you eat it whole? Yes, unlike flax, whole chia seed can be broken down by the body and digested. It does not need to be ground.

Is it vegan? Yes, chia seed is vegan.

What is it? Wednesday: Chia | Bob's Red Mill

Is Bob’s Red Mill Chia Seed gluten free? No, while chia is naturally free from gluten, we do not produce chia in our gluten free facility or batch test it for gluten.

Finally, is this the same seed they sell with Chia Pets? Yes, it is the same seed, but ours is food-grade quality. We don’t recommend eating anything that came with a chia pet, but you could use our seeds to grown your own chia pet. True story: a customer washed some chia down the drain. A few weeks later the sink was backed up. When the plumber opened the catch, our customer had chia seed growing in her pipes. No joke. Safe to say, you should probably not put extra chia down the drain. The compost? That’s an ideal place for leftover chia gel.

Recipes we love using Chia:

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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