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5 Whole Grain Dishes to Step Up Your Potluck Game

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Memorial Day seems to be the official opening day of barbecue and picnic season. What’s better than bringing together those you love over some delicious food? And what’s more fun than serving something that shows off your culinary chops? Sure, potato salad and pasta salad are perennial favorites and not overly difficult to put together. Wouldn’t it be more satisfying to bring a dish that isn’t filled with empty carbs and mayonnaise that everyone raves about? Health benefits aside, you know you will likely be the only person who brought something remarkable and different. Here are a few whole grain swaps you can make to step up your potluck game.

1. Instead of potato salad, bring Warm Kamut® Berry Salad with Bacon, Brussels Sprouts and Gorgonzola. Sure, this salad is a little time-consuming to make, but so is potato salad (unless you’re opting for a prepared version). Gorgonzola and bacon bring their A-game in this dish, while whole grain kamut berries and Brussels sprouts team up for a well-rounded dish that everyone will enjoy. If you can’t keep it hot, don’t worry, warm will be lovely and you won’t have to worry about any mayonnaise turning. If you can’t find kamut berries, wheat berries and farro will both make a comparable replacement.Warm Kamut Berry Salad with Bacon Brussels Sprouts and Gorgonzola

2. Swap a antipasto salad for Vegetable Bounty Quinoa Salad with Asian Vinaigrette. Far more nutritious than pasta, quinoa packs a nutritional punch and the flavors in this salad are warm and bright, perfect for pairing for a spring gathering.

Vegetable Bounty Sm

3.  Trade a pasta salad dressed with mayonnaise for this Curried Carrot and Sorghum Salad. The creamy curry dressing is both gluten free and vegan, making it perfect for any gathering and will quickly put mayo out of mind.

Curried Carrots and Sorghum Salad

4. Sure, a green salad is a great way to go, but wouldn’t it be more fun to bring Tabbouleh? Filled with fresh tomatoes and seasoned with mint and parsley, Tabbouleh comes together quickly and delivers a light, fresh flavor perfect to pair with grilled chicken or fish.

Tabbouleh

5. Keep it fresh and light with this Millet Spring Roll Salad. Who cares what you swap for this one? The bright flavors of this dish will counterbalance other, heavier fare and you’ll be able to school people on what millet is and impress them with your culinary prowess. Who has the time to make real spring rolls when you can turn them into a delicious salad?

Millet Spring Roll Salad

 

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Meatless Mondays: Kamut® Berries with Herbed Mushrooms and Leeks

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

This whole grain, pilaf-like dish shines the spotlight on Kamut® berries. The toothsome grains marry beautifully with earthy mushrooms and vibrant leeks. Beyond cooking the grains, this dish comes together easily and is a great, light meal for a Monday night. Take it up a notch with a sprinkling of freshly grated Parmesan and pair with a green salad.

Kamut w Herbed Mushrooms and Leeks | Bob's Red Mill

Kamut® Berries with Herbed Mushrooms and Leeks

from Whole Grains Every Day by Bob’s Red Mill 

  • 1-1/2 cups Bob’s Red Mill Organic Kamut® Berries
  • 4-1/2 cups Water
  • 2 Tbsp Unsalted Butter*
  • 3 cups sliced Leeks, white and light green parts
  • 1-1/2 lb assorted Mushrooms, trimmed and quartered
  • ¼ tsp Sea Salt
  • 1 cup low-sodium Vegetable Broth
  • 1 Tbsp fresh Tarragon, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp fresh Thyme, chopped
  • Salt and Black Pepper, to taste

Bring water to a boil in a medium pot.

Add Kamut® berries, cover, reduce heat to simmer and cook until berries are tender and plump, about 45-60 minutes. Drain off any excess water and set kamut aside.

Heat the butter in a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat until it foams. Add the leeks and cook, stirring frequently, until they soften, 4-5 minutes. Add mushrooms and salt. Continue cooking until the mushrooms release their liquid and are just short of tender, 7-10 minutes.

Stir in broth, tarragon, thyme, cooked kamut, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook uncovered over medium heat until some of the liquid has evaporated and the flavors mingle, about 5 minutes.

Serve warm.

*Use a non-dairy margarine for a vegan version.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Bulgur

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, What is it? Wednesday

What is it? Wednesday: BulgurWe are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

Bulgur, the quintessential ingredient in Tabbouleh, is a fabulous and easy way to incorporate whole grains into your diet. Originating primarily in the Middle East, bulgur can be found on menus across the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe. It’s a simple ingredient that can be dressed up or served simply depending on the occasion and, behind oatmeal, one of the best “gateway” grains for most people’s forays into whole grain cooking.

What is it? Quite simply, bulgur is wheat that has been parboiled and cracked. Most often it’s made from durum wheat, but can also be made from hard red wheat and soft white wheat. We offer two varieties- one made from the hard red wheat and one from the soft white wheat – we call them Bulgur and Golden (Light) Bulgur, respectively. Because it is essentially just wheat, bulgur does contain gluten. If you must avoid gluten, try whole grain millet or kasha for a similar texture and flavor.

How do you use it? What we love about bulgur is its incredible versatility. A great “starter” recipe for bulgur is our Tabbouleh recipe found on the package. It’s simple to prepare and has a lovely balance of flavors between the nutty wheat, tangy tomatoes and hint of mint. Bulgur can be used in salads, soups, casseroles and pilafs, as well as added to baked goods for a nutty crunch. Try these Lemon Bulgur Poundcakes for a real treat! This Bulgur Asparagus Salad is one of our favorites and a great way to enjoy the bounty of spring. Bulgur can be used in place of meat in casseroles, as it has a chewy texture that replicates ground beef quite nicely. Add it to meatballs and meatloaf to stretch the dish and boost the whole grain content.

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Vegan Alfredo | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Mondays: Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Dairy-Free Alfredo

by Claire Gallam in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

You haven’t really lived until you’ve had homemade gnocchi. I know that seems like a bold statement, but that’s just how strongly I feel about the matter. Homemade gnocchi will blow your store-bought stuff right out of the water.

Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Vegan Alfredo | Bob's Red Mill

I was so excited when Bob’s Red Mill asked me to create a healthy and wholesome meal using one of their nut flours. Since I’ve been trying to limit the amount of processed food I eat, I’ve been living off pastas, breads, muffins and cakes made with almond meal. Not only does it add such an incredible nuttiness to your dishes, it also adds a punch of protein too.  I knew almost instantly what I was going to make, a version of the root vegetable homemade gnocchi featured in my cookbook.

Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Vegan Alfredo | Bob's Red Mill

Regular potato gnocchi is fabulous, but I have to say, I wanted something with a little more vibrancy, so I opted for roasted and pureed butternut squash. It’s creamy and flavorful, and adds a beautiful bright orange color to the pasta. Plus, it gives you a serving of vegetables in each bite, which is an added bonus in my life.

Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Vegan Alfredo | Bob's Red Mill

I paired these fluffy little pasta dumplings with my favorite vegan Alfredo sauce. You’ll absolutely die when you see what makes it so creamy! This gnocchi and sauce is the best weeknight or weekend meal. Your family and friends will go gaga, I promise.

Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Vegan Alfredo | Bob's Red Mill

Roasted Butternut Squash Gnocchi with Vegan Alfredo

Serves about 4

Ingredients:

For the Gnocchi:

For the sauce:

  • 1 pound Extra Firm Tofu
  • 1/3 cup Soy or Almond Milk
  • 1 ½ tablespoons chopped Basil
  • 1/3 cup Soy Parmesan
  • 3 tablespoons Vegan Butter

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, mix the squash, flour, almond meal, egg, Parmesan cheese and salt and pepper. Mix until pasta dough comes together. If it’s still too sticky, add additional all purpose flour.
  2. Place the dough onto a hard floured surface and knead until smooth and elastic. Roll the dough into ¼ inch thickness and cut into 4 even sections. Cut each bite into 1 ½ inch pieces. Press the back of the fork into the gnocchi to make indents.
  3. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add salt. Cook the gnocchi until softened and floating to the top, about 4 – 6 minutes.  Rinse and set aside.
  4. Meanwhile, make the sauce by blending the tofu, almond milk, basil, Parmesan and vegan butter together in a blender. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Pour the sauce over the gnocchi and serve with additional pepper.

*Use Soy Parmesan to make this dish completely vegan.

Claire GallamClaire is a cookbook author, food writer and recipe creator, soon-to-be culinary student and avid world traveler. She is recently married to a social media guru who loves *almost* everything she conjures up. She writes full-time for the Food section of SheKnows, FabulousFoods.com and is a contributing writer for the Travel section of SheKnows. You can also follow her daily musings and find delicious healthy recipes on her food blog, The Realistic Nutritionist. Follow Claire on Twitter and Facebook to keep up to date with her newest creations. 

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Claire Gallam Google: Claire Gallam
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Meatless Mondays: Cherry Date Bars

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Inspired by Power Hungry by Camilla Saulsbury and our love of certain kind of fruit and nut bar, our test kitchen came up with these lovely Cherry Date Bars. They’re easy to make and are perfect for an on-the-go breakfast, tucking into lunch boxes and pre-workout (or recovery) fuel. I love that the sugar comes purely from the fruit. The sweet tartness of the cherries pairs beautifully with hazelnuts and cinnamon, making them almost dessert-like without adding any extra sugar. Make a batch and wrap them individually for easy grabbing throughout the week. If you like these as much as we do, we cannot recommend the Power Hungry cookbook enough- it’s absolutely packed with fabulous recipes for every kind of bar you could envision.

Cherry Date Bars | Bob's Red Mill

Cherry Date Bars

Contributed by:  Sarah House

Prep Time: 20 minutes | Chill Time:  30 minutes | Yield: 6 servings

  • 1 cup Tart Dried Cherries (120g)
  • ¼ cup Date Pieces (36g)
  • 1 cup Hot Water (240 mL)
  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Hazelnut Meal (112g)
  • ¼ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp Salt
  • 1/8 tsp Almond Extract
  • ¼ cup coarsely chopped, toasted Hazelnuts (30g)

Step 1

Combine cherries, dates and water and let soak until soft, about 5 – 10 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, line a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap or waxed paper.

Step 3

Drain the water from the soaked fruit and discard.  Place the drained fruit, hazelnut meal, cinnamon, salt, almond extract and chopped hazelnuts in a food processor.  Process until well combined, about 1 minute.

Step 4

Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan.  Cover with a piece plastic wrap or waxed paper and press down to flatten to a smooth, even thickness.

Step 5

Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.  Remove from pan, discard plastic wrap and cut into 6 equal-sized bars.  Store covered.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Arrowroot Starch

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

Welcome to What is it? Wednesday! This week’s topic is Arrowroot Starch, AKA: Arrowroot Powder, Arrowroot Flour. A lesser-known ingredient than its starch brethren—corn, potato, tapioca—arrowroot is an incredibly useful ingredient that is often overlooked. It is frequently used in gluten free and allergy-free baking. Use it in place of cornstarch in baking, or for thickening cool liquids (read: ice cream). If you have questions we don’t address, leave them in the comments and I’ll do my best to find you an answer.

What is it? Wednesday: Arrowroot Starch | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Arrowroot starch is a very fine, white powder akin to cornstarch made from the tubers of the arrowroot plant. The arrowroot plant, Maranta arundinacea, is a perennial herb found in tropical climates. The origins of its name are a little mysterious. One source claims that the Arawak Indians called the plant aru-aru, “meal of meals.” While another claims that arrowroot was used medicinally, being placed on wounds made with poisoned arrows to draw out the toxins. With its medicinal properties, it might just be a little of both.

How do you use it? Like other starches, arrowroot starch is used as a thickening agent in liquids and supports proteins in baking to give baked goods form. It has virtually no flavor and is allergy-friendly, making it a great option for those avoiding corn, potatoes or gluten in general.

Arrowroot does not hold its thickening abilities like other starches and is best added near the end of heating. It should be mixed with liquid to create a slurry before adding to hot liquids to prevent clumping. There is a secret to a smooth sauce with arrowroot starch. Bring the sauce base to a simmer over medium-low heat. Next, whisk ¼ cup water and 2 Tbsp. arrowroot starch together to make a slurry. Stir the slurry into the simmering sauce and heat for one minute or until thickened.

How is it different from other starches? First off, arrowroot starch does not turn sauces cloudy like some starches, and it works at temperatures below a simmer. Arrowroot starch is neutral tasting and tolerates acidic ingredients, such as citrus (hello, lemon curd!). The starch also freezes well and dissolves well at lower temperatures. In fact, it must be cooked over low heat as it doesn’t endure high temperature cooking and does not reheat well. A final word to the wise, arrowroot does not do well in milk-based cream sauces (it changes the texture), but it bakes well in cakes, cookies and biscuits made with milk.

Sweet Potato-Almond Waffles with Crispy Oven-Baked Cornflake Chicken | Bob's Red Mill & Cara's Cravings

Try one of these fabulous recipes using Arrowroot Starch:

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Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

Quick and easy-to-prepare, these Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies are a satisfying way to enjoy a treat while following a low carbohydrate diet. I’ve personally made them to take along on road trips for my family to provide a protein-rich snack that also cures the siren call of a sweet tooth. When you think of the many bars you can purchase, these cookies are a pretty solid way to enjoy fueling up.

Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Hazelnut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Contributed by:  Amanda Carter

Prep Time: 10 minutes | Cook Time:  15 – 18 minutes | Yield: 20 cookies

  • 1 Tbsp Flaxseed Meal (7g)
  • 3 Tbsp Water (45mL)
  • 1 cup Hazelnut Meal (112g)
  • ½ cup Coconut Sugar (64g)
  • ½ tsp Baking Soda
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • ¾ cup Almond Butter (204g)
  • ½ cup Applesauce (112g)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ cup Dark Chocolate Chips (100g)

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Step 2

Mix flaxseed meal and water together in a small bowl and set aside to thicken.

Step 3

In a medium bowl, whisk together Bob’s Red Mill Hazelnut Meal, coconut sugar, baking soda and salt.

Step 4

In a large bowl, mix together almond butter, applesauce, vanilla extract and flax/water mixture.  Add dry ingredients to wet and mix well then stir in chocolate chips.

Step 5

Place approximately 1 ½ Tbsp (20g) of dough per cookie on the prepared baking sheet, leaving 1-inch between each cookie.  Bake until set, 15 – 18 minutes.

Step 6

Remove from the oven and let the cookies cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes, then move to a rack and let cool completely.

Each cookie contains: Calories 130, Calories from Fat 90, Total Fat 10g (15%), Saturated Fat 1.5g (8%), Trans Fat 0g, Cholesterol 0mg (0%), Sodium 85mg (4%), Total Carbohydrate 10g (3%), Dietary Fiber 2g (8%), Sugars 6g, Protein 3g, Vitamin A 0%, Vitamin C 2%, Calcium 4%, Iron 4%.

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New Product: Gluten Free Scottish Oatmeal {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles, Gluten Free

If you’re familiar with Bob’s Red Mill, you probably already know how much we love Scotland. Maybe it’s a kinship we feel with a country that is almost always rainy and cool (much like our beloved Oregon) or maybe we love it for birthing our favorite food, oatmeal. Maybe it’s because they awarded us the title of World Porridge Champions in 2009, or maybe it’s because they’re just so darn nice over there. No matter what is at the heart of it, Bob has always loved Scotland and, after a visit many years ago, his love fueled the creation of our Scottish Oatmeal. It was in Scotland that Bob first tasted and fell in love with traditional Scottish oats.

NEW GF Scottish Oatmeal | Bob's Red Mill

Ground on stone mills, this oatmeal is a true meal. It is smooth and creamy with a texture closer to farina than what we typically associate with oatmeal. It’s not chewy like rolled or steel cut oats, but it still has a bit of bite and texture. This isn’t gruel, but it is a unique breakfast experience.

The Gilgamesh | Bob's Red Mill

We have yet to find anything in the States that compares to our Scottish Oatmeal, which is why we are very excited to add Gluten Free Scottish Oatmeal to our robust gluten free oat line. We take the same high-quality, gluten free tested and verified oats that you know and trust and run them through our specialized stone mills in our gluten free facility to create a new, whole grain cereal perfect for warming you up on these brisk *almost* spring days.

To celebrate our new addition and our undying love for Scotland, we’re giving away a package of Gluten Free Scottish Oatmeal to five lucky winners. To enter, follow the prompts below. We’ll select five winners at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 04/08/14.

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Meatless Mondays: Curried Sweet Potato & Millet Soup {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook by Judith Finlayson is a fabulous resource of whole grain recipes that anyone can enjoy. What I love about this book is that it’s a book about grains that are inherently gluten free (amaranth, buckwheat, corn, millet, oats, quinoa, rice, sorghum, teff, wild rice) without focusing on what is missing from the dishes. Think of it as a celebration of the myriad other grains beyond wheat, rye and barley. Some of the best grains on the planet are free from gluten. 

The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook by Judith Finlayson

Finlayson has a history with vegetarian and slow cooker cookbooks and she brings this experience to the gluten free realm. The recipes are approachable, even if they sound hard like Moroccan-style Millet Stuffing and Coconut-Spiked Pork with Quinoa and Peanuts. All of the recipes come with tips for ways to simplify or elaborate the recipe and many come with variations for making the dish vegetarian. The majority of the dishes are accompanied by beautiful photography and they all have nutritional breakdowns which is a huge bonus and not something most cookbooks offer.

From breakfast to dessert, this book has it all. Finlayson kicks off The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook with a thorough guide to whole grains. She covers their history, how to store them, how to buy them and the nutrition they bring to your table. Needless to say, we love this book.

The generous folks at Robert Rose Publishing have offered us a single copy to give away to one lucky reader. We’ll pair this book with a package of amaranth, millet, quinoa, teff and sorghum to get you started. This is a fun whole grains gift set that anyone- gluten free or otherwise- will certainly enjoy. To enter, follow the prompts in the app at the bottom of this post. We’ll pick a winner at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 3/31/14. Winners must be over 18 and are limited to US and Canadian residents only.  To pick up a copy of the book now, visit your favorite book retailer or Amazon.com

Curried Sweet Potato and Millet Soup | Bob's Red Mill

Curried Sweet Potato and Millet Soup

VEGAN FRIENDLY

This soup is a lovely combination of flavors and texture. It has a mild curry taste, enhanced with the addition of orange and a hint of sweetness from the maple syrup. The toasted walnuts add taste and an appealing bit of crunch, while the optional yogurt provides a creamy finish. Although this is a great cold weather soup, it’s light enough to be enjoyed any time of the year — perhaps even for dinner with the addition of salad.

Tips

To get this quantity of puréed sweet potato, bake, peel and mash 2 medium sweet potatoes, each about 6 oz (175 g). You can also use a can (14 oz/398 mL) sweet potato purée.

Toasting brings out millet’s pleasantly nutty flavor. To toast, heat in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it crackles and releases its aroma, for 5 minutes.

  • 1 Tbsp Vegetable Oil (15 mL)
  • 2 Onions, finely chopped
  • 2 Carrots, peeled and diced
  • 2 stalks Celery, diced
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp minced Ginger Root (10 mL)
  • 2 tsp Curry Powder (10 mL)
  • 1 tsp freshly grated Orange Zest (5 mL)
  • 2 cups Sweet Potato Purée (500 mL)
  • 6 cups Vegetable Stock (1.5 L)
  • 3⁄4 cup Millet, toasted (175 mL)
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed Orange Juice (250 mL)
  • 1⁄4 cup pure Maple Syrup (60 mL)
  • Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper
  •  Toasted chopped Walnuts or sliced Almonds
  • Plain Yogurt, optional

1.    In a large saucepan or stockpot, heat oil over medium heat for 30 seconds. Add onions, carrots and celery and cook, stirring, until carrots have softened, about 7 minutes.

2.    Add garlic, ginger, curry powder and orange zest and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add sweet potato and stock and stir well. Bring to a boil. Stir in millet. Reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer until millet is tender and flavors have blended, about 30 minutes.

3.    Add orange juice and maple syrup and heat through. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle into bowls and garnish with toasted walnuts and a drizzle of yogurt, if using.

Makes 6 servings

Excerpted from The Complete Gluten-Free Whole Grains Cookbook by Judith Finlayson © 2013 Robert Rose Inc. www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with publisher permission.

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Hazelnut Meal/Flour

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, What is it? Wednesday

We are very excited to bring you What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

I bet you didn’t even know there was such a thing as Hazelnut Meal. Almond Meal is endlessly popular and seems there is a flour/meal for every nut now (no pun intended). We’ve been milling hazelnut meal for quite a while, 10 years to be exact, but, until recently, it was relatively unknown. As low carbohydrate and paleo diets gain in popularity, there seems to be a need for more variety in ingredients, and we’re here to oblige.

Hazelnuts | Bob's Red Mill

What is it, exactly? It’s quite simply, hazelnuts that have been ground into a meal. The nature of nut flours is such that you get some very fine pieces and some slightly larger pieces. Overall, the product is quite fine, but it is not as fine as a wheat flour, hence the term “meal” is used often to describe this product. We leave the skins intact, so you get the whole nutrition that hazelnuts (also known as filberts) offer.  Hazelnut meal is a gluten free flour with no real starch of which to speak. Whole grains are composed of three parts, one of which is primarily starch and protein (endosperm). This piece of the grain is what comprises white flour. Nuts are a whole different story. They have a considerably lower proportion of carbohydrates and starch than a grain does. Making them great for low carb diets, but not so great for baking in the way that we typically think of it.

Why would you use Hazelnut Meal? There are many reasons, but they break down into a few broad groups.

  1. You are a baker looking for a decadent addition to your baked goods.
  2. You are gluten free and looking for a way to boost the nutritional content of your baked goods.
  3. You are following a low carbohydrate diet or some variety- be it for weight loss or diabetes management.Hazelnut Meal | Bob's Red Mill

How do you use it? You can use it the same way you would almond meal. I’m going to break it down for folks who might not be familiar with using nut flours in their daily lives. Because hazelnut meal does not contain gluten and is light on starches, it should be used in conjunction with other flours. Our suggestion is to replace no more than 25- 30% of the flour in your recipe with hazelnut meal. This will bring a richness and nutty texture to your baked goods. If you are looking to create baked goods with a low carbohydrate load, it can be used on its own or in conjunction with other flours that will help give it structure. As with coconut flour, we highly recommend using a recipe that is designed for hazelnut meal or almond meal to get started.

It also makes a fantastic coating for proteins like chicken and fish and a great addition to smoothies. For recipe inspiration, look for recipes using almond meal and think outside of the box. Look for places that ask you to grind up hazelnuts and use our flour instead. It’s the same thing, only we do all the work for you and you don’t have to wash your food processor.

Hazelnut Pancakes with Coconut Chocolate Syrup | The Roasted Root

We have some great recipes using hazelnut meal coming up later in the week, but get started using it today with one of these fabulous recipes.

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