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Find Your Inner Goldilocks {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Featured Articles

Happy *almost* February. How are those resolutions panning out? Hanging in there? At Bob’s Red Mill, we love this time of year.  We’ve hit the “reset” button after the holidays and, with a month under our belts, healthy eating and healthy living is starting to feel second nature and not an adventure in foreign cuisine. At least, we hope so. If you still feel like you’re slogging uphill towards your health goals, we’re here to help! 

It’s no joke that breakfast is the cornerstone of any healthy eating lifestyle. A good solid breakfast will fuel your mind and body for whatever road bumps life has to offer. What better way to do that than with one of our whole grain hot cereals? Not only are they jam-packed with whole grain nutrition, they are delicious, too. While many manufacturers pulverize grains into oblivion, only to reconstitute them with added fillers, enrichments, flavors and colors into shapes that look like grains, Bob’s Red Mill keeps it simple. We take a whole grain and break it into a few pieces, then we mix it with other whole grains, seeds and nuts to bring you cereals with exceptional flavor, no tricks or gimmicks—just whole grains, as nature intended.

Porridge with Cherries | Bob's Red Mill

The nutritional benefits of these hot cereals are obvious, but it’s easy to forget when you’re rushing through the morning. Whole grains, these living seeds, are perfectly tuned to human nutrition. They gift us with a wondrous combination of fiber, protein, complex carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. Choosing these cereals over other breakfast offerings will leave you and your family feeling satisfied, nourished and fully charged to face the day.

Real whole grain cereals need cooking—and it’s easy. Our whole grain cereals must be cooked to unlock their nourishing power, and all it takes is a pot of water and a little time. Taking a few minutes in the morning to lovingly prepare a hot, nourishing breakfast can bring back something missing from our busy, modern lives. It can be a time to find a quiet moment in an otherwise chaotic world. Really, what’s 10 minutes out of the 1440 minutes in a day? Instead of choosing a quick-fix breakfast, celebrate the time it takes to cook these whole grains and savor what might be the only quiet time you get all day.

We want to help you find your inner Goldilocks and we’re giving away FIVE hot cereal sets! Winner’s will have their choice of two cereals from our line up of 10 Grain Cereal, 8 Grain Cereal, Organic High Fiber Cereal, Whole Wheat Farina, Brown Rice Farina (GF) and Mighty Tasty Cereal (GF). To enter, simply follow the prompts below. Winners will be chosen at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 2/7/14.


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Birdspotter Recipe of the Week | Bob's Red Mill

Birdseed Stir Fry

by Cassidy Stockton in Birdspotter, Featured Articles, Recipes

For the second year, we’ve teamed up with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to bring bird lovers the ultimate birding photo contest. Each week we’re giving away prizes and sharing some of our favorite recipes, perfect for fueling a healthy, happy day of watching birds. Check back here each week for a great recipe, and don’t forget to vote on your favorites and enter your own photos in BirdSpotter!

***

When most people think of millet, they think of birdseed. After all, it is one of the main components of a wild bird seed blend. Millet is a great seed for certain birds, but Millet is also one of the most nutritious grains available for humans. Unlike most other grains, this versatile, gluten free grain is alkaline, which makes it easy to digest and helps balance the body’s natural tendency towards acidity. Millet is an excellent source of dietary fiber, making it a great solution for those looking to add more fiber to their gluten free diet. The light flavor of millet allows it to be sweet or savory, which means the possibilities are endless. This stir fry is simple, yet satisfying and is a great way to give millet a whirl for the first time.

Birdseed Stir Fry | Bob's Red Mill

Birdseed Stir Fry

  • 1/2 cup Hulled Millet
  • 2 cups Water
  • 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
  • 2 Tbsp Oil
  • 1 cup sliced Onion
  • 2 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp minced fresh Ginger
  • 1 large head of Broccoli, chopped
  • 1 cup sliced Carrot
  • 5 oz canned Water Chestnuts
  • 1/4 cup Cashews, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp Gluten Free Soy Sauce
  • 1 Tbsp Rice Vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp Honey
  • 1 Tbsp Corn Starch

Directions

Step 1

Bring water and salt to a boil. Add millet and return to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for 35 – 40 minutes.

Step 2

Heat oil over medium-high heat in a wok or large pan. Add onion and cook until beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add broccoli, carrots and water chestnut and cook until crisp-tender, 7 – 10 minutes. Add cashews and cooked millet.

Step 3

Combine soy sauce, rice vinegar, honey and cornstarch and pour over vegetables. Cook until dressing is absorbed, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and serve.

Makes 4 servings.

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Flaxseed 101 + Flax Egg Replacer

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Health, What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

We are very excited to bring you What is it Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

While chia seed may be the power seed darling in the media these days, we wanted to remind you about another fabulous power seed—flax seeds! Flax seeds are a wonderful source of omega-3′s offering up 1800 mg per 2 tablespoon serving. They are also a fantastic source of fiber, with a nice blend of insoluble and soluble fiber. 

Flaxseeds and Flaxseed Meal | Bob's Red Mill

Why are omega-3′s important anyway? Omega-3 fatty acids are broken down into three specific acids- ALA (alpha-linolenic acid), DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid). These acids work together to support brain development, the functioning of the immune system, cardiovascular health and are beneficial for healthy skin, hair and nails. How they work together is complicated, but the short version is that our bodies can make EPA and DHA, but cannot make ALA. ALA is the backbone for EPA and DHA, and must be consumed in our food. Read more about the interplay between these acids here.

The conversion of ALA into EPA and DHA is harder for the very young and the elderly, which means people in those categories have to be sure to get enough ALA in the first place. Fish, and their subsequent oil, are one of the most common sources of all three omega-3′s. Sure, that’s great, but that doesn’t work for vegetarians or vegans. Also, have you tried fish oil? Gross. That’s why brands now market lemon and strawberry flavored fish oil so you can eat it and not taste the fish. I love fish, don’t get me wrong, but I’m not a fan of a fish-flavored salad. I digress… There are many plant-based sources of ALA (which, let me remind you, your body will turn into EPA and DHA) including FLAX seeds, chia seed, hemp seeds, sesame seeds, walnuts, and, I just learned today, cauliflower and Brussels sprouts (albeit not as much as the seeds).

Why would you pick flax seeds over any other plant-based source? Flax is an excellent source of dietary fiber. Coupled with the omega-3, the soluble fiber and insoluble fiber work together to absorb and remove cholesterol from the blood stream (healthy heart!) and keep your digestive house neat and tidy. Yes, chia seeds will do that, too, but flax seed is much more affordable and just as effective. You just need to be sure to eat ground flax seed. The flax plant is solely interested in propagating the world with more flax plants, and the human body cannot break down the flax seed. You get virtually no benefit from eating the whole seeds, though they are quite tasty.

flaxseed brochure cover

Luckily for you, Bob’s Red Mill mills whole flax seeds for you. Our flax seed meal is freshly milled using a technology that maintains the cool temperatures needed to keep the oil from oxidizing. I can’t speak for all other brands, but many brands press the oil from the seeds before grinding, so you’re not really getting the whole package as nature intended. We offer several varieties- brown, golden and organic versions of both. The only difference between the two colors is just that, the color. Some prefer the golden for baked goods, as it blends better.

Flaxseed meal is very versatile and is an excellent egg replacer in baked goods (recipe below) and can be sprinkled on salads, hot cereal, smoothies. Some folks around here just mix their 2 tablespoons into water or juice and drink it like an elixir. Personally, I prefer the mixed-in route. We have loads of great recipes for how to incorporate this power house seed into your diet on our website. Be sure to snag a $1.00 off coupon on our homepage, as well.

Flaxseed Meal “Egg”

For one egg, combine 1 Tbsp of Flaxseed Meal with 3 Tbsp of water. Let stand 3-5 minutes. Use as you would an egg in baking. This works best for muffins, quick breads, cookies, pancakes, etc. It is not the best choice for a cake, which relies heavily on eggs for rising or anything that has a fine, delicate texture.

1235C164_FlaxseedMeal_f_HighRes

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macaroni and cheese

Meatless Mondays: Vegan Cheese Sauce + Feeding a Toddler

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Over the last few months, I have been on a journey to figure out what was causing my 15 month old’s seemingly endless bout of eczema. The itchy, dry, red rash covered his whole body and nothing was helping. After multiple visits with his pediatrician, a dermatologist, and an allergist, we were doing a heavy regimen of steroids, lotions and antihistamines. Nothing was working very well and the idea of keeping my little one on steroids and antihistamines indefinitely was NOT on my agenda for his childhood. Finally, I decided to visit a naturopath. I knew that there had to be a deeper reason for this skin issue than “kids just have it.” With her help, we tried a few remedies, starting by removing dairy from his diet, then adding on a probiotic, vitamin D, and a healthy dose of omega-3′s daily.

Within a few weeks, his skin had completely cleared up. We do not know which of the remedies was the most helpful, but, we are not changing a thing. It worked. That’s all that matters. In this line of work, I am not surprised that food interventions coupled with a probiotic and omega-3′s changed his chemistry for the better. I talk to people every day who have seen huge improvements in their health by adding omega-3′s in the form of flax and chia or by removing dairy or gluten. Food is medicine.

macaroni and cheese

All of this is to say that we had a heck of a time figuring out how to feed a toddler when milk is out of the question. Not that he ate a ton of milk-based foods, but string cheese was his favorite snack and macaroni and cheese was a special, much beloved, meal. After buying a box of non dairy mac and cheese (at $4 a pop!), I realized that the “cheese” powder was pretty darn similar to this recipe for “Cheese” Sauce. I thought I’d give it a whirl. It was a big hit over whole wheat macaroni, and worked well for enticing my son to eat broccoli and other veggies. Plus, I like that I can control what is in it. He gets some bonus B-vitamins and (in my house) we replace the margarine with coconut oil to increase the good fats my son is missing out on from not drinking whole milk at this age. While I still haven’t mastered feeding the picky toddler, at least I have some mac and “cheese” to fall back on. 

Nutritional Yeast “Cheese” Sauce

This sauce is great for nachos, vegetables, potatoes, sandwich spread (just a dab), well, just about anywhere you might like some cheesy, saucy goodness. 

Nutritional Yeast

  • 1 tsp Mustard
  • 1/4 cup Margarine, Olive Oil or Coconut Oil
  • 2 cups Cold Water
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/2 cup Unbleached White Flour
  • 1/2 cup Nutritional Yeast

Whisk together in a heavy bottomed sauce pan:

  • 1/2 cup Nutritional Yeast Flakes
  • 1/2 cup Unbleached White Flour
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt

Place pan over medium-high heat and whisk in:

  • 2 cups cold Water

Continue whisking as sauce thickens, bring to a rolling boil, reduce heat, cook 1 minute, remove from heat.

Whisk in:

  • 1/4 cup Margarine or Oil
  • 1 tsp Mustard

Sauce will thicken as it cools, but thins down when heated.

Makes 8 servings.

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Birdspotter Recipe of the Week | Bob's Red Mill

BirdSpotting Granola Bars

by Cassidy Stockton in Birdspotter, Featured Articles, Recipes

For the second year, we’ve teamed up with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology to bring bird lovers the ultimate birding photo contest. Each week we’re giving away prizes and sharing some of our favorite recipes, perfect for fueling a healthy, happy day of watching birds. Check back here each week for a great recipe, and don’t forget to vote on your favorites and enter your own photos in BirdSpotter!

***

These granola bars are so easy to make and so delicious, you’ll wonder why you ever bought all of those packaged granola bars in the first place. With three types of coconut (trust us on this), chocolate chips, dried apricots and dried cherries, it would be easy to mistake these healthy treats for cookies. They are the perfect fuel for a mid-morning snack, a nice treat in a lunch box or a great take-along for birding adventures.  Our bakery makes these every week and they are a favorite of customers and employees, selling out faster than you can say “Blue-Footed Booby.”

BirdSpotter Granola Bars

BirdSpotting Granola Bars

Directions

In a large bowl, mix together the coconut, flour, sugar, baking soda, salt, oats, chocolate chips, apricots, almonds, cherries and seeds.

Mix flaxseed meal and water; let stand for a few minutes.

Combine the molasses, sunflower oil and vanilla. Add the flaxseed meal mixture and mix thoroughly. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and stir to combine. Press dough into a greased 9 x 13-inch baking pan and bake at 350°F for 15 minutes. Let cool before cutting. Makes 32 bars.

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Cannellini Bean Spread | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Mondays: Cannellini Bean Spread

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Christmas is around the corner and that means you likely have company coming to you (or are heading out). Either way, this is a delicious appetizer that works for most dietary restrictions and is sure to please picky palates. This spread goes well with veggies and crackers, and is pretty simple to whip up.  A fabulous alternative to hummus, this spread uses creamy cannellini beans in place of garbanzo beans. The inclusion of carrots adds a subtle sweetness that pairs beautifully with rosemary and thyme. Drizzle with high quality olive oil and you have a classy, different appetizer sure to wow your guests (or hosts).

Note: This time of year, soaking and cooking dried beans might not be feasible, so you can opt to use canned Cannellini beans or even Great Northern beans in this recipe. Freshly cooked beans add something to this recipe, but we’ll look the other way… just this once.

Cannellini Bean Spread | Bob's Red Mill

Cannellini Bean Spread with Rosemary

  • 1-1/4 cups Cannellini Beans
  • 1/2 cup Onion, chopped
  • 1 Carrot, peeled and finely chopped
  • 1 tsp dried Sage
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 1 large Garlic Clove, peeled
  • 2-inch fresh Rosemary Sprig
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 4 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Directions

Soak the cannellini beans overnight in cold water to cover by 2 inches. Drain the beans and rinse them. Put them in a pot with the onion, carrot, sage, bay leaf, garlic clove, and enough cold water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until tender, 1 to 1-1/2 hours depending on the age of the beans. Add the rosemary sprig to the pot, stir, and set aside for 15 minutes.

Drain the water from the bean mixture, reserving 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Remove the bay leaf and rosemary sprig, and discard. Transfer the bean mixture to a food processor and pulse on and off, adding a bit of cooking liquid if necessary, until the beans are mostly smooth. With the machine running, pour 2 tablespoons of the oil into the processor, blend until smooth. Transfer dip to a serving bowl, drizzle with remaining olive oil and serve.

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Wild Rice and MIllet Stuffing | Bob's Red Mill

Meatless Mondays: Wild Rice and Millet Stuffing

by Cassidy Stockton in Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

This recipe comes from Soundly Vegan and is just the thing to bring whole grains to your Thanksgiving table. It’s allergy friendly- easily meeting the diet needs of guests who are vegetarian, vegan, gluten free, egg free, dairy free, soy free… and, really, if you leave out the hazelnuts, it’s fine for those with nut allergies. Filling and flavorful, this dish really proves how wonderful a gluten free, vegan dish can be. Nothing to miss here. If you really feel like going the extra mile, serve this in a roasted pumpkin (directions below). Cheers!

Wild Rice and Millet Stuffing | Bob's Red Mill

Wild Rice and Millet Stuffing

Contributed by Soundly Vegan

  • 1 cup Wild Rice
  • 1 cup Hulled Millet
  • 2 stalks Celery, finely diced
  • 4 golden Beets, peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 2 cups Brussels Sprouts, quartered
  • 1 cup Cranberries
  • 1/2 cup Hazelnuts
  • 1/2 Leek, sliced thinly
  • 2 Shallots, minced
  • 6 cloves Garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup fresh Parsley, minced
  • 3 sprigs fresh Thyme
  • 1 sprig fresh Rosemary
  • 2 sprigs fresh Sage
  • 6 cups Vegetable Stock, divided
  • 1 Sea Salt to taste
  • 1 Freshly cracked Black Pepper to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 400°F.  Add the millet to a hot pot and toast for a couple of minutes. (You will hear the seeds beginning to pop when they’re ready.) Add 2 cups of vegetable stock and a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil and then drop to a simmer. Cover and cook until the millet is light and fluffy. This should take about 20 minutes.

In another pot, bring 3 cups of vegetable stock to a boil and add the wild rice. Reduce heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for 35-40 minutes or until the rice is soft.

Place the bite-sized pieces of beet and the quartered Brussels sprouts on a sheet pan. Place in the oven and roast for about 30 minutes or until the edges of the vegetables have caramelized.

Add a drizzle of olive oil to a pan and add the celery, shallots, leek and garlic. Cook over medium heat until softened. Add the fresh herbs. Add the hazelnuts and dried cranberries and mix well. Add one cup of vegetable stock and reduce heat to a low simmer.

When the millet is ready, fluff with a fork and transfer to a large bowl. Drain the wild rice when ready, if necessary, and add to the bowl with the millet. Mix in the contents of the pan, removing the herb stems. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Lastly, gently fold in the roasted beets and Brussels sprouts.  Makes 12 servings.

Optional: Serve in a roasted pumpkin. Cut a round out of the top of a medium-sized pumpkin and clean out the seeds and stringy bits with a spoon. Place the hollowed out pumpkin and the top you removed on a baking sheet. Place into a 400°F oven for about an hour or until the pumpkin has softened. Remove from the oven and place upon a plate.

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Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies (GF, V)

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

All the flavors of carrot cake in a cookie fit for breakfast. These tasty little morsels from A Healthful Pursuit are absolutely packed with nutrients, yet taste sinful like any good cookie. They’re vegan and gluten free, though they could easily be made with regular flour, if that’s what you have on hand. Cooked quinoa give them a delightful nuttiness that pairs perfectly with carrots and raisins. Melted coconut butter is a wonderful (and scrumptious) alternative to cream cheese frosting. These make a great breakfast and on-the-go snack, not to mention a fantastic dessert.

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies | Bob's Red Mill

Quinoa Carrot Cake Breakfast Cookies

Contributed by Leanne Vogel of A Healthful Pursuit 

Prep time:  15 mins
Cook time:  30 mins
Total time:  45 mins
Serves: 24

Ingredients

Dry

Wet

  • ½ cup Maple Syrup
  • 2 Tbsp Grape Seed Oil
  • 1 tsp pure Vanilla Extract

Add-ins

  • ⅓ cup Raisins
  • 1 cup shredded Carrot, lightly packed, wrap in a clean kitchen towel and ring out extra juices

Optional Topping

  • 2 tsp melted Coconut Butter

Instructions

  1. Add quinoa and water to a saucepan. Cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, and simmer for 15 minutes. Once complete, remove from the stove, remove lid and allow to cool for a couple of minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicon baking mat. Set aside.
  3. Add all dry ingredients to a large bowl. Then, measure 1½ cups of the cooked quinoa and add to the dry ingredients. Stir to coat, until all quinoa granules are covered in the mixture. Set aside.
  4. Add all wet ingredients to a small bowl and stir well.
  5. Pour into bowl with dry ingredients and stir to combine.
  6. Stir in raisins and shredded carrots.
  7. One tablespoon at a time, scoop mixture onto prepared baking sheet, leaving a small space between each cookie. They will not spread out, so you can keep the cookies close. Lightly form each cookie, as you’d like them to come out. I flattened them slightly between my palms.
  8. Bake in preheated oven for 25-30 minutes, until cooked through and golden.
  9. Remove from the oven, let cool on the pan for 10 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack and allowing them to cool for a couple of hours. Because cooked quinoa was used in this recipe, the longer you leave it to cool, the firmer it will become. Leave it be and it will transform!
  10. Drizzle with melted coconut butter and serve. These cookies can be stored in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Nutritional Information:

Each cookie contains: Calories 100, Calories from Fat 25, Total Fat 2.5 g, Saturated Fat 0 g, Trans Fat 0 g, Cholesterol 0 mg, Sodium 10 mg, Total Carbohydrate 16 g, Dietary Fiber 2 g, Sugars 6 g, Protein 2 g, Vitamin A 15%, Vitamin C 0%, Calcium 2%, Iron 4%.

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Quinoa Chili 2

Meatless Mondays: Buffalo-Style Quinoa Chili

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Earlier this Fall, Bob’s Red Mill partnered with Food52 for a contest titled, “Your Best Quinoa Recipe.” Over 120 recipes were submitted for the contest. The two winning recipes were selected by community voting and Food52 judges. Amber of Loves Food, Loves to Eat  was the chosen winner with her Quinoa Cookies with Coconut & Chocolate Chunks. The second place recipe was this amazing Buffalo-Style Quinoa Chili from Stacy McCann of Every Little Thing.

I’ve been saving this one because it looks like just the thing to warm your soul and I had a feeling that come November, a hearty bowl of chili would be needed around here. Bonus- it’s very simple to make, you’ll probably have most of the ingredients sitting in your pantry AND it’s ready in just 30 minutes. That is THE PERFECT Meatless Mondays meal in my opinion. If you like this recipe, head over to Every Little Thing for some more of Stacy’s great recipes.  If you’re looking for more quinoa inspiration, the other recipes that were submitted look mouthwatering. 

Buffalo-Style Quinoa Chili | Bob's Red Mill

Buffalo-Style Quinoa Chili

Contributed by Stacy McCann of Every Little Thing

Serves 2-4

  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 White Onion, diced
  • 3 stalks Celery, diced
  • One 8-ounce can Tomato Sauce
  • One 14-ounce can Diced Tomatoes
  • 1 cup Vegetable Broth
  • 1 cup cooked Black Beans
  • One 14-ounce can Hominy
  • 1 cup cooked Quinoa
  • 1/2 cup Frank’s Red Hot Sauce, or to taste
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Blue cheese, for topping

1.) Heat the olive oil over medium in a saucepan and, once hot, add the diced onion and celery to the pan. Cook until soft, about 5 minutes.

2.) Stir in the diced tomatoes, tomato sauce, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer cook for 15 minutes. Add in black beans, hominy, quinoa, Frank’s, smoked paprika, cumin, salt, and pepper. Continue to cook 15 more minutes, until the flavors have melded.

3.) To serve, ladle chili into broiler-safe bowls. Top with blue cheese and place under broiler until cheese melts, 3 to 5 minutes.

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pumpkin hand pies1

Gluten Free Vegan Pumpkin Hand Pies

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles, Gluten Free, Recipes

What’s this? More pumpkin pie? Yes! It’s that time of year and this time we’re bringing it in cute little hand pie form. This recipe comes from Sarah Hornacek from Sarah Bakes Gluten Free Treats. Sarah saw our new Gluten Free Pie Crust Mix and couldn’t wait to get her hands on it to start playing around. We just had to oblige. These treats are vegan, but could easily be made with regular butter and shortening if that’s your preference. We love her method for making these hand pies super simple using a biscuit cutter. Way easier than measuring and cutting the dough to be perfect little squares. Of course, you could make these any shape and they’d still be delightful. How fun would these be at Thanksgiving? Kids and adults, alike, will enjoy these portable desserts. I’m already envisioning taking these along on a sledding outing or in the car on a long drive to Grandma’s house. Cheers!

Pumpkin Hand Pies- GF, Vegan | Sarah Bakes Gluten Free Treats

Gluten Free Vegan Pumpkin Hand Pies

makes 20-22 hand pies

Pie Crust

Pumpkin Filling

  • 1 cup Pumpkin Puree
  • 1/4 cup organic Brown Sugar
  • 1 Tbsp pure Maple Syrup
  • 1 tsp Pumpkin Pie Spice*
  • 2 Tbsp Coconut Milk

Cinnamon Glaze

  • 1 cup Powdered Sugar
  • 2 Tbsp Coconut Milk
  • 1/2 tsp Cinnamon

In mixing bowl, add gluten free pie crust mix, cold vegan butter and shortening. Using a pastry cutter, combine until butter pieces are less than pea-size. Pour in 6 tablespoons cold water. Continue to blend until dough comes together (add additional tablespoons of water as needed). Pat dough into 2 round discs and wrap individually in plastic wrap. Refrigerate at least an hour or until ready to use.

Preheat oven to 375. Prepare filling by mixing together the pumpkin puree, brown sugar, maple syrup and pumpkin pie spice. Set aside. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. On counter surface, lay out a large piece of plastic wrap. Place pie dough in center and top with another piece of plastic wrap. Roll with rolling pin until dough is about 1/8″ thick. Using a circle or biscuit cutter, cut into 3-4″ rounds. Place half of rounds on prepared baking sheets.

Place 1 tablespoon of filling in center of pie dough round. Top with another pie dough round. To seal dough, use fork to crimp the edges. Brush tops with coconut milk. Use a small knife to carefully cut a 1/2″ slit into top layer of each pie. Bake for 20-22 minutes or until edges are slight golden brown. Allow to cool on cooling rack. To make the cinnamon glaze, mix together powdered sugar, coconut milk and cinnamon. Drizzle over the top of each cooled hand pie.

*Don’t have pumpkin pie spice on hand? Make your own!

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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