Garbanzo Fava Bean Flour

Flours: A Primer

by Sarah House in Gluten Free, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

The world of flours seems to be growing year after year.  Long gone are the days of two options:  white flour and whole wheat flour.  By my count, Bob’s Red Mill carries fifty-four different flours and meals.  And these range from gluten-free to gluten-full, light to white to whole-grain, single grain flours and flour blends.  Is anyone getting overwhelmed yet?  How in the world does one pick a flour to use?

As many people are aware, there are flours that contain gluten (a protein found in wheat and similar grains and flours that are gluten-free (contain no gluten proteins but therefore aren’t able to create structure as easily as gluten-based baked goods).  Gluten-full grains provide great structure and delicious flavors that can be enjoyed by anyone who is not affected by Celiac disease nor has gluten intolerance.  Gluten-free grains may be enjoyed by anyone and provide many unique flavors, colors, and textures that many gluten-eaters haven’t yet discovered.

Bob's Red Mill Flour Primer: gluten free, high protein, low carb, whole grain- we have it all and we'll tell you how to use it. #bobsredmill

If you aren’t affected by food allergies, eat any and every grain flour you can!  There is a whole wide and wonderful flour-full world out there.  Grains and flours that contain gluten include:  wheat & semolina, barley, Kamut®, rye & pumpernickel, spelt, and triticale.  All-purpose, bread, pastry, and cake flours are typically varieties of gluten flours with differing amounts of protein that correspond to their specific purpose.

If you maintain a more strict diet, don’t fret, your options are far more expansive than you can imagine:  nuts, beans and peas, amaranth, buckwheat, coconut, corn, flax, millet, oat, potato, quinoa, rice (white and brown and sweet), sorghum, soy, tapioca, and teff.  All of these products are inherently gluten-free but they are not always tested for or processed in certified gluten-free facilities, so if you follow a gluten-free diet, make sure to check the labels.

Most gluten-containing flours are available as whole-grain flours (meaning they contain the bran and germ along with the standard endosperm) and white or light versions.  Classifying flour as “white” or “light” indicates that all or most of the bran and germ have been removed.  Why choose one over the other?  Whole grain flours contribute rich flavor and color to a baked item as well as affects the texture (and don’t forget about all the fiber and vitamins and nutrients!).  The gluten and starches in the grains’ endosperm create wonderfully pillowy structures that give us our much-loved sandwich breads, ciabattas, baguettes, cakes, and cookies.  The bran and germ, when included (or not excluded), cut into the endosperm’s structures, thereby creating items with a bit less height and a more defined texture.

The best way to pick your gluten flour is to think about the finished texture.  The lightest and most delicate items should be made with Super-Fine Cake Flour or Unbleached White Pastry Flour.  Hearty heavy-duty breads work best with whole-grain flours like Organic Ivory Wheat Flour and Organic Dark Rye Flour.  Most other items fall right in the middle and can use blends of any light, medium, or heavy flours.  Coarse meals like Organic Pumpernickel Dark Rye Meal and Graham Flour can be added for extra texture and a coarser crumb.

Bob's Red Mill Flour Primer: gluten free, high protein, low carb, whole grain- we have it all and we'll tell you how to use it. #bobsredmill

Super Light

Light

Medium

Heavy

Extra Special Add-Ins

If you are new to whole grain flours or just aren’t in the mood for 100%, try swapping out a portion of your standard white flour for some whole grain.  An easy exchange is 25%.  Use a blend of 75% Unbleached White Fine Pastry Flour and 25% Whole Wheat Pastry Flour in you next pie crust, or try Spelt Flour as a quarter of the flour in your next sandwich bread.  Or just go for it and whip up a batch of whole wheat chocolate chip cookies!  (see recipes below)

Just because you may not follow a gluten-free diet, don’t turn your back on all those gluten-free flours or you will be missing out.  Gluten-free flours run the gamut in terms of flavors and textures.  Gluten-free flours rarely work as stand-alone flour and the typical flour blend consists of two gluten-free flours and one starch.  A good jumping off point is 1/3 of each, but as you become more comfortable and familiar with gluten free baking, you’ll run across and be able to create blends that better suit your personal tastes (more info is available here

Including links about how to use binders).  To incorporate gluten-free flours with gluten-full, swap out the same 25% as you would whole-grain flours.

The most popular gluten-free flours are made from rice and sorghum and rice is milled as both whole grain and white.  These grains contain enough protein to aide in structure and have mild flavors that don’t detract from the ideal finished product.   For yeasted breads, bean flours are often used due to their high protein contents.  Be forewarned, some people may notice a distinct bean flavor and aroma in raw doughs but it will dissipate after baking.

Using gluten-free flours are a great way to change up flavors and textures.  Amaranth and quinoa add savory grain flavors while buckwheat, corn, millet, and oat can walk the line between both sweet and savory.  Teff, buckwheat, and green pea and black bean flours can change up the color along with incorporating unique flavors.

Almond, hazelnut, and flaxseed meal, and coconut flour are all unique ingredients that require a bit more practice and information.  All can be added as an extra addition and almond and hazelnut meal work well as stand-alone flour in certain applications (think macarons, flourless chocolate cakes, and paleo-centric baking).  Flaxseed meal and coconut flour are a bit tricky.  Flaxseed meal combined with water makes a gel-like substance that is a great substitute for eggs when used as binders and is wonderful to add to any baked good for a fiber boost.  Coconut flour is extremely high in fiber and using it as the main ingredient in an item will call for using unique recipes unlike any traditional bakers have seen before.  Adding a tablespoon or so of coconut flour to your recipe will help with liquid absorption and will add a delicate coconut undertone to the flavor.  Before you go adding any more than that, check out some recipes designed especially for coconut flour.

Bob's Red Mill Flour Primer: gluten free, high protein, low carb, whole grain- we have it all and we'll tell you how to use it. #bobsredmill

Creating a Gluten Free Flour Blend:

  • For an all purpose flour blend use a ratio of 1/3 light flour and 2/3 heavy and/or medium flour.
  • For a pastry flour blend use a ratio of 2/3 light flour and 1/3 heavy and/or medium flour.

Substituting Gluten Free Flours for one another:

  • As a general rule, substitute gluten free flours within the same “weight” group cup for cup.
  • By substituting flours, you may experience a change in flavor and texture.

Heavy Flours

Medium Flours

Light Flours

Gluten free flours are classified based on their protein content. Heavy flours assist in creating the structure of your baked goods, as do medium flours. Light flours aid in binding and moisture retention.

These recommendations should help you set out on your foray into whole grain baking.  As you become more comfortable and as you investigate other resources, more and more ideas and flour blends will come your way.  Some excellent new whole grain baking books have come out in the last few years, some even earing award nominations!  Pick up a bag of whole grain flour that piques your interest and start baking!

WholeWheatChocolateChipCookies2s

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Vegan warm French Green Lentils make a quick and easy weeknight meal. Perfect for meatless mondays and suitable for a gluten free diet.  #bobsredmill

{Meatless Mondays} Warm French Lentils

by Cassidy Stockton in Birdspotter, Meatless Mondays

This is one of those perfect meals that takes minimal effort and can be made quickly on a weeknight. The earthy, slightly spicy flavor of lentils mingle with onions, carrots and garlic for a meal that will warm you on a cold, wet Spring day, of which we have plenty in Oregon. Pair this with warm, crusty bread and a green salad for an easy main dish or use it as a side accompaniment with your favorite protein.

If you haven’t done so recently, be sure to visit our website for $1.00 off coupon good for any product. 

Vegan warm French Green Lentils make a quick and easy weeknight meal. Perfect for meatless mondays and suitable for a gluten free diet.  #bobsredmill

Warm French Lentils

Prep Time:  15 minutes | Cook Time:  20 minutes | Yield: 4 servings

  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Petite French Green Lentils
  • 1 Bay Leaf
  • 2 ½ cups Water
  • ¼ cup + 2 Tbsp Olive Oil, divided
  • 1 cup thinly sliced Onion (about ½ large)
  • 1 cup diced Carrots (about 2)
  • 1 tsp minced Garlic
  • 2 Tbsp Red Wine Vinegar
  • 1 Tbsp Dijon Mustard
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp ground Black Pepper

Step 1

Sort and rinse Bob’s Red Mill Petite French Green Lentils.  Combine lentils, bay leaf and water in a pot and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until lentils are tender, about 20 minutes.  Remove bay leaf and drain.

Step 2

While lentils are cooking, heat 2 Tbsp oil in a sauté pan over medium heat.  Add onions and carrots and cook, stirring often, until the onions are tender, about 10 minutes.  Add garlic and cook until fragrant, one additional minute.

Step 3

Meanwhile, whisk together vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper and remaining ¼ cup olive oil.

Step 4

Combine lentils and sautéed onions and carrot with dressing.  Serve warm.

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Pineapple Upsidedown Cake F

Pineapple Upside Down Cake

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

If ever a cake was to be called moist, it would be Pineapple Upside Down Cake. Baked upside down, then inverted, this cake is far easier than it looks. Just look at that picture, all that gooey goodness around the edges? That’s the gold right there. It’s kind of a mix between sweet, crunchy, and sticky—just pure sugary nirvana!

According to KitchenProject.com, upside down cakes were born out of a desire for a cake that did not require an oven. Fruit and sugar were placed in the bottom of a cast iron pan, covered with a simple cake batter and cooked over a fire. Inverting the cake was the natural conclusion to serving it. Pineapple became a traditional version in the early 1900’s when canned pineapple rings became a common place ingredient and maraschino cherries were added to bring pop and color to the cake. You can add cherries to this version, if you like, but we highly recommend using maraschino cherries that are on the natural end of the spectrum.

Make this gluten free with our Gluten Free 1-to-1 Flour or bump up the whole grains with our Whole Wheat Pastry Flour.  We love this decadent Pineapple Upsidedown Cake!

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

Contributed by:  Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen

Prep Time:  20 minutes | Cook Time:  45 minutes | Yield: 12 – 16 servings

Topping

Cake

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Lightly spray a 9- to 10-inch round springform cake pan.

Step 2

In a small saucepan, heat ¼ cup butter and ¾ cup Bob’s Red Mill Cane Sugar until melted and deeply golden, stirring often, about 5 – 7 minutes.  Immediately remove from heat and pour into the bottom of the prepared cake pan.  Arrange the pineapple over the sugar layer in a decorative pattern.  Set aside while the cake batter is prepared.

Step 3

In a small bowl, sift together Bob’s Red Mill Pastry Flour, baking powder, and salt.  Set aside.

Step 4

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or by hand with a spoon, cream 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Cane Sugar and ½ cup butter until light and fluffy, about 10 minutes.

Step 5

Add the vanilla extract and eggs, one at a time, scraping down the sides of the bowl between each addition.

Step 6

Add the dry ingredients, alternating with the reserved pineapple juice, until smooth.  Pour the batter over the sugar and pineapple layer in the prepared cake pan.

Step 7

Bake until set and golden, about 45 minutes.  Let cool 5 – 10 minutes then unmold onto a serving platter.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Italian Easter Pie | Bob's Red Mill

Italian Easter Grain Pie: Two Ways

by Sarah House in Gluten Free, Recipes

Easter, and springtime in general, is known as a season of rebirth, renewal, and growth.  When it comes to food traditions, Easter is one of the most popular and ancient holidays to celebrate at the table with classic dishes.  Many cultures have their own specific dishes made during the season and Italy is definitely a standout for quantity and diversity of Easter foods.

Italy takes its baking seriously (hello pizza, ciabatta, and cannoli!) and Easter-time is no exception.  While casatiello and its ilk are savory dishes filled with everything from prosciutto, mozzarella, and spinach to macaroni, ricotta, and hard boiled eggs, pastiera is the sweet alternative.  Just as every region in Italy has its own version of casatiello et al (pie, cake, or yeasted bread) with a myriad of fillings, so too is pastiera subject to local ingredients and customs.  Recipes will constantly disagree with each other:  chocolate or no chocolate, almonds or pine nuts, how about some rice?  Four things, however, are constant: eggs, grains, ricotta, and oranges.  And how unique to include whole wheat berries (or whole sorghum grains in our gluten-free version) in a sweet dessert dish?

Italian Easter Grain Pie | Bob's Red Mill :: gluten free

While some recipes take extra steps and call for a pastry cream to be cooked on the stove first and then mixed with ricotta and wheat berries and THEN fold in whipped egg whites before being baked in the oven, the recipes below make this delicious dish much easier to prepare.  Make a pie shell, whip up the filling, and bake (just remember to cook those grains ahead of time).  While an overnight rest (or even a few days in the fridge) will help the flavors mingle and intensify, there is no shame in enjoying a slice after a thorough cooling.

Italian Easter Pie | Bob's Red Mill

Italian Easter Pie

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time: 3 hours | Inactive Time: 1 hour to overnight

Yield: 8 – 10 servings (one 9-inch pie)

  • ½ cup Bob’s Red Mill Soft White Wheat Berries
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 4 cups Water
  • One 9-inch prepared Pie Shell, unbaked (plus extra dough for an optional lattice crust)
  • ¾ cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Eggs
  • 3 Tbsp Cornstarch
  • ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • 1 lb Ricotta Cheese
  • 1 Tbsp Orange Zest
  • 2 Tbsp minced Candied Orange Peel (optional)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ tsp Orange Flower Water or ¼ tsp Orange Extract

Step 1

Combine Bob’s Red Mill Soft White Wheat Berries, ½ tsp salt, and 4 cups of water in a medium pot.  Bring to a boil then reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until grains are soft, about 90 minutes.  (Soaking overnight in water to cover will shorten the cooking time.)  When grains have softened, drain off all cooking liquid and allow to cool while the rest of the filling is assembled.

Step 2

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Whisk granulated sugar and eggs in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes with an electric mixer on medium speed.  Meanwhile, combine cornstarch, cinnamon, and salt and mix until evenly combined.

Step 3

In a large bowl, mix together cornstarch mixture, ricotta, orange zest, candied orange peel (if using), vanilla extract, and orange flower water or orange extract.  Add to egg mixture and mix until combined, about 2 minutes.  Fold in cooked and cooled wheat berries.

Step 4

Pour filling into prepared pie shell and top with a lattice crust if desired.  Bake until filling is puffed, golden, and set, about 90 minutes.  Let cool completely before serving.  Pie is better when chilled overnight and served at room temperature.

Italian Easter Pie | Bob's Red Mill  :: gluten free

Italian Easter Pie {Gluten Free}

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time: 3 hours | Inactive Time: 1 hour to overnight

Yield: 8 – 10 servings (one 9-inch pie)

  • ½ cup Bob’s Red Mill Sorghum Grain
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 4 cups Water
  • One 9-inch prepared Gluten-Free Pie Shell, unbaked (plus extra dough for an optional lattice crust)
  • ¾ cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Eggs
  • 3 Tbsp Cornstarch
  • ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • 1 lb Ricotta Cheese
  • 1 Tbsp Orange Zest
  • 2 Tbsp minced Candied Orange Peel (optional)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ tsp Orange Flower Water or ¼ tsp Orange Extract

Step 1

Combine Bob’s Red Mill Sorghum Grain, ½ tsp salt, and 4 cups of water in a medium pot.  Bring to a boil then reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until grains are soft, about 90 minutes.  (Soaking overnight in water to cover will shorten the cooking time.)  When grains have softened, drain off all cooking liquid and allow to cool while the rest of the filling is assembled.

Step 2

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Whisk granulated sugar and eggs in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes with an electric mixer on medium speed.  Meanwhile, combine cornstarch, cinnamon, and salt and mix until evenly combined.

Step 3

In a large bowl, mix together cornstarch mixture, ricotta, orange zest, candied orange peel (if using), vanilla extract, and orange flower water or orange extract.  Add to egg mixture and mix until combined, about 2 minutes.  Fold in cooked and cooled sorghum grains.

Step 4

Pour filling into prepared pie shell and top with a lattice crust if desired.  Bake until filling is puffed, golden, and set, about 90 minutes.  Let cool completely before serving.  Pie is better when chilled overnight and served at room temperature.

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Sarah House Google: Sarah House
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Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill

Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Recently, I was aghast to learn that some people do not like carrot cake. Who are these people? How can anyone not like carrot cake? Kidding aside, I’m a big fan of carrot cake and I know a certain someone whose face graces all of our packaging that would say this is his favorite kind of cake- without raisins of course. Obviously, we’re firm believers in everyone’s right to like or dislike carrot cake (and raisins) as they see fit, but, at Bob’s Red Mill, we love our carrot cake!

The warm, slightly spicy flavors of moist carrot cake under a layer of tangy cream cheese frosting is just the thing we crave this time of year. I absolutely love this version for two reasons- one, it’s for cupcakes, which means it’s easier to make and easier to serve; two- this recipe uses whole wheat pastry flour. Not only does the whole wheat flour offer a denser cake with a nuttier flavor, but I feel less guilty eating one of these and that, my friends, is what I call a win-win.

If you need a gluten free version, we recommend using our Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour in place of the whole wheat pastry flour. 

Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill

Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes

Prep Time:  30 minutes | Bake Time:  25 – 28 minutes | Rest Time:  60 minutes

Yield: 12 standard cupcakes

Cake

  • 1 ½ cups grated Carrot (from 1 – 2 carrots)
  • 8 oz canned Crushed Pineapple, drained
  • ½ cup chopped Walnuts
  • ½ cup Oil
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1 ½ cups Bob’s Red Mill Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 1 ¼ cup Bob’s Red Mill Coconut Sugar
  • 1 tsp Baking Powder
  • ¾ tsp Baking Soda
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 1 ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground Nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp ground Ginger

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°F and line a muffin tin with paper liners.

Step 2

In a large bowl, mix together grated carrots, crushed pineapple, chopped walnuts, oil, eggs, and vanilla extract.  In a separate smaller bowl, combine whole wheat pastry flour, coconut sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and spices.

Step 3

Add the dry to the wet and mix with a rubber spatula to combine.

Step 4

Evenly portion mixture into the prepared muffin tin.  Bake until a tester inserted into the center cupcake comes out clean, 25 – 28 minutes.  Let cool thoroughly (about 1 hour) before frosting.

Frosting

  • ½ cup Butter, soft
  • 1 cup Cream Cheese, soft
  • 4 cups Powdered Sugar, sifted
  • ½ tsp Vanilla Extract

Step 1

Cream softened butter and cream cheese until smooth and evenly combined.

Step 2

Add powdered sugar and vanilla extract and mix until light and fluffy.  Store chilled but must be at room temperature for use.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Hot Cross Buns | Bob's Red MIill @bobsredmill

Hot Cross Buns

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Sweet, dense hot cross buns are a classic Easter treat typically consumed on Good Friday. There are many superstitions around hot cross buns, but our favorite is the goodwill between two friends who share a hot cross bun. The saying goes, “Half for you and half for me, between us two shall goodwill be.” If that’s not a lovely sentiment, I don’t know what is. These challah-like buns have roots back to early Christianity and have long since become part of Easter traditions all over the world.

If you haven’t had a hot cross bun, they’re dense, sweet rolls with warm spices and bits of dried fruit. They are perfect served for breakfast or eaten in the afternoon with a cup of hot tea. You can add the icing cross or omit it, the buns will be delightful no matter what you choose. Whatever you do, share them with a friend or loved one in the spirit of lasting friendship and you’ll be so glad you did.

[Note: If you’re gluten free, check back tomorrow for our gluten free version.]

Hot Cross Buns | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill

Hot Cross Buns

Contributed by:  Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Natural Foods

Prep Time:  30 minutes | Rest Time:  2 – 3 hours | Cook Time:  25 minutes

Yield: 12 servings

Buns

Wash

  • 1 Egg
  • 1 Tbsp Water

Icing

  • 2 cups Powdered Sugar
  • 2 Tbsp Milk
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract

Step 1

Combine warm milk and yeast in a large mixing bowl.  Let sit for 5 minutes while yeast dissolves.  Meanwhile, combine 3 cups Bob’s Red Mill Unbleached White All-Purpose Flour, salt, and spices in a bowl and set aside.

Step 2

Add melted butter, egg, vanilla extract, and flour mixture to the yeast.  Mix until a shaggy dough forms, about 2 minutes with a dough hook in a stand mixer or 4 – 5 minutes by hand.

Step 3

Add currants and knead until a smooth and elastic dough forms, about 9 minutes in a stand mixer at medium speed or 10 – 15 minutes by hand.  Add remaining ½ cup flour only if needed to make a workable dough.  Shape dough into a ball. 

Step 4

Place dough in a large bowl lightly coated with oil; turn once to coat both sides.  Cover and set aside in a warm place to rise until doubled in size 60 – 90 minutes.  Meanwhile, line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside.

Step 5

Turn the risen dough out onto a lightly floured surface and divide into twelve equal pieces, about 2 oz of dough per piece.  Shape each piece into a tightly formed bun and place seam-side down on the prepared baking sheet.  When all buns are formed, cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.  Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375°F.

Step 6

For the wash, combine egg and water and mix well.  Once buns have doubled in size, gently brush the top and sides of each bun with egg wash.  Bake until buns are deep golden and the interiors have reached 190°F, about 25 minutes.  Let cool at least 30 minutes before icing.

Step 7

For icing, combine all ingredient and mix until smooth.  Drizzle a cross over each cooled bun.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Sweet Potato and Sage Pull Apart Rolls from Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill |gluten free, vegan

Sweet Potato and Sage Pull-Apart Rolls (GF) {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Bread & Butter is the third book from renowned gluten free, vegan baker Erin McKenna of Erin McKenna’s Bakery (formerly Babycakes NYC). This book is exactly what you’d expect from Erin McKenna- beautiful recipes with fun, bright photography. Bread & Butter is a full course of gluten free bread baking with a side of pastries. Basic breads like “rye” bread (say what??) and sandwich bread abound next to more unusual fare like these pull-apart rolls and spicy vegetable cornbread. There are so many awesome recipes in this book, we can’t begin to name them all.

Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna | Bob's Red Mill  @bobsredmill

We see a lot of cookbooks around here and what we like about this book is that it’s relatively small, so you’re not thumbing through 500 recipes, and it’s full of rather unique recipes. Plus, we know from personal experience that Erin’s recipes are reliable and delicious. We absolutely adore Erin’s writing style and her easy-to-follow recipes. Bonus: all of the recipes are vegan, making this ideal for anyone with both gluten and dairy restrictions.

Random House has generously offered us three copies of Bread & Butter to giveaway. We’ll pair each copy with a bag of our gluten free oat flour, cornmeal, potato starch and xanthan gum so you can get started baking right away. To enter, follow the prompts at the bottom of this post. We’ll select three winners at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 3/29/15. If you just can’t wait, look for this book at your favorite local bookseller.

Sweet Potato and Sage Pull Apart Rolls from Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill |gluten free, vegan

Sweet Potato and Sage Pull-Apart Rolls

Makes 12 rolls

  • ¼ cup (33 g) cornmeal, for the baking
    sheet
  • 1½ cups (339 g) warm rice milk (about 100°F)
  • 3 tablespoons (66 g) agave nectar
  • 2½ teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¹⁄³ cup (70 g) melted unscented coconut oil
  • ½ cup (165 g) canned sweet potato puree (at room temperature)
  • 3 cups (300 g) gluten-free oat flour
  • ½ cup (96 g) potato starch
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1½ teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • ¹⁄³ cup (9 g) sage leaves, chopped

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, dust with cornmeal, and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine the warm rice milk, agave nectar, and yeast. Stir once and set aside to proof until it bubbles, about 10 minutes. Whisk in the oil and sweet potato.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the oat flour, potato starch, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum, and salt. Pour in the yeast mixture and, using a rubber spatula, stir until it is the consistency of a sticky dough. Fold in the sage.

Using a ½-cup measuring cup, scoop heaping portions of batter onto the prepared baking sheet and shape into squares. Leave no more than ½ inch between each roll on the pan. Cover the baking sheet with a dish towel and let the rolls rise for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Bake the rolls for 10 minutes, and then rotate the baking sheet 180 degrees. Bake until the crust is golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 6 minutes. Let the rolls cool on the pan for 10 minutes before serving.

Recipe from Bread & Butter (c) 2015 Erin McKenna

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Date Sugar

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday

Welcome to What is it? Wednesdays! Every other Wednesday, we’ll explore a different ingredient or product in depth. We’ll be covering the benefits, uses and common misconceptions about each. If you have any requests, leave them in the comments and we’ll work them into the schedule. 

***

What is Date Sugar? Date sugar is one of those rare sugars that is pretty much what you’d expect- ground, dried dates. Our date sugar has a small amount of oat flour added to help prevent clumping, but if you’re familiar with this product, this doesn’t always work. One of the most frustrating things about date sugar is it’s ability to form into one solid brick. I think you could build houses with date sugar bricks. It’s sweet, but not as sweet (in my opinion) as cane sugar, light tan in color and granulated (unless it’s become a brick, that is). On that note…

How do you soften Date Sugar? The best trick we’ve learned in the years of selling date sugar is to place the date sugar in the microwave for a few seconds until it begins to soften.

What is it? Wednesday: Date Sugar | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill

How do you use Date Sugar? Date sugar can replace white sugar cup for cup. If you desire your baked goods to be less sweet, we recommend 2/3 cup date sugar to replace 1 cup white sugar. It works well sprinkled on cereal and baked goods, but this is not the sugar you want to sweeten your hot drinks with. It will not fully dissolve.

Does Bob’s Red Mill Date Sugar contain sulfites or nitrates? No, our date sugar is simply dates and oat flour.

What kind of dates are used? Our date sugar is made from the Deglet Noor variety of dates.

Is Bob’s Red Mill Date Sugar vegan? Yes, our date sugar is suitable for a vegan diet.

Is Bob’s Red Mill Date Sugar gluten free? While date sugar is inherently gluten free, we do not package it in our gluten free facility or test it for gluten. Because of the nature of oats and their risk of cross contact with wheat, we do not recommend those on a strict gluten free diet use our date sugar.

Is Date Sugar suitable for diabetics? Every individual is unique and may react differently to date sugar, but generally speaking date sugar has a GI of 23 versus white sugar’s GI of 80. This may be a better choice for diabetics.

Try it! This recipe for Apple Spice Muffins (pictured above) is a great jumping off point for date sugar.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Gluten Free Flour Tortillas | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free

{Meatless Mondays} Gluten Free Flour Tortillas

by Sarena Shasteen in Gluten Free, Meatless Mondays, Recipes

To be perfectly honest, when you live with a restricted diet due to food allergies and intolerances, it really is tough in the beginning and you eventually learn to just live without sometimes. Now, while I love getting creative in the kitchen, there are a few foods that I really just let go of out of ease. A flour tortilla is one of them. Our family just kind of resolved to not being able to have them and so we just gave in to buying corn tortillas instead. Though we do like corn tortillas, there are times when you really want the soft chewiness of a flour tortilla, ya know?

Gluten Free Flour Tortillas | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free

I will admit, these tortillas do take a little bit of time to prepare, but I assure you they are so worth the time. They are soft, yet durable enough to hold all the goodness you want to put in them! I have used them for soft tacos and quesadillas! They soften up when heated either in the microwave for about 15 seconds or heated in a skillet briefly. They also crisp up really well for quesadillas. I’m also happy to say that we had a few left over and they stayed fresh for up to three days sealed in a container on the counter!

Gluten Free Flour Tortillas | Bob's Red Mill vegan, gluten free

Gluten Free Flour Tortillas

makes 20 small or 10 large

In a large mixing bowl, combine the gluten free 1-to-1 flour, baking powder and salt; mix well. Then, add the carbonated water (start with 2-1/4 cups and add more as needed), olive oil and apple cider vinegar to the flour mixture. Combine all of these together and allow the mixture to sit for an hour. The dough should be thick, but slightly sticky to the touch. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and spray lightly with cooking spray. Using a large cookie scoop*, scoop out one or two scoops of dough per tortilla. With wet hands, press out the tortillas to make a thin circle. Place the pans in the oven and bake the tortillas for 5 minutes, then flip the tortillas and bake for another 3 to 5 minutes.

*Since gluten free doughs need to be slightly wetter than their gluten counter parts, I use my large cookie scoop when I need to scoop out even sized things like rolls or tortillas. It keeps things a little cleaner and insures that I can bake things evenly through.

Sarena Shasteen: The Non Dairy QueenSarena Shasteen has been an avid health food and fitness enthusiast from an early age. She holds a degree in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Atlanta, a certification in Fitness Nutrition and is a certified Fitness Trainer from International Sport Science Association (ISSA). Becoming a Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition has been a lifelong goal of hers. Sarena enjoys helping others reach their health goals by teaching them that health and fitness are not only achieved in the gym, but also through fun everyday activities. Now a food writer, recipe developer, personal chef,  Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition, she enjoys sharing with others that healthy living can be fun and delicious. Keep up with her at The Non Dairy Queen and on Facebook and Twitter.

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Sarena Shasteen Google: Sarena Shasteen
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Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins | Bob's Red Mill

Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins

by Cassidy Stockton in Gluten Free, Recipes

Over the weekend, a group of us from Bob’s Red Mill attended Natural Products Expo West in Anaheim, Ca. While there, we gave away samples of our gluten free blueberry muffins using our new Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour. I, honestly, couldn’t believe how well received they were. This is an event with thousands of booths, many giving away samples and goodies of their own. Word of our muffins spread throughout the show and folks were coming for muffins all day, even though we only served them for breakfast. They were (are) that good.

This is the same recipe on our package for Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour and the same recipe we sampled at the show. It’s solid and reliable and utterly delicious. Blueberry muffins are one of my all-time favorites and I’m so pleased that these gluten free muffins taste like the real deal. Bake a batch, sprinkle with our new Sparkling Sugar and prepare for the accolades you’ll get from all who try them.

Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins | Bob's Red Mill

Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins

STEP  1 Preheat oven to 425° F. Grease a muffin pan with butter or nonstick spray or line with paper baking cups.

STEP 2  Whisk together flour, baking powder and salt. Set aside.

STEP 3 In a large bowl, cream together butter and 1¼ cups sugar until light and fluffy, scraping down the sides of the bowl often. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.

STEP 4  Add half the flour mixture and beat until just blended. Beat in buttermilk, then add remaining flour mixture and beat until blended. Gently fold the blueberries into the batter.

STEP 5 Spoon batter into prepared muffin pan. Sprinkle with remaining 1 Tbsp sugar.

STEP 6 Place pan in oven and immediately reduce heat to 375° F. Bake for 30 minutes or until muffins are golden brown. Cool in pan for 5 minutes. Move to wire rack to cool completely. Makes 12 muffins.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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