Gluten Free Dairy Free Oatmeal Quick Bread | Bob's Red Mill

Oatmeal Quick Bread- Gluten and Dairy Free

by Sarena Shasteen in Gluten Free, Recipes

Who says you can’t have bread just because you can’t eat gluten? Not this girl for sure. Let’s just say I make a lot of bread around here for a family that’s gluten free. The breads I make range from kind of complicated to really easy. Today, I’m sharing a really easy recipe with you. I came up with this jewel out of a need for a quick hearty bread to go with our Sunday brunch, as well as, needing something easy that my husband can throw together when he’s needing bread with dinner. This oatmeal quick bread goes really well with a salad or bowl of soup. It has an amazingly crunchy crust on the outside with a beautifully dense chewy interior highlighted by a wholesome nutty flavor from the oatmeal. For brunch, we served it with butter and a drizzle of honey. It was delicious!

Gluten Free Dairy Free Oatmeal Quick Bread | Bob's Red Mill

Gluten and Dairy Free Oatmeal Quick Bread

(makes about a 1 pound loaf)

In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, oatmeal, baking powder, salt and baking soda. Mix well with a fork. Next add the cold butter to the flour mixture and cut it in with a fork until thoroughly combined and the mixture resembles a course meal. Next add the milk, eggs and vinegar to the flour mixture using a fork or a rubber spatula. Stir until well combined. Refrigerate the dough for 10 minutes while you preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. When the oven is ready, using the rubber spatula, form the dough into a ball and then dump it onto the parchment paper. Using the spatula, even out the dough ball to for a circle. Cut a cross into the dough and then sprinkle the top with the reserved oatmeal. Bake for 40 to 60 minutes or until slightly browned and the crust sounds hollow when tapped. Allow to cool for at least 20 minutes then slice and serve.

Gluten Free Dairy Free Oatmeal Quick Bread | Bob's Red Mill

Sarena Shasteen: The Non Dairy QueenSarena Shasteen has been an avid health food and fitness enthusiast from an early age. She holds a degree in Culinary Arts from The Art Institute of Atlanta, a certification in Fitness Nutrition and is a certified Fitness Trainer from International Sport Science Association (ISSA). Becoming a Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition has been a lifelong goal of hers. Sarena enjoys helping others reach their health goals by teaching them that health and fitness are not only achieved in the gym, but also through fun everyday activities. Now a food writer, recipe developer, personal chef,  Personal Trainer and Specialist in Fitness Nutrition, she enjoys sharing with others that healthy living can be fun and delicious. Keep up with her at The Non Dairy Queen and on Facebook and Twitter.

 

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What is it Wednesday | Bob's Red Mill

What is it? Wednesday: Popcorn

by Cassidy Stockton in What is it? Wednesday, Whole Grains 101

What is popcorn and what makes it different from ‘regular’ corn? Popcorn is quite simply, a variety of corn. Some corn is best for milling cornmeal, some corn is best for eating on the cob, some corn is best for feeding livestock and some corn is best for popping. Unlike these other types of corn, popcorn is the only variety of corn that will pop when exposed to heat.

What is the difference between white, yellow, red, blue and all the other colors of popcorn? The color of the hulls is the primary difference between the different colors of popcorn. That shiny outer layer of a popcorn kernel is the hull and will be different colors depending on the variety of popcorn. The white part we associate with popcorn is generally white (I have yet to see one that is truly another color) regardless of the hull color. I have noticed that blue popcorn tends to be very white, while yellow is a bit more creamy. No matter what, though, they all have pretty much the same corn flavor and nutritional profile.

Is popcorn a whole grain? Yes, all popcorn is whole grain. Whether you buy the chemical-laden packets from the store or choose a simple bag of unpopped kernels like ours, all popcorn is whole grain. This makes it an ideal snack. We prefer the simple popcorn to the junky versions, but in the world of snacks, popcorn is far superior to convenience foods. It has a healthy dose of fiber, is very low in calories and pretty darn tasty, too!

What is it? Wednesday: Popcorn | Bob's Red Mill non-gmo, gluten free, healthy

Is Bob’s Red Mill popcorn gluten free? Popcorn is naturally gluten free. At this time, our popcorn is not certified or tested gluten free. We plan to add gluten free testing and our gluten free symbol in a few months. If gluten is a concern for you, be sure to look for our gluten free symbol on the packaging.

Is Bob’s Red Mill popcorn non-GMO? Yes! Bob’s Red Mill yellow and white popcorn were the very first Non-GMO Project verified items in our line. They will be the first products to proudly display the Non-GMO Project logo.

What is it? Wednesday: Popcorn | Bob's Red Mill non-gmo, gluten free, healthy

What is the best way to make it? Do you need a popper? There is no single right way to make popcorn. Anyway that yields a healthy amount of popped corn is right in our book, however, you don’t need a popper and you don’t need a fancy packet to make a quick batch of popcorn in the microwave. Check out this post for a handy, easy-to-follow microwave method using only popcorn and a paper bag. (These instructions will start appearing on our packaging soon.) Works like a charm, trust us.

Our favorite ways to enjoy popcorn are:

 

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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steepedF

Green Tea Granola + Steeped Giveaway

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Recipes

It’s not everyday that a cookbook built around tea comes across our plate. Okay, let’s be honest, it’s never happened. When Annelies Zijderveld, of The Food Poet, reached out about her first book, Steeped, we jumped at the opportunity and we’re so glad we did. Steeped is a lovely book that covers the history and intricacies of tea consumption with recipes to fuel your experimentation. The book is broken out into recipes that are appropriate for Morning tea, Midday Tea, Afternoon Tea, High Tea and Sweet Tea. Steeped has a guide for what should be in your tea cabinet, as well as a section that sorts the recipes according to which type of tea you want to use. Recipes range from beautiful parfaits and smoothies to more complicated breads, muffins and desserts to main dishes, salads and sides- all made and flavored with tea. Many of the recipes are accompanied by beautiful photography and lovely tea-inspired quotes.

Steeped: Recipes Infused with Tea by Annelies Zijderveld

Additionally, Zijderveld recommends whole grain spelt flour for most of her baked goods, which made us swoon with delight. Spelt is an underrated, but incredibly nutritious whole grain flour that mimics wheat flour perfectly. While it is technically a type of wheat, many people with wheat allergies can tolerate spelt. It’s very easy to digest and has a pleasant flavor.

All around, Steeped is a beautiful book. It would be a delightful gift for the tea-lover in your life or a food enthusiast who is looking for their next adventure. We’ve partnered with Andrews McMeel Publishing to giveaway a copy of this lovely book to one lucky winner. We’ll pair a copy of this book with two packages of our spelt flour. If you want to grab a copy for yourself, snag one on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or visit your local book store. To enter, simply follow the prompts below. We’ll select one winner at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 4/19/2015. 

Green Tea Granola from Steeped by Annelies Zijderveld | gluten free adaptable.

Green Tea Granola

Makes 2 quarts

I serve these with lychee chunks, crisp Asian pear, and labneh, with a wake-up grating of fresh ginger to pull it all together. You can make your own labneh, or use store-bought (my favorite brand is Karoun), or Greek yogurt instead.

  • 4 cups rolled oats
  • 2 cups chopped walnuts
  • ¼ cup sesame seeds
  • 4 teaspoons amaranth
  • 2 tablespoons loose or 4 bags (cut open) Dragon Well green tea
  • 6 tablespoons safflower, grapeseed, or other neutral oil
  • 4 tablespoons maple syrup
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 cup golden raisins

Preheat the oven to 275°F. Place a sheet of parchment paper onto an 18-inch sheet pan. Stir together the oats, walnuts, and sesame seeds in a medium bowl.

Heat a small fry pan over medium-high heat until a drop of water sizzles. Pour in ½ teaspoon amaranth, cover, and pop like popcorn for 30 seconds or until popping slows. Listen carefully! Amaranth pops quickly and will burn just as fast. Move the popped amaranth from the pan to the bowl and repeat with the remaining amaranth, ½ teaspoon at a time.

In a small saucepan set over low heat, combine the tea, oil, maple syrup, cardamom, and salt. Stir until heated through and combined. Stir the tea and oil into the oats to coat.

Pour the green tea granola onto the baking sheet, spreading evenly in a single layer. Bake for 32 minutes or until golden brown, stirring three times or every 8 minutes. Cool the granola to harden on the baking sheet and stir in the raisins.

From Steeped: Recipes Infused with Tea by Annelies Zijderveld, Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Garbanzo Fava Bean Flour

Flours: A Primer

by Sarah House in Gluten Free, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

The world of flours seems to be growing year after year.  Long gone are the days of two options:  white flour and whole wheat flour.  By my count, Bob’s Red Mill carries fifty-four different flours and meals.  And these range from gluten-free to gluten-full, light to white to whole-grain, single grain flours and flour blends.  Is anyone getting overwhelmed yet?  How in the world does one pick a flour to use?

As many people are aware, there are flours that contain gluten (a protein found in wheat and similar grains and flours that are gluten-free (contain no gluten proteins but therefore aren’t able to create structure as easily as gluten-based baked goods).  Gluten-full grains provide great structure and delicious flavors that can be enjoyed by anyone who is not affected by Celiac disease nor has gluten intolerance.  Gluten-free grains may be enjoyed by anyone and provide many unique flavors, colors, and textures that many gluten-eaters haven’t yet discovered.

Bob's Red Mill Flour Primer: gluten free, high protein, low carb, whole grain- we have it all and we'll tell you how to use it. #bobsredmill

If you aren’t affected by food allergies, eat any and every grain flour you can!  There is a whole wide and wonderful flour-full world out there.  Grains and flours that contain gluten include:  wheat & semolina, barley, Kamut®, rye & pumpernickel, spelt, and triticale.  All-purpose, bread, pastry, and cake flours are typically varieties of gluten flours with differing amounts of protein that correspond to their specific purpose.

If you maintain a more strict diet, don’t fret, your options are far more expansive than you can imagine:  nuts, beans and peas, amaranth, buckwheat, coconut, corn, flax, millet, oat, potato, quinoa, rice (white and brown and sweet), sorghum, soy, tapioca, and teff.  All of these products are inherently gluten-free but they are not always tested for or processed in certified gluten-free facilities, so if you follow a gluten-free diet, make sure to check the labels.

Most gluten-containing flours are available as whole-grain flours (meaning they contain the bran and germ along with the standard endosperm) and white or light versions.  Classifying flour as “white” or “light” indicates that all or most of the bran and germ have been removed.  Why choose one over the other?  Whole grain flours contribute rich flavor and color to a baked item as well as affects the texture (and don’t forget about all the fiber and vitamins and nutrients!).  The gluten and starches in the grains’ endosperm create wonderfully pillowy structures that give us our much-loved sandwich breads, ciabattas, baguettes, cakes, and cookies.  The bran and germ, when included (or not excluded), cut into the endosperm’s structures, thereby creating items with a bit less height and a more defined texture.

The best way to pick your gluten flour is to think about the finished texture.  The lightest and most delicate items should be made with Super-Fine Cake Flour or Unbleached White Pastry Flour.  Hearty heavy-duty breads work best with whole-grain flours like Organic Ivory Wheat Flour and Organic Dark Rye Flour.  Most other items fall right in the middle and can use blends of any light, medium, or heavy flours.  Coarse meals like Organic Pumpernickel Dark Rye Meal and Graham Flour can be added for extra texture and a coarser crumb.

Bob's Red Mill Flour Primer: gluten free, high protein, low carb, whole grain- we have it all and we'll tell you how to use it. #bobsredmill

Super Light

Light

Medium

Heavy

Extra Special Add-Ins

If you are new to whole grain flours or just aren’t in the mood for 100%, try swapping out a portion of your standard white flour for some whole grain.  An easy exchange is 25%.  Use a blend of 75% Unbleached White Fine Pastry Flour and 25% Whole Wheat Pastry Flour in you next pie crust, or try Spelt Flour as a quarter of the flour in your next sandwich bread.  Or just go for it and whip up a batch of whole wheat chocolate chip cookies!  (see recipes below)

Just because you may not follow a gluten-free diet, don’t turn your back on all those gluten-free flours or you will be missing out.  Gluten-free flours run the gamut in terms of flavors and textures.  Gluten-free flours rarely work as stand-alone flour and the typical flour blend consists of two gluten-free flours and one starch.  A good jumping off point is 1/3 of each, but as you become more comfortable and familiar with gluten free baking, you’ll run across and be able to create blends that better suit your personal tastes (more info is available here

Including links about how to use binders).  To incorporate gluten-free flours with gluten-full, swap out the same 25% as you would whole-grain flours.

The most popular gluten-free flours are made from rice and sorghum and rice is milled as both whole grain and white.  These grains contain enough protein to aide in structure and have mild flavors that don’t detract from the ideal finished product.   For yeasted breads, bean flours are often used due to their high protein contents.  Be forewarned, some people may notice a distinct bean flavor and aroma in raw doughs but it will dissipate after baking.

Using gluten-free flours are a great way to change up flavors and textures.  Amaranth and quinoa add savory grain flavors while buckwheat, corn, millet, and oat can walk the line between both sweet and savory.  Teff, buckwheat, and green pea and black bean flours can change up the color along with incorporating unique flavors.

Almond, hazelnut, and flaxseed meal, and coconut flour are all unique ingredients that require a bit more practice and information.  All can be added as an extra addition and almond and hazelnut meal work well as stand-alone flour in certain applications (think macarons, flourless chocolate cakes, and paleo-centric baking).  Flaxseed meal and coconut flour are a bit tricky.  Flaxseed meal combined with water makes a gel-like substance that is a great substitute for eggs when used as binders and is wonderful to add to any baked good for a fiber boost.  Coconut flour is extremely high in fiber and using it as the main ingredient in an item will call for using unique recipes unlike any traditional bakers have seen before.  Adding a tablespoon or so of coconut flour to your recipe will help with liquid absorption and will add a delicate coconut undertone to the flavor.  Before you go adding any more than that, check out some recipes designed especially for coconut flour.

Bob's Red Mill Flour Primer: gluten free, high protein, low carb, whole grain- we have it all and we'll tell you how to use it. #bobsredmill

Creating a Gluten Free Flour Blend:

  • For an all purpose flour blend use a ratio of 1/3 light flour and 2/3 heavy and/or medium flour.
  • For a pastry flour blend use a ratio of 2/3 light flour and 1/3 heavy and/or medium flour.

Substituting Gluten Free Flours for one another:

  • As a general rule, substitute gluten free flours within the same “weight” group cup for cup.
  • By substituting flours, you may experience a change in flavor and texture.

Heavy Flours

Medium Flours

Light Flours

Gluten free flours are classified based on their protein content. Heavy flours assist in creating the structure of your baked goods, as do medium flours. Light flours aid in binding and moisture retention.

These recommendations should help you set out on your foray into whole grain baking.  As you become more comfortable and as you investigate other resources, more and more ideas and flour blends will come your way.  Some excellent new whole grain baking books have come out in the last few years, some even earing award nominations!  Pick up a bag of whole grain flour that piques your interest and start baking!

WholeWheatChocolateChipCookies2s

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Italian Easter Pie | Bob's Red Mill

Italian Easter Grain Pie: Two Ways

by Sarah House in Gluten Free, Recipes

Easter, and springtime in general, is known as a season of rebirth, renewal, and growth.  When it comes to food traditions, Easter is one of the most popular and ancient holidays to celebrate at the table with classic dishes.  Many cultures have their own specific dishes made during the season and Italy is definitely a standout for quantity and diversity of Easter foods.

Italy takes its baking seriously (hello pizza, ciabatta, and cannoli!) and Easter-time is no exception.  While casatiello and its ilk are savory dishes filled with everything from prosciutto, mozzarella, and spinach to macaroni, ricotta, and hard boiled eggs, pastiera is the sweet alternative.  Just as every region in Italy has its own version of casatiello et al (pie, cake, or yeasted bread) with a myriad of fillings, so too is pastiera subject to local ingredients and customs.  Recipes will constantly disagree with each other:  chocolate or no chocolate, almonds or pine nuts, how about some rice?  Four things, however, are constant: eggs, grains, ricotta, and oranges.  And how unique to include whole wheat berries (or whole sorghum grains in our gluten-free version) in a sweet dessert dish?

Italian Easter Grain Pie | Bob's Red Mill :: gluten free

While some recipes take extra steps and call for a pastry cream to be cooked on the stove first and then mixed with ricotta and wheat berries and THEN fold in whipped egg whites before being baked in the oven, the recipes below make this delicious dish much easier to prepare.  Make a pie shell, whip up the filling, and bake (just remember to cook those grains ahead of time).  While an overnight rest (or even a few days in the fridge) will help the flavors mingle and intensify, there is no shame in enjoying a slice after a thorough cooling.

Italian Easter Pie | Bob's Red Mill

Italian Easter Pie

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time: 3 hours | Inactive Time: 1 hour to overnight

Yield: 8 – 10 servings (one 9-inch pie)

  • ½ cup Bob’s Red Mill Soft White Wheat Berries
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 4 cups Water
  • One 9-inch prepared Pie Shell, unbaked (plus extra dough for an optional lattice crust)
  • ¾ cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Eggs
  • 3 Tbsp Cornstarch
  • ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • 1 lb Ricotta Cheese
  • 1 Tbsp Orange Zest
  • 2 Tbsp minced Candied Orange Peel (optional)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ tsp Orange Flower Water or ¼ tsp Orange Extract

Step 1

Combine Bob’s Red Mill Soft White Wheat Berries, ½ tsp salt, and 4 cups of water in a medium pot.  Bring to a boil then reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until grains are soft, about 90 minutes.  (Soaking overnight in water to cover will shorten the cooking time.)  When grains have softened, drain off all cooking liquid and allow to cool while the rest of the filling is assembled.

Step 2

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Whisk granulated sugar and eggs in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes with an electric mixer on medium speed.  Meanwhile, combine cornstarch, cinnamon, and salt and mix until evenly combined.

Step 3

In a large bowl, mix together cornstarch mixture, ricotta, orange zest, candied orange peel (if using), vanilla extract, and orange flower water or orange extract.  Add to egg mixture and mix until combined, about 2 minutes.  Fold in cooked and cooled wheat berries.

Step 4

Pour filling into prepared pie shell and top with a lattice crust if desired.  Bake until filling is puffed, golden, and set, about 90 minutes.  Let cool completely before serving.  Pie is better when chilled overnight and served at room temperature.

Italian Easter Pie | Bob's Red Mill  :: gluten free

Italian Easter Pie {Gluten Free}

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time: 3 hours | Inactive Time: 1 hour to overnight

Yield: 8 – 10 servings (one 9-inch pie)

  • ½ cup Bob’s Red Mill Sorghum Grain
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 4 cups Water
  • One 9-inch prepared Gluten-Free Pie Shell, unbaked (plus extra dough for an optional lattice crust)
  • ¾ cup Granulated Sugar
  • 3 Eggs
  • 3 Tbsp Cornstarch
  • ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • 1 lb Ricotta Cheese
  • 1 Tbsp Orange Zest
  • 2 Tbsp minced Candied Orange Peel (optional)
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • ½ tsp Orange Flower Water or ¼ tsp Orange Extract

Step 1

Combine Bob’s Red Mill Sorghum Grain, ½ tsp salt, and 4 cups of water in a medium pot.  Bring to a boil then reduce heat and simmer, partially covered, until grains are soft, about 90 minutes.  (Soaking overnight in water to cover will shorten the cooking time.)  When grains have softened, drain off all cooking liquid and allow to cool while the rest of the filling is assembled.

Step 2

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Whisk granulated sugar and eggs in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes with an electric mixer on medium speed.  Meanwhile, combine cornstarch, cinnamon, and salt and mix until evenly combined.

Step 3

In a large bowl, mix together cornstarch mixture, ricotta, orange zest, candied orange peel (if using), vanilla extract, and orange flower water or orange extract.  Add to egg mixture and mix until combined, about 2 minutes.  Fold in cooked and cooled sorghum grains.

Step 4

Pour filling into prepared pie shell and top with a lattice crust if desired.  Bake until filling is puffed, golden, and set, about 90 minutes.  Let cool completely before serving.  Pie is better when chilled overnight and served at room temperature.

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Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill

Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Recently, I was aghast to learn that some people do not like carrot cake. Who are these people? How can anyone not like carrot cake? Kidding aside, I’m a big fan of carrot cake and I know a certain someone whose face graces all of our packaging that would say this is his favorite kind of cake- without raisins of course. Obviously, we’re firm believers in everyone’s right to like or dislike carrot cake (and raisins) as they see fit, but, at Bob’s Red Mill, we love our carrot cake!

The warm, slightly spicy flavors of moist carrot cake under a layer of tangy cream cheese frosting is just the thing we crave this time of year. I absolutely love this version for two reasons- one, it’s for cupcakes, which means it’s easier to make and easier to serve; two- this recipe uses whole wheat pastry flour. Not only does the whole wheat flour offer a denser cake with a nuttier flavor, but I feel less guilty eating one of these and that, my friends, is what I call a win-win.

If you need a gluten free version, we recommend using our Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour in place of the whole wheat pastry flour. 

Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill

Whole Wheat Carrot Cupcakes

Prep Time:  30 minutes | Bake Time:  25 – 28 minutes | Rest Time:  60 minutes

Yield: 12 standard cupcakes

Cake

  • 1 ½ cups grated Carrot (from 1 – 2 carrots)
  • 8 oz canned Crushed Pineapple, drained
  • ½ cup chopped Walnuts
  • ½ cup Oil
  • 2 Eggs
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1 ½ cups Bob’s Red Mill Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 1 ¼ cup Bob’s Red Mill Coconut Sugar
  • 1 tsp Baking Powder
  • ¾ tsp Baking Soda
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • 1 ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground Nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp ground Ginger

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°F and line a muffin tin with paper liners.

Step 2

In a large bowl, mix together grated carrots, crushed pineapple, chopped walnuts, oil, eggs, and vanilla extract.  In a separate smaller bowl, combine whole wheat pastry flour, coconut sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and spices.

Step 3

Add the dry to the wet and mix with a rubber spatula to combine.

Step 4

Evenly portion mixture into the prepared muffin tin.  Bake until a tester inserted into the center cupcake comes out clean, 25 – 28 minutes.  Let cool thoroughly (about 1 hour) before frosting.

Frosting

  • ½ cup Butter, soft
  • 1 cup Cream Cheese, soft
  • 4 cups Powdered Sugar, sifted
  • ½ tsp Vanilla Extract

Step 1

Cream softened butter and cream cheese until smooth and evenly combined.

Step 2

Add powdered sugar and vanilla extract and mix until light and fluffy.  Store chilled but must be at room temperature for use.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Sweet Potato and Sage Pull Apart Rolls from Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill |gluten free, vegan

Sweet Potato and Sage Pull-Apart Rolls (GF) {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Featured Articles

Bread & Butter is the third book from renowned gluten free, vegan baker Erin McKenna of Erin McKenna’s Bakery (formerly Babycakes NYC). This book is exactly what you’d expect from Erin McKenna- beautiful recipes with fun, bright photography. Bread & Butter is a full course of gluten free bread baking with a side of pastries. Basic breads like “rye” bread (say what??) and sandwich bread abound next to more unusual fare like these pull-apart rolls and spicy vegetable cornbread. There are so many awesome recipes in this book, we can’t begin to name them all.

Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna | Bob's Red Mill  @bobsredmill

We see a lot of cookbooks around here and what we like about this book is that it’s relatively small, so you’re not thumbing through 500 recipes, and it’s full of rather unique recipes. Plus, we know from personal experience that Erin’s recipes are reliable and delicious. We absolutely adore Erin’s writing style and her easy-to-follow recipes. Bonus: all of the recipes are vegan, making this ideal for anyone with both gluten and dairy restrictions.

Random House has generously offered us three copies of Bread & Butter to giveaway. We’ll pair each copy with a bag of our gluten free oat flour, cornmeal, potato starch and xanthan gum so you can get started baking right away. To enter, follow the prompts at the bottom of this post. We’ll select three winners at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 3/29/15. If you just can’t wait, look for this book at your favorite local bookseller.

Sweet Potato and Sage Pull Apart Rolls from Bread & Butter by Erin McKenna | Bob's Red Mill @bobsredmill |gluten free, vegan

Sweet Potato and Sage Pull-Apart Rolls

Makes 12 rolls

  • ¼ cup (33 g) cornmeal, for the baking
    sheet
  • 1½ cups (339 g) warm rice milk (about 100°F)
  • 3 tablespoons (66 g) agave nectar
  • 2½ teaspoons active dry yeast
  • ¹⁄³ cup (70 g) melted unscented coconut oil
  • ½ cup (165 g) canned sweet potato puree (at room temperature)
  • 3 cups (300 g) gluten-free oat flour
  • ½ cup (96 g) potato starch
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • 1½ teaspoons xanthan gum
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • ¹⁄³ cup (9 g) sage leaves, chopped

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, dust with cornmeal, and set aside.

In a small bowl, combine the warm rice milk, agave nectar, and yeast. Stir once and set aside to proof until it bubbles, about 10 minutes. Whisk in the oil and sweet potato.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the oat flour, potato starch, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum, and salt. Pour in the yeast mixture and, using a rubber spatula, stir until it is the consistency of a sticky dough. Fold in the sage.

Using a ½-cup measuring cup, scoop heaping portions of batter onto the prepared baking sheet and shape into squares. Leave no more than ½ inch between each roll on the pan. Cover the baking sheet with a dish towel and let the rolls rise for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 400°F.

Bake the rolls for 10 minutes, and then rotate the baking sheet 180 degrees. Bake until the crust is golden and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 6 minutes. Let the rolls cool on the pan for 10 minutes before serving.

Recipe from Bread & Butter (c) 2015 Erin McKenna

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Apple Spice Muffins | Bob's Red Mill

Apple Spice Muffins

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

It’s rare that we recommend a muffin as a nutritious snack, but these Apple Spice Muffins are one of those exceptions. Packed with whole grains and sweetened with date sugar, these muffins are a great way to get a serving of whole grains into your day while still being delicious. We don’t recommend sitting down to a whole batch of these muffins, but enjoying one after a workout or when you need a pick-me-up, is a fabulous way to refuel.

Date sugar is, quite simply, dried dates that have been ground into a powder. If you’re not able to find date sugar locally, you can snag a bag from our website or Amazon.com

Apple Spice Muffins | Bob's Red Mill

Apple Spice Muffins

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time:  25 – 30 minutes | Yield: 12 muffins

Topping

  • ½ cup Bob’s Red Mill Date Sugar
  • ½ tsp ground Allspice
  • ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground Black Pepper
  • ¼ tsp ground Clove
  • ¼ tsp ground Nutmeg

Muffins

  • 1-¾ cup Whole Wheat Pastry Flour
  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Date Sugar
  • 2-½ tsp Baking Powder
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • ½ tsp ground Cinnamon
  • ¼ tsp ground Allspice
  • ¼ tsp ground Nutmeg
  • 1-½ cups Applesauce
  • ½ cup melted Coconut Oil
  • 3 Eggs
  • 2 tsp Lemon Zest
  • 1 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1 cup diced Apple
  • ½ cup chopped Walnuts

Step 1

Preheat oven to 350°F.  Line a muffin tin with paper liners.

Step 2

In a small bowl, combine the topping ingredients and set aside.

Step 3

In a second small bowl, sift together the whole wheat pastry flour, Bob’s Red Mill Date Sugar, baking powder, salt and spices.

Step 4

In a large bowl, whisk together the applesauce, melted coconut oil, eggs, lemon zest and vanilla extract.

Step 5

And the dry mixture to the wet along with the diced apple and walnuts and fold gently until just incorporated.

Step 6

Scoop the batter into the prepared muffin tin.  Top each muffin with the topping mixture, dividing evenly between each, about 2 tsp per muffin.

Step 7

Bake muffins until the tops spring back when lightly touched and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, about 25 – 30 minutes.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Banana Barley Biscuits F

{Meatless Mondays} Banana Barley Biscuits

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

These are not your grandmother’s biscuits. Our banana barley biscuits balance delicately on the line between cookie and biscuit. Serve these biscuits at breakfast for a delicious whole grain addition to your plate, or turn them into a light dessert by topping with whipped cream. We tend to snack on them whenever we need a little pick-me-up, but we’ve also been known to turn them into ice cream sandwiches on a whim.

Adaptations: 

Make these biscuits fully whole grain by using our whole wheat pastry flour. If you can’t find rolled barley flakes locally, rolled oats will do in a pinch. Make these gluten free by using our gluten free rolled oats and our Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour

Banana Barley Biscuits | Bob's Red Mill
Banana Barley Biscuits

recipe by Sarah House for Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen

Prep Time: 20 minutes | Cook Time: 20-25 minutes | Yields 32 biscuits

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Combine sugar and cinnamon and set aside. Preheat oven to 400°F and grease two sheet pans or line them with parchment paper.
  2. Combine mashed bananas, milk and rolled barley flakes and let sit for about 5 minutes.
  3. Sift and combine flour, salt and baking powder. Cut in butter until the butter is about the size of peas.
  4. Add egg whites and vanilla to banana mixture then add flour mixture to banana mixture. Mix until just combined.
  5. Scoop 2 Tbsp of dough per biscuit onto prepared baking sheets. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.
  6. Bake at 400°F until golden brown, about 20 – 25 minutes. Serve hot. Serves 16 – 32 (1 to 2 biscuits per serving).
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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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Hot Cereal 2

Hot Cereal: Thinking Outside the Bowl

by Sarah House in Whole Grains 101

Hot cereal is a great way to start your day, especially with the variety of styles available:  flakes, farinas, grits and meals.  The possibilities of whole grain goodness are almost endless.  But, have you ever thought about making something other than your usual hot pot of breakfast cereal for you and the family?  If not, then you should.  Hot cereals are so much more than just for breakfast.

Hot Cereal F

Our flakes and rolled cereals (think oats, barley, rye, spelt, triticale and wheat) are perfect candidates for home-made granolas, crisps, and cookies.  Try swapping out the usual rolled oats in your favorite fruit crisp topping or oatmeal cookie with barley or wheat.  If you want to take it a step further, try incorporating rolled flake cereals into biscuits or breads.  Since the cooking time (think “how long it takes for the flakes to hydrate and soften”) is relatively short for rolled flake cereals, they are great candidates for additions to quick cooking items like biscuits and scones and they work great mixed-in and sprinkled-on yeasted breads and rolls.  The texture and décor they provide when incorporated into a loaf of bread or sprinkled on the top of rolls is an excellent way to personalize a recipe.  I like to add up to ½ cup rolled flakes into my single loaf bread recipes.  As a topping décor, anywhere from 2 Tbsp to ¼ cup usually gets the job done.

bread w oats

If you are aiming for a muffin or bar with a more delicate and chewy texture, farinas, grits, and meals are what you are looking for.  The amount of liquid necessary to fully hydrate the cereal will vary depending on the particular grain (wheat, corn, rice, millet, buckwheat, and many, many blends) so make sure to take note of the liquid amounts recommended in the basic preparation instructions before making a final choice.  Adjust the liquids in your recipe accordingly (or try soaking and then draining the cereal before using) otherwise, you may find some crunchy bits in your baked goods!

Finely ground cereals like farinas, grits, and meals release more starch than flakes or larger grind cereals.  This extra starch will contribute to softer textures and increased chew and also works well as a binder.  Try using a starchy cereal like Brown Rice Farina in place of a panade in your next meatloaf or to help hold together a batch of veggie burgers.

When incorporating farinas, grits, and meals into baked breads, their small grind and subsequent starchiness can cause a significant effect on the crumb similar to flours.  Using this style of cereal to replace some flours as opposed to “in addition to” will produce a better loaf.  For satisfying texture and flavor, replace up to 20% of a recipe’s flour with cereal; anymore and you’ll be looking at a shorter, heavier, and dense loaf (which isn’t always a bad thing).

Now, let’s say you cooked a big pot of porridge for breakfast and there is still a fair amount left over in the pot.  Did you know…you can bake that leftover hot breakfast cereal into your next loaf of bread?  As if you were adding nuts or seeds to your bread dough, try adding some cooked flakes or granular cereals.  Start small, about ¼ cup per loaf.  Once you know what the outcome is, adjust the amount and type of cereal to your liking.  I won’t go into specifics here and instead direct you to the master artisan bakers at Tartine in San Francisco, in particular their book Tartine Book No. 3.  If you are serious about bread baking, this book and all their other bread books are a goldmine of information and creative inspiration.

If you are feeling totally overwhelmed by the myriad possibilities of incorporating cereals into your recipe repertoire, just step back and take a breather.  Cook up a pot of good old-fashioned hot cereal and choose one of our unique topping combos for any easy and impressive spruce-up.

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Sarah House Google: Sarah House
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