Kasha Varnishkes- the traditional Ashkenazi Jewish dish made using buckwheat and farfalle pasta. Quick, easy and satisfyingly simple. // Bob's Red Mill

Kasha Varnishkes

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

The first time I had Kasha Varnishkes was at my grandmother’s house. I was skeptical, but willing to try this classic Jewish dish. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the mellow flavors of buckwheat, noodles and onions. My grandmother went all out (as she is wont to do) and served it alongside a full spread of traditional Eastern European foods. Personally, I like to pair a dish like this with something to balance it out, like roasted chicken and a fresh green salad or smoked salmon and roasted vegetables.

Kasha Varnishkes- the traditional Ashkenazi Jewish dish made using buckwheat and farfalle pasta. Quick, easy and satisfyingly simple. // Bob's Red Mill

No matter what you serve alongside it, this simple dish is a wonderful way to enjoy whole grain buckwheat. The earthy flavor of buckwheat stands out against bow-tie noodles and sauteed onions and creates a lovely medley of flavors. Kasha Varnishkes remind me a bit of buttered noodles from my knee-high days- it’s just one of those dishes that you could eat and eat and eat. L’Chayim

*If you need this dish to be gluten free, we recommend using your favorite gluten free pasta. If you can’t find farfalle, macaroni or rotini will work just fine. 

Kasha Varnishkes- the traditional Ashkenazi Jewish dish made using buckwheat and farfalle pasta. Quick, easy and satisfyingly simple. // Bob's Red Mill

Kasha Varnishkes

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Cook Time:  35 – 45 minutes | Yield: 4 – 8 servings

  • ¼ cup Oil or Schmaltz
  • 4 cups chopped onion (about 2 medium)
  • 1 cup toasted* Bob’s Red Mill Buckwheat Groats
  • 1 Egg
  • 2 Tbsp minced Garlic (about 4 cloves)
  • 3 cups Chicken Broth
  • 16 oz Farfalle pasta
  • Water as needed
  • ¼ cup chopped Parsley
  • 2 Tbsp Butter (optional)
  • ½ tsp Salt plus additional as needed

Step 1

Heat oil or schmaltz in a large, deep sauté pan over medium heat.  Add onions and cook until golden, about 15 – 20 minutes.  Remove onions with a slotted spoon and reserve.  While the onions are cooking, bring a large pot of salted water to a boil for the farfalle.

Step 2

Beat the egg in a small bowl then add toasted Bob’s Red Mill Buckwheat Groats and mix well to coat.

Step 3

Add egg/buckwheat mixture and garlic to the hot sauté pan, increase heat to high, and sauté until the individual buckwheat groats have separated and browned, about 2 – 4 minutes.

Step 4

Add the chicken stock and reserved onions to the pan and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to a simmer, cover tightly, and cook until the liquid has absorbed, about 10 – 15 minutes.

Step 5

While the buckwheat cooks, add the farfalle to the pot of boiling water and cook until soft.

Step 6

Remove the buckwheat from the heat.  Drain the pasta very well and toss with the buckwheat, parsley, butter and salt.

*To toast buckwheat, place in a clean sauté pan over medium-high heat.  Cook, stirring frequently, until the grains begin to pop and sizzle.   When the grains begin to pop, stir continuously until well toasted, about 10 minutes.  Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a cool bowl.


Kasha Varnishkes- the traditional Ashkenazi Jewish dish made using buckwheat and farfalle pasta. Quick, easy and satisfyingly simple. // Bob's Red Mill
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Beat the heat with the cooling flavors of Tabbouleh //whole grain, vegan // Bob's Red Mill

{Meatless Monday} Tabbouleh

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

When the words grain and salad are used together, tabbouleh is often one of the first things to come to mind. It’s one of the oldest grain salads around. Traditionally made from bulgur wheat, tomatoes, mint and parsley, our version of this Levantine dish is light and refreshing with the addition of cucumbers and lemon.

Beat the heat with the cooling flavors of Tabbouleh //whole grain, vegan // Bob's Red Mill

Tabbouleh comes together quickly and is incredibly versatile. Use it as a salad, side or include it in a full mezze spread. It makes a lovely sandwich filling and can be wrapped in pita bread or lettuce leaves for a wonderful lunch option.

Dishes like this redeem the dog days of summer, which we seem to be having more of around here than usual. Beyond the fact that you don’t even need to use the stove top for this recipe, the flavors of mint and cucumber are naturally cooling. Pair this with some hummus, warm pita bread and olives for a delightfully easy summer meal.

Need gluten free? Try quinoa in place of bulgur for a simple, easy swap. 

Beat the heat with the cooling flavors of Tabbouleh //whole grain, vegan // Bob's Red Mill

Tabbouleh

Prep Time: 10 minutes | Rest Time:  2 hours | Yield: 6 servings

  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Bulgur 
  • 1 cup boiling Water
  • 3 cups finely chopped Parsley
  • ¼ cup finely chopped Mint
  • ¼ cup finely minced Scallions
  • 2 medium Tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 1 medium Cucumber, seeded and diced
  • ½ tsp Sea Salt
  • ¼ tsp ground Cumin
  • ¼ tsp ground Black Pepper
  • 3 Tbsp fresh Lemon Juice
  • 3 Tbsp Olive Oil

Step 1

Combine Bob’s Red Mill Bulgur and boiling water and let soak for 1 hour.  Drain well and squeeze out any excess water.

Step 2

In a large bowl, combine drained bulgur, parsley, mint, scallions, tomatoes, cucumber, salt, cumin, black pepper and lemon juice.  Chill for 1 hour.

Step 3

Immediately before serving, add olive oil and toss well.

 

Beat the heat with the cooling flavors of Tabbouleh //whole grain, vegan // Bob's Red Mill
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Tarragon Tuna Salad- a zippy, whole grain salad perfect for hot summer nights. // Bob's Red Mill

Tarragon Tuna Salad

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

A few years ago, I’d never heard of or tasted tarragon. When I finally did try this crazy herb, I immediately adored its warm, sweet flavor and started using it whenever possible. I’ve since learned that it pairs beautifully with eggs, fish and chicken and have refined my willy-nilly tarragon use to a few special dishes where it can really shine and tarragon really shines in this recipe.

Tarragon Tuna Salad- a zippy, whole grain salad perfect for hot summer nights. // Bob's Red Mill

It took me approximately one bite to fall in love with this salad. Not only does it use tarragon appropriately, but it uses our Whole Grain Medley and French Green Lentils. The variety of grains in our blend offer flavors and textures that pair wonderfully with the earthiness of the lentils. Crisp apples offer a sweetness that aligns perfectly with the slight saltiness of the tuna. Throw in lemon, garlic and mustard and you have a salad that will make you sing.

This salad is a perfect dish for a hot summer night when the mere idea of turning on the oven makes you sweat. I make no promises that kids will love this one, but  adults will enjoy the toothsome grains and vivid dressing. Serve this alongside roasted veggies for a complete meal or fill pocket bread with this salad and some fresh lettuce for a classy lunch option.

If you can’t come by our Whole Grain Medley or need this to be gluten free, quinoa, sorghum or long grain brown rice will all work well in this recipe. 

Tarragon Tuna Salad- a zippy, whole grain salad perfect for hot summer nights. // Bob's Red Mill

Tarragon Tuna Salad

Prep Time: 15 minutes | Rest Time:  45 minutes | Cook Time:  60 – 90 minutes

Yield: 6 – 12 servings

  • 1 cup Bob’s Red Mill Whole Grain Medley
  • ½ cup Bob’s Red Mill Petite French Green Lentils
  • 4 cups Water, divided
  • 2 Tbsp Lemon Juice
  • 1 ½ tsp Honey
  • 1 tsp Lemon Zest
  • ½ tsp minced Garlic (about 1 small clove)
  • ¼ tsp prepared Mustard
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • ¾ cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 1 cup diced Apple (about 1 medium Fuji or Braeburn)
  • ½ cup diced Celery (about 2 stalks)
  • 8 oz canned Tuna
  • ¼ cup diced Sweet Onion
  • ¼ cup toasted Walnut pieces
  • ¼ cup torn Tarragon

Step 1

Combine 3 cups water and Bob’s Red Mill Grande Whole Grains in a medium pot.  Cover and bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until grains are soft, 60 – 90 minutes.  In a smaller pot, bring remaining 1 cup of water to a boil.  Add Bob’s Red Mill Petite French Green Lentils, reduce heat and simmer until soft, about 20 – 30 minutes.  Drain both grains and lentils very well and set aside to cool, about 45 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, in a food processor or blender, combine the lemon juice, honey, lemon zest, garlic, mustard and salt and process until smooth.  With the machine running, very slowly stream in the olive oil until a smooth emulsion forms, about 5 minutes.  Set aside.

Step 3

When the grains and lentils have thoroughly cooled, combine together with the apple, celery, tuna, onion, walnuts, tarragon and dressing.  Mix well.

 

Tarragon Tuna Salad- a zippy, whole grain salad perfect for hot summer nights. // Bob's Red Mill
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Simply Ancient Grains by Maria Speck

Burgundy Bulgur with Blueberries {Giveaway}

by Cassidy Stockton in Contests, Recipes, Whole Grains 101

Simply Ancient Grains, the newest book from renowned whole grain lover, Maria Speck is equally as beautiful as her last book- Ancient Grains for Modern Meals. As a fan of Ancient Grains for Modern Meals, I’m thrilled to say Simply Ancient Grains does not disappoint. Filled with stunning recipes like this burgundy bulgur, Maria explores the many different flavors of whole grains and provides inspiring ways to enjoy them without slaving away in the kitchen.

Simply Ancient Grains by Maria Speck

After a glossary of ancient grains and the many different ways to cook them, Simply Ancient Grains kicks off in a big way with a “Pick Your Grains” section. Here, you can pick a grain you know and love (or simply have on hand) and find the variety of recipes featuring that grain. The goal is to cook a big batch of the grain and use the recipes in the book to simplify your week. This is a woman who has heard “I don’t have time to cook whole grains” a few times in her career, I’ll bet. It becomes a very hard argument to put forth when the grains are already cooked. From breakfast fritatta muffins to a lovely grain salad for lunch and a beautiful entree for dinner, this book has a full day of ancient grains planned out to make your life a little easier. Of course, you don’t have to use the book that way, but we love the idea of it!

MariaSpeck w grain mill

Let me assure you, the recipes deliver. After looking at this book on my desk for a few weeks, I decided I absolutely had to make the cover dish for the Fourth of July holiday. Not only was it simple to make with easy-to-find ingredients, it was a huge hit with my guests. My husband even ate the leftovers without prodding. That, my friends, is a mark of success if ever I saw one.

Maria and the kind folks at Ten Speed have generously provided three copies of Simply Ancient Grains for us to giveaway. With each copy, we’ll provide some ancient grains—sorghum, farro, quinoa and millet—to get you started. To enter, simply follow the prompts below and we’ll select three winners at random from all who enter by 11:59 pm on 7/15/15. If you want to snag a copy of the book for yourself, you can grab one at any online book retailer or Amazon.com.

Burgundy Bulgur with Blueberries and Orange Blossom Water from Maria Speck's Simply Ancient Grains // Bob's Red Mill  // whole grain, simple, breakfast

Burgundy Bulgur with Blueberries and Orange Blossom Water

Serves 4

Of all of the grains in my pantry, intensely nutty bulgur is my go-to choice during the week. The fiber-rich grain is pleasing in a humble way yet speedy and unfussy. One morning, I tossed in all the color I could find in my kitchen to paint my bulgur a deep reddish-blue hue. This recipe gives you two splashy breakfast variations: Unsweetened cranberry juice creates an intense burst of tanginess and a stunning dark fuchsia in your bowl in which the blueberries stand out like jewels. Pomegranate juice lets you start your day on a naturally sweeter note, with a deep burgundy hue—one is as delightful as the other. As an added benefit, this breakfast is an antioxidant powerhouse. If you have orange blossom water in your cupboard, here its fleeting floral and bittersweet scent is a boon.  

BULGUR

  • 2 cups unsweetened pomegranate juice
  • 1 cup medium-coarse bulgur
  • 1⁄4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1⁄2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries (no need to defrost if using frozen)
  • 1 teaspoon honey, or more as needed
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated orange zest
  • 1⁄2 to 1 teaspoon orange blossom water, or more as needed (optional)

TO FINISH

  • 1 cup whole or low-fat Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon honey, or more as needed
  • 1⁄4 cup pomegranate seeds (from about 1⁄2 small fruit) or blueberries, for garnish

To make the bulgur, add the pomegranate juice, bulgur, cranberries, and vanilla to a heavy 3- or 4-quart saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring once or twice. Decrease the heat to maintain a simmer, cover, and cook for 10 minutes. Stir in the blueberries and honey and continue to simmer until the berries are warmed through, about 2 minutes. Gently stir in the zest and the orange blossom water. Taste and adjust with a bit more honey and orange blossom water if you like.

Meanwhile, add the Greek yogurt and the 1 tablespoon honey to a small bowl and beat until smooth.

To finish, divide the bulgur between four bowls. Top each with 1⁄4 cup of yogurt and garnish with pomegranate seeds. Drizzle with more honey if you like. Serve warm.

fine points

If you are new to orange blossom water, start with a little to acquaint yourself.

Leftovers reheat in the microwave—about 1 1⁄2 minutes on high per serving, stirring once in between.

GLUTEN-FREE Use quinoa, preferably red for a visual treat, instead of bulgur, and cook for 18 to 20 minutes.

VARIATION Use cranberry (instead of pomegranate) juice and 1 to 2 tablespoons honey (instead of 1 teaspoon) for the bulgur, and whole milk or part-skim ricotta (instead of Greek yogurt) to finish.

Reprinted with permission from Simply Ancient Grains by Maria Speck, copyright © 2015. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Random House LLC. Photography credit: Erin Kunkel © 2015

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Caprese Grain Salad made with whole grains perfect for Meatless Monday | Bob's Red Mill

{Meatless Monday} Caprese Grain Salad

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

The fresh flavors of basil and tomato shine brightly with our Whole Grain Medley in this Caprese Grain Salad. This blend combines our favorite whole grains—hard red wheat, brown rice, oats, rye, triticale, barley, kamut and buckwheat—for a wholesome, hearty base for salads, soups and sides. We love using our Whole Grain Medley for summer salads because the blend of grains offer a variety of textures and flavors you just can’t get from using a single grain. If you can’t find it locally, any one of the whole grains listed above can be used in this dish.

This salad can really be a stand-alone meal, but if you want to round it out, we like to serve this with a side of fresh fruit and crusty Italian bread.
Caprese Grain Salad made with whole grains perfect for Meatless Monday | Bob's Red Mill

Caprese Grain Salad

Prep Time: 10 minutes | Rest Time:  45 minutes | Cook Time:  60 – 90 minutes

Yield: 6 – 12 servings

  • 1 ½ cups Bob’s Red Mill Whole Grain Medley
  • 4 ½ cups Water
  • ½ cup Balsamic Vinegar
  • ¼ cup Honey
  • 2 cups chopped and seeded Tomatoes (about 3 – 4 large, 1 ¼ lbs.)
  • 8 oz Pearl Mozzarella, drained or Ciliegine Mozzarella, drained and halved
  • 1 cup torn Basil
  • Kosher Salt and ground Black Pepper, to taste

Step 1

Combine water and Bob’s Red Mill Whole Grain Medley in a medium pot.  Cover and bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until grains are soft, 60 – 90 minutes.  Drain grains very well and set aside to cool, about 45 minutes.

Step 2

Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine balsamic vinegar and honey.  Simmer over medium-low heat until reduced by ¼, about 10 minutes.  Set aside to cool.

Step 3

When the grains have thoroughly cooled, combine with the tomatoes, mozzarella, basil, balsamic mixture and salt and pepper to taste.  Mix well.

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50 States of Oatmeal : Bob's Red Mill

The United States of Oatmeal

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

Happy Independence Day! Tomorrow will be filled with barbecues, swimming excursions and fireworks in nearly every town across America. Instead of coming up with a patriotic cupcake or perfectly latticed apple pie, we wanted something a little more fun and creative to celebrate.

A few weeks ago, we asked our customers to share their state’s quintessential foods and did you ever deliver! From that list, Sarah from the Bob’s Red Mill Test Kitchen and I put together an oatmeal topping for each state using some of the most appealing foods from each state. There were some really fun foods suggested and we did our best to create combinations that would actually taste good. Think we didn’t represent your state well? Tell us in the comments what your topping combination would be. Enjoy!

50 States of Oatmeal: Michigan - Cherries, Walnuts, Mackinac Island Fudge // Bob's Red Mill

How to use this list: prepare your favorite bowl of oatmeal and use these toppings as a jumping off point. Add more (or less) of the suggested ingredient and celebrate your state Bob’s Red Mill style!

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | HawaiiIdaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | MarylandMassachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming | Washington DC

50 States of Oatmeal: Massachusetts - Fluffernutter Oatmeal // Bob's Red Mill

  • MichiganFresh tart cherries, chopped toasted walnuts, crumbled Mackinac Island Fudge (suggested by The Lemon Bowl)
  • Minnesota: Cooked wild rice and oats mixed with heavy cream + maple syrup + dried blueberries/cranberries/raisins + toasted chopped hazelnuts, all on top of oatmeal (with extra drizzles of heavy cream and maple syrup!) (Suggested by Girl Versus Dough)
  • MississippiOats topped with graham cracker chunks, drizzled with chocolate fudge sauce and topped with a dollop of whipped cream
  • Missouri: Pan-fried oatmeal topped with Parmesan cheese and marinara
  • Montana: Huckleberry S’mores: huckleberry jam, graham cracker crumbles and bruleed marshmallow cream.

50 States of Oatmeal: Montana: Huckleberry compote, graham cracker chunks and topped with marshmallow cream (chocolate is optional) // Bob's Red Mill

    • Nebraska: Browned Butter Oatmeal topped with miniature popcorn balls
    • Nevada: Dessert buffet! Brownies, ice cream, cookie dough, whipped cream, sprinkles, cherries, you name it- throw it all on there, you may even want to double-down on this one! Go big or go home! (Suggested by The Roasted Root)
    • New HampshireOats mixed with pumpkin pie filling, topped with maple sugar and placed under the broiler for a brulee topping
    • New Jersey: Combine cheddar cheese with hot oatmeal, top with chunks of fried pork roll and a fried egg
    • New Mexico: Hatch chiles with green sauce, topped with warm pinto beans, and queso crumbles
    • New York: Plain oats combined with salty blue cheese, chunks of celery and drizzled with Frank’s Red Hot (shredded chicken optional)
    • North CarolinaSweet potato puree mixed with oats and brown sugar, topped with candied pecans
    • North Dakota: Potato lefse roll-ups filled with oats that have been flavored with butter and sugar
    • Ohio: Peanut butter oatmeal drizzled with chocolate fudge sauce (roasted salted peanuts optional) aka Buckeyes
    • Oklahoma: Oats topped with cornmeal fried okra, sprinkled with toasted salted pecans
    • Oregon: Marionberry compote with hazelnut crumble

50 States of Oatmeal: Oregon- Marionberry compote with hazelnut crumble // Bob's Red Mill

  • Pennsylvania: Oats and cheddar (or cheese whiz) topped with thinly sliced steak
  • Rhode IslandOatmeal topped with lemon sorbet, whipped cream and candied lemon zest
  • South Carolina: Oatmeal mixed with coconut cream, topped with toasted coconut and toasted benne seeds (sesame seeds)
  • South Dakota: Oatmeal topped with coffee cake crumbles, custard and sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar
  • Tennessee: Oatmeal mixed with banana pudding and topped with crumbled vanilla wafers and fresh banana slices
  • Texas: Oatmeal topped with a heavy dollop of salted pecan pie filling, topped with whipped cream
  • Utah: Add oatmeal to a traditional funeral potato recipe, such as this one, or, combine oatmeal with sauteed onions and garlic, with cheese and topped with cornflakes
  • Vermont: Oatmeal mixed with Vermont cheddar, topped with spice apple compote
  • Virginia: Oatmeal topped with chunks of Virginia Ham, drizzled with honey mustard and sprinkled with chives
  • Washington: Nanaimo bars crust crumbles and nanaimo bar filling drizzle
  • West Virginia: Molasses fudge cream drizzle with sweet crumble topping
  • Wisconsin: Oats flavored with maple syrup and topped with dried cranberries and a scoop of frozen custard (Suggested by Well Plated)
  • Wyoming: Oats topped with toasted coconut, toasted pecans and miniature chocolate chips
  • Washington DC: Spicy beef/pork sausage cubes (aka half-smokes) topped with chili and diced onion
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Lemon Mint Freekeh Salad // This bright and herbal salad is an interesting twist on traditional tabbouleh. // Bob's Red Mill // vegan

{Meatless Monday} Lemon Mint Freekeh Salad

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Cracked Freekeh might just be our new favorite whole grain. It cooks so quickly and has such a nice flavor, it’s hard for us to find any reason not to use it. Sure, quinoa cooks up quickly and has a lovely flavor as well, but it’s fun to use something new (even if it’s very, very old). This recipe is a play on tabbouleh that’s fresh and light- perfect for a warm summer evening (which we’ve had plenty of recently).

If you can’t find freekeh, bulgur will work in a pinch, as will quinoa if you need this recipe to be gluten free. 

Lemon Mint Freekeh Salad // This bright and herbal salad is an interesting twist on traditional tabbouleh. // Bob's Red Mill // vegan

Lemon Mint Freekeh Salad

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Water
  • 1 cup Organic Cracked Freekeh
  • 2 cups fresh Parsley (50g)
  • 1 cup fresh Mint (25g)
  • 2 tsp Lemon Zest (from 1 lemon)
  • 1/2 cup Lemon Juice (from 2 lemons)
  • 1/2 cup Pine Nuts toasted
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1/2 tsp Ground Black Pepper
  • 1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • 15 oz Garbanzo Beans cooked
  • 2 each medium Red Bell Peppers diced
  • 2 each large Tomatoes diced

Instructions
Bring water to a boil in a small saucepan. Add Bob’s Red Mill Organic Cracked Freekeh, reduce heat, partially cover and let simmer until liquid has absorbed, about 10 – 15 minutes. Drain thoroughly and let cool for 30 minutes.

In a food processor or blender, puree parsley, mint, lemon zest and juice for about 15 seconds. Add the toasted pine nuts, salt and pepper and puree until smooth, another 15 seconds. With the machine running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil. Continue to process until smooth.

In a large bowl, toss the herb pesto with the cooled Bob’s Red Mill Cracked Freekeh, chickpeas, red bell peppers and tomatoes. Serve immediately or chilled.

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With shredded carrots, coconut, and pineapple, these Morning Glory Muffins are healthy without being bland and boring. They make a great breakfast option or on-the-go snack. // Bob's Red Mill

Whole Wheat Morning Glory Muffins

by Cassidy Stockton in Recipes

It’s no secret that we love a good whole grain muffin around here and these Morning Glory Muffins fit the bill perfectly. As Bob likes to say, “You just can’t go wrong with a whole grain muffin.” Made with whole wheat flour and shredded carrots, coconut, and pineapple, these muffins are healthy without being bland and boring. They make a great breakfast option or on-the-go snack. These hold up really well and are a perfect addition to your travel bag for long days in the airport or on the road.

With shredded carrots, coconut, and pineapple, these Morning Glory Muffins are healthy without being bland and boring. They make a great breakfast option or on-the-go snack. // Bob's Red Mill

Morning Glory Muffins

  • 2 cups Bob’s Red Mill Whole Wheat Flour
  • 1 cup Sugar
  • 2 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 Tbsp ground Cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp Salt
  • 3/4 cup unsweetened shredded Coconut
  • 3 large Eggs
  • 1/2 cup Vegetable Oil
  • 1/2 cup Applesauce
  • 2 tsp Vanilla Extract
  • 1 large Apple, peeled and grated
  • 2 cups grated Carrot
  • 1 cup crushed Pineapple, drained
  • 1 cup chopped Walnuts

STEP 1 Preheat oven to 350ºF. Line muffin tin with paper baking cups.

STEP 2 In a bowl, whisk together flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Add the coconut and stir to combine.

STEP 3 In a separate bowl, whisk together eggs, oil, applesauce and vanilla. Add apple, carrot and pineapple and stir to combine. Add in flour mixture and stir until just combined. Gently mix in walnuts.

STEP 4 Spoon batter into baking cups, filling each completely. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean. Cool muffins in the pan for 10 minutes. Move to wire rack to cool completely. Makes 12 muffins.

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Oregon Blackberry Pie : For this blackberry pie, we've chosen to use our Whole Wheat Pastry Flour to make the crust. The whole grain flour brings a nuttiness to the pie that pairs wonderfully with the sweet filling. Sure, it makes it a wee bit healthier too, but who is eating pie because it's healthy? (Not us!)  | Bob's Red Mill

Oregon Blackberry Pie

by Cassidy Stockton in Meatless Mondays, Recipes

Blackberries are abundant in Oregon. Frankly, they’re abundant anywhere they grow, as is the nature of the blackberry bush, but we like to think Oregon blackberries are something special. It’s a bit early in the year to find them growing wild, but come August there will be no end of blackberry pies, milkshakes, ice cream, crisps, crumbles… you name it! Blackberries have always been one of my favorite berries, even if they have bigger seeds than raspberries and the core of the berry typically stays with the fruit (where a raspberry is hollow on the inside). This just makes them a little more work for some recipes, but if you get good blackberries, they’re incredibly sweet and worth any effort put forth.

For this blackberry pie, we’ve chosen to use our Whole Wheat Pastry Flour to make the crust. The whole grain flour brings a nuttiness to the pie that pairs wonderfully with the sweet filling. Sure, it makes it a wee bit healthier too, but who is eating pie because it’s healthy? (Not us!) If you need a gluten free version, try this Honey Blackberry Pie or simply use our Gluten Free Pie Crust Mix.

Oregon Blackberry Pie : For this blackberry pie, we've chosen to use our Whole Wheat Pastry Flour to make the crust. The whole grain flour brings a nuttiness to the pie that pairs wonderfully with the sweet filling. Sure, it makes it a wee bit healthier too, but who is eating pie because it's healthy? (Not us!)  | Bob's Red Mill

Oregon Blackberry Pie

For Crust:

For filling:

STEP 1 In a large bowl, combine flour and salt. Using a pastry blender, cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Mix in water, one tablespoon at a time, until dough begins to form. Divide dough and form each piece into a disk. Wrap each piece in plastic and refrigerate for 1 hour.

STEP 2 In a large bowl, combine berries, sugar, flour, lemon zest and juice.

STEP 3 Preheat oven to 425ºF. On a floured surface, roll first disk into a 12-inch circle. Place crust in pie plate. Press the dough into pie plate. Pour berry mixture into pie shell.

STEP 4 Roll out second disk into a 12-inch circle and careful lift and place over filling. Trim dough edges, leaving 1/2-inch overhang. Fold under overhanging dough and crimp edges to seal. Cut four slits in top crust.

STEP 5 Brush top crust with milk and sprinkle with remaining sugar. Place a baking pan on lower rack. Bake on middle rack for 25 minutes. Reduce temperature to 375ºF and bake for 30 minutes or until crust is golden brown and juices are bubbling. Remove from oven and cool on wire rack at least 1 hour.

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If you're going to take the time to cook beans and whole grains from scratch, making a big batch and freezing the leftovers will save you time in the long run. Learn how to best store these ingredients. | Bob's Red Mill

Storing Cooked Grains and Beans

by Cassidy Stockton in Whole Grains 101

Last year I wrote a post about the best way to store uncooked whole grains, today, I’m sharing how to best store cooked grains and beans. This topic comes up a lot around here because whole grains and dried beans are time consuming to cook and lack of time is one of the most common reasons people cite for not cooking with whole grains or making dried beans.

If you're going to take the time to cook beans and whole grains from scratch, making a big batch and freezing the leftovers will save you time in the long run. Learn how to best store these ingredients. | Bob's Red Mill

Yes, cooking beans and grains is time consuming. That’s why you need to make it worth your effort. Most people who use whole grains often will tell you to make a large batch and store the rest for use throughout the week. But how do you do that? What is the best method for storing cooked grains? My conundrum has always been that I will make a big batch, but I get worried about how long they last in the fridge (what day did I make those again?) or I forget to use them and they go to waste. Then, I discovered that most grains and beans can be frozen with no ill effects.

I freeze my grains in resealable plastic bags in 2 cup portions, small usable amounts that work well for a meal on the fly. They take very little time to defrost (simply plop that sealed plastic bag into a bowl of hot water for 15 minutes and you’re good to go) and take about 40 minutes off your cook time. They taste just as good as freshly cooked grains. Same thing goes for beans. They take a bit longer to defrost, but far less time than cooking from scratch. You can easily use any form of airtight container- plastic, glass, whatever. I like the bags because they take up less room in my freezer, can be easily labeled and can be set in water to defrost quickly.

Grains that work well with the freezer method:

Grains that don’t work very well, are those that tend to be softer when cooked, such as Millet, Amaranth and Teff. They’ll freeze just fine, they just won’t have the same properties as they did before they were frozen. All beans will work well when frozen, though lentils and softer beans may be a bit mushy upon defrosting.

That’s the freezer method. If you are good about using your grains and beans throughout the week- airtight containers in the fridge work fine. Cooked grains and beans will last approximately 3-4 days in the fridge. They’ll last about 2 months in the freezer.

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Cassidy Stockton Google: Cassidy Stockton
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